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Dr K K Aggarwal

A symposium on Diet, Health & Religion, second in a series was held at Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan on 5th September, 2012. The Chief Guest was Shri J Veeraraghavan, Chairman, Bhavan’s KM Munshi Institute of Educational Leadership and Management.

Welcoming the gathering, Shri Ashok Pradhan, Director, BVB said that the purpose of this symposium was to examine the relation between what we eat, how it affects our health and how all religions look at this aspect. Nature is also related to our health. Nature tells us what to eat. For example, summer vegetables have a high content of water. Speaking on fasting, he observed that not eating on certain days cleanses our body.

Dr KK Aggarwal

As medical fraternity, we must know what dietary religious practices are.

Most religions agree that fasting is good for health. Pot belly obesity, diabetes, hypertension and paralysis are all linked to metabolic syndrome which is characterized by insulin resistance which can be traced to refined carbohydrates, which are white sugar and refined flour. Any food, which is refined, is bad for health.

The body has a circadian rhythm. The digestive fire is weakest between 6 and 10 pm, i.e. enzymes for digestion are at lowest levels. Foods that are mismatched should not be combined together. A predigested food such as curd should not be mixed with an undigested food, it will lead to indigestion. Ayurveda recommends against eating fermented food at night. Alcohol is also fermented and so should not be taken after sunset. Alcohol is an evening drink (evening is the period before sunset and  with sunset the night starts. Alcohol is beneficial to the body if it is taken before sunset. About 80% of Indians may have vitamin D deficiency. So, 60000 units of vitamin D should be taken with milk once a month.

 Consensus

  • Eat less or in moderation.
  • Eat seasonal and locally grown vegetables.
  • Eat variety and color.
  • Any food that is prohibited by doctors is injuries to health and should not be taken.
  • Food is a gift from God.
  • Eat only when hungry.
  • Most religions have some restriction on combination of food.
  • Avoid alcohol, as per the regulations of your religion.

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If you have suffered from dengue last year, you need to be more careful as the second attack of dengue may be more dangerous than the first attack.

There are four different types of dengue and one can, therefore, suffer with dengue four times in his or her lifetime. The second or subsequent dengue infections tend to be more serious.

A person with dengue can also simultaneously suffer from malaria. Malaria and dengue together can lower platelet counts to a dangerous level leading to complications.

In a dengue season, nobody should take aspirin for fever as it can precipitate bleeding, he added.

In dengue most complications occur within two days of the fever subsiding and most people are casual during this period. Any type of abdominal pain, giddiness or weakness after the fever has subsided should be attended to, by a doctor. Dengue complications during this period are due to shift of blood volume and patient requires rapid infusion of oral or intravenous fluids in large quantity.

Platelet transfusion is not required even if the count is as low as 10000 unless there is an associated bleeding.

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A symposium on Diet, Health & Religion, second in a series was held at Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan on 5th September, 2012. The Chief Guest was Shri J Veeraraghavan, Chairman, Bhavan’s KM Munshi Institute of Educational Leadership and Management.

Welcoming the gathering, Shri Ashok Pradhan, Director, BVB said that the purpose of this symposium was to examine the relation between what we eat, how it affects our health and how all religions look at this aspect. Nature is also related to our health. Nature tells us what to eat. For example, summer vegetables have a high content of water. Speaking on fasting, he observed that not eating on certain days cleanses our body.

Dr Shikha Sharma

Eating a balanced diet is important. There is a lot of diversity that we can bring in our food.

  • All vegetables and fruits are a treasure of vitamins and minerals.
  • So if we start eating only one kind of food, these vitamins and mineral are lost leading to deficiencies.
  • A balanced diet is thus not in terms of carbohydrates, but one which has 7 colors and 6 tastes.
  • Fasting acts like a brake on unlimited eating and helps us to come back to our natural rhythm.
  • Our diets may also differ according to blood groups. Each blood group represents a specific genetic profile.

o   Blood group B – should not eat sugary foods as they are very sensitive to high sugars. They should avoid refined flour, white sugar, white rice and breads. Eat more of chana, kala chana and moong dal.

o   Blood group A – should avoid heavy meals. They are low in acid levels and are prone to indigestion. They should eat lean fish, soya, wheat and green vegetables.

o   Blood group AB – There are no restrictions for this blood group. They can have a mixed diet.

o   Blood group O – people with blood group O should not eat too much of acidic food as their body is very acidic. They should avoid tea, coffee, fried food and sour foods.

  • It is important to understand our body and eat food which is in accordance to our body.
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1. Look for coexisting medical condition, psychiatric disorder, neurologic disease, sleep disorder or drug associated with insomnia.

2. Insomnia that last less than three months: acute insomnia, circadian rhythm sleep disorders (jet lag, shift work), and high altitude insomnia.

  1. Insomnia that last longer than one month: include inadequate sleep hygiene, psycho-physiological insomnia, idiopathic insomnia, behavioral insomnia of childhood, paradoxical insomnia, and insomnia associated with a variety of medical conditions, psychiatric disorders, neurologic diseases, sleep disorders, medications, or drugs.

Acute insomnia

a.     Acute insomnia lasts for less than three months

b.    Is temporally related to an identifiable stressor

c.     Synonyms for acute insomnia include adjustment insomnia, short-term insomnia, stress-related insomnia, and transient insomnia.

d.    Resolve when the stressor resolves or when the individual adapts to it.

e.     Stressors can be physical, psychological, psychosocial, interpersonal, or environmental:

f.     Stressor as mentioned in Vidur Niti: A thief, A lustful person, A person who has lost all his wealth, A person who has failed to achieve success, A person who is weak and has been attacked by a strong person.

g.    Ayurveda describes sleep as an aggravation of Vata. The causes are mental tension; suppressed feelings & acute bitterness.

h.     Other stressors :  Changes in the type or level of background noise; changes in the bedroom, such as a different bed or different furnishings, lighting, temperature, or occupants; consumption of or withdrawal from caffeine, nicotine, alcohol, or foods or beverages that contain these substances; stressful life events, such as loss of a loved one, divorce, loss of employment, arguments, particularly happy or sad events, work demands, or school demands; acute or chronic injuries or illnesses, particularly those causing pain or discomfort; medications or illicit drugs that have stimulant properties such as  theophylline, beta blockers, steroids, thyroxine, bronchodilators, or amphetamines, withdrawal from central nervous system depressant drugs and nursing home or hospital admission.

i.       Stress-induced insomnia is related to increased activation of arousal systems rather than decreased drive for sleep.

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A symposium on Diet, Health & Religion, second in a series was held at Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan on 5th September, 2012. The Chief Guest was Shri J Veeraraghavan, Chairman, Bhavan’s KM Munshi Institute of Educational Leadership and Management.

Welcoming the gathering, Shri Ashok Pradhan, Director, BVB said that the purpose of this symposium was to examine the relation between what we eat, how it affects our health and how all religions look at this aspect. Nature is also related to our health. Nature tells us what to eat. For example, summer vegetables have a high content of water. Speaking on fasting, he observed that not eating on certain days cleanses our body.

Samani Charitra Prajna said that the core principle of Jainism is Nonviolence. Food is the main source of energy to survive.

  • Bhagwan Mahavir talked about two types of diet – Hitkari (Beneficial) and Mitkari (Moderate).
  • Jains are vegetarins, lactovegetarian. Many Jains are now vegans. Many avoid root vegetables in their diet.
  • Among the seven prohibited addictions, alcohol is one.
  • Also, beverages and drugs that contaminate our mind are prohibited. Anything which distorts the mind, which produces negative emotions are prohibited by the Jain religion.
  • Jainism believes in fasting as a means to purify the mind and body.
  • Jains observe several days of fasting, where they abstain from food, only water can be taken but not after sunset.
  • There are many ways of fasting like abandon of all kinds of food for a day or more, unodari – that means eat less than hunger, ras parityag – give up food like butter, milk, oil for few days etc.
  • No meals should be taken after sunset. If stomach is heavy at the time of sleep, one cannot sleep soundly.
  • In Jainism, there is a mention of abstinence from night eating. Acharya Hemchandra, in Yoga Shastra, says that the digestive system becomes inactive after sunset.
  • So this time is not suitable to eat.
  • Any food which supports spirituality is recommended.
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Tips For Boosting Memory

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Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: | | Comments Off

Follow routines, such as leaving your car keys, glasses, and cell phone in the same place every day so that finding them becomes a “no brainer.”

Slow down and pay attention to what you are doing to give your brain’s memory systems enough time to create an enduring memory.

Avoid distracting or noisy environments and multitasking — the major memory busters in today’s fast-paced society.

Get enough sleep, reduce stress, and check with your doctor to see if any of your medications affect memory — all potential memory spoilers.

[Harvard Medical School]

 

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Dr Ashok Walia
, Minister of Health Government of Delhi, in his message to the 4th Dil ka Darbar said that telecardiology should now become a part of the facilities in every hospital.

The Darbar was organized by Heart Care Foundation of India in association with Department of AYUSH and various Departments under Health Ministry, Government of Delhi on Sunday at Talkatora Stadium, New Delhi.

 Messages were also received from many dignitaries.

 Shri M. Veerapa Moily, Union Minister of Law said that non-governmental organizations should play an important role in healthcare of poor patients who are unable to meet hospital bills and consultation fees.

 Shri Beni Prasad Verma, Union Minister of Steel, expressed confidence that this endeavor of the Foundation would provide a platform to thousand of heart patients to avail facilities like free checkups, etc.

 Shri Bhoopinder Singh Hooda, Chief Minister of Haryana, said that priority of the government should be to provide free medicines to those people who cannot afford them. Shri Narendra Modi, Chief Minister, Gujarat said that changing lifestyle, stressful event and competitive environment are responsible for most heart diseases. Shri Lal Thanhawla, Chief Minister of Mizoram said that the time has come for the medical fraternity to educate general masses about healthy living.

 Shri Akhilesh Yadav, Chief Minister Uttar Pradesh, said that the efforts of the Foundation to provide facilities of free check-ups to the heart patients and interaction with top cardiologists during the programme are highly commendable.

 The Chief Minister of Kerala, Mr. Oommen Chandy said that in our country where cases of heart ailments are on the rise, the activities of Heart Care Foundation of India are truly inspiring.

 Shri Raj Kumar Chauhan, Minister of PWD, said that NGOs should come forward to organize free health checkup camps for the public. Prof. Kiran Walia, Minister of Social Welfare, Government of Delhi said that telecardiology consultations should also be used for free health checkup camps.   Shri Arvinder Singh Lovely, Minister of Education, Government of Delhi, said that heart awareness should be the priority of every individual.

Inaugurating the Darbar, Shri B Mandal, General Manager, Central Bank of India said that one should follow the laws of nature to prevent cardiac diseases. He said that wild animals do not get heart attack.

Presiding over the function, Shri AK Ganeriwala, IAS, Joint Secretary, AYUSH, said that the death prevention heart care is when you combine allopathy with other systems of medicines.

Padma Shri & Dr. B.C. Roy National Awardee, Dr. KK Aggarwal, President, Heart Care Foundation of India, who is also the Vice President-Elect of National Indian Medical Association, said that everyone after the age of 30 should get their risk of getting heart attack in the next 10 years evaluated and take precautions if the risk is more than 10%. He also demonstrated and conducted a workshop on “How to revive a dead patient.” He said that within 10 minutes of death, it is possible to revive a dead person’s heart by following the formula of 10 i.e. within 10 minutes of death, for the next 10 minutes, one should compress the chest of the deceased person 100 times (10 x 10).

 Guest of Honour, noted singer and composer Ms Shibani Kashyap, said that music is good for recovery of the heart patients. Chanting various sounds is similar to doing meditation.

Dr Ishwar VB Reddy, Director, Morarji Desai National Institute of Yoga, Dr Ramesh Babu Devalla, DG CHRS, Dr Surender Verma, DG, Dept. of Homeopathy in a joint statement said that blockages in the heart is lifestyle disorder and can be prevented utilizing all systems of medicines.

Dr PK Sharma, MOH NDMC and Dr NK Yadav, Director Health MCD South in a joint statement said that one should not consume trans fats in diet and reduce amount of salt intake to prevent future heart diseases.

 Shri Satish Upadhyay, Chairman, Standing Committee on Education, MCD South said that prevention of heart diseases should start right in school age.

Dr NV Kamath, DHS, Shri PK Jaggi, Head of Office Drug Controller Department of Government of Delhi said that one should believe in natural pharmacy and take medicines only when they are required. Others who were present were Hakim Javed-ul-Haq Director General Central Council for Research in Unani Medicine (CCRUM), Dr RK Manchanda, Director General, CCRH, Dr Surender Verma Dy. Director Dept.of ISM & Homeopathy, Dr PK Sharma Medical Officer Health NDMC, Dr NK Yadav Director (Health) MCD South, Director ISM & H, Govt. of NCT of Delhi and Dr NV Kamat Director Health Services.

Eminent faculty on the dais included : Dr RK Manchanda, Dr PK Sharma, Dr Rajesh Malhotra, Dr NK Bhatia, Dr. SV Tripathi, Dr HK Chopra, Dr Manju Gupta, Dr Anupam, Dr Praveen Chandra, Dr Subhash Manchanda, Dr Sameer Srivastava, Dr Yugal Mishra, Dr Praveen Bhatia, Dr Sujay Shad, Dr Neelam Mohan, Dr Ajit Saxena, Dr Saurabh Juneja, Dr BN Sinha, Dr RK Tuli, Dr ZS Mehrwal, Dr JC Katoch, Dr Ishwar V Basava Reddy and  Dr Ramesh Babu Devalla.

Over 2000 heart patients were given consultations and checkups.

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A symposium on Diet, Health & Religion, second in a series was held at Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan on 5th September, 2012. The Chief Guest was Shri J Veeraraghavan, Chairman, Bhavan’s KM Munshi Institute of Educational Leadership and Management.

Shri J Jolly spoke on the injunctions in Sikh scriptures, which speak about spiritual evolution of soul and earning livelihood with honesty and hard work.  Fundamentally, human is composed of body, mind and soul. A healthy body is dependent on the subtle mind, which in turn is dependent on the soul.

  • We must take good care of the body as it is the temple of God – nurture it well. One should not overeat or oversleep.
  • If we are inclined to sensual gratification, our life is cursed.
  • Gurbani does not believe in fasting or observing rituals or religious baths. What is essential is keeping the mind clean, by continuously remembering God.
  • Sweets should not be eaten in excess, the lesser we eat, more better it is for us as it reduces disease.
  • Gurbani says that we should not fight over whether we should eat or not eat meat. A person becomes vegetarian as he evolves spiritually.
  • We should not read religious scriptures and at the same time be involved in hurting others.
  • We should avoid foods that bring suffering to a body and which creates evil currents in the mind.
  • Sikhism does not restrict one to be a vegetarian but with spiritual advancements one automatically shifts towards vegetarianism.
  • Sikhism says big NO to alcohol.
  • Smoking is considered as a cardinal sin.
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