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Dr K K Aggarwal

Reduce weight first if facing infertility problem

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off

Both obese men and women can face fertility problems unless they reduce their weight. Reducing weight as the first step can bring back their fertility.

• Obese men are more than three times as likely to have low sperm counts compared with their normal-weight peers. A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility showed that the heaviest men were at triple the risk of having a low count of progressively motile sperms, those that swim forward in a straight line.

• Increased body fat can also contribute to lower testosterone levels and higher estrogen levels.

• Obese men were also 1.6 times more likely than overweight or normal-weight men to have a high percentage of abnormally shaped sperm.

• There is a trend toward increasing likelihood of erectile dysfunction with increasing BMI.

• Obesity is associated with a greater risk of impotence.

• Obesity is also associated with metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) in women and associated infertility.

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How long can one fast?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off

As per Allopathy, one cannot live without air or oxygen for more than 3 minutes, without water for more than three days and without food for more than 3 weeks. As per Chandogya Upanishad, food is responsible for the making of motor organs (Karmendriyas), sensory organs, manas (mind, intellect, memory and ego) and prana. The fiery foods are responsible for making the motor indriyas, earthy foods the sensory indriyas and manas and water for making Prana Vayu. Therefore, it is possible for a person to live on water for up to few weeks because he will keep making Prana and keep breathing but absence of food on 14th day onwards will start affecting his Gnanaindriyas and Manas. The person will start losing power of hearing, touching and sensing and will start showing impairment in mental status, memory, intellect functions and egoistic behavior

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The Seven Dhatus in Ayurveda

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off

As per Ayurveda physiology, food is Brahman and contains the same consciousness as in us and this consciousness is the essence of any food. Any food digested is converted into three portions, the gross undigested food is converted into waste (feces); the middle one is converted in one of the Dhatus and the subtlest form gets converted into ojas or the immunity. As per standard Ayurveda, food once eaten is converted into the first Dhatu i.e. Rasa. Once the formation of Rasa is complete, the remaining is converted into Rakta (blood).The left over essence of food makes Mamsa (muscles), the leftover of which makes (Medha (adipose tissue) and so on to form Asthi (Bone), Majja (bone marrow) and Shukra (sperm/ova). As per this physiology, the second Dhatu will only form once the first Dhatu is of good quality and so on and at any step if the Dhatu is not formed properly, the subsequent Dhatu will also be defectively formed. For example, defective Dhatu at the stage of Asthi (bone) will have normal plasma (blood), muscle and adipose tissue but may have an impaired immunity/sperm/bone marrow. Similarly, defective Dhatu at the level of bone marrow may have only impaired immunity with no impairment of other Dhatus. On the other hand, impairment of Dhatus at the level of plasma or blood will involve all other Dhatus in sickness. Isolated disorders of Shukra may have no involvement of other Dhatus at all. This Ayurveda principle can help us to answer many yet unanswered questions in modern allopathy. Like – why in typhoid fever all the organs are involved and why in azoospermia no other organ is involved. The Upanishads talk about formation of Dhatus in much more detail. According to them, different types of foods make different types of Dhatus. Fiery foods like oil and ghee are responsible for formation of Karmendriyan (part of shukra), bone and bone marrow (Dhatu). The earthy foods are responsible for formation of Gnanandriyan and Manas (shukra) and muscle (flesh) and water in food is responsible for formation of Rasa and Rakta (plasma and blood) and Pran (Shukra). This means that every different type of food would make different types of Dhatus and a balanced food with a combination of fire, water and earth will only be responsible for formation of shukra, immunity or the essence.

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Water Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under eMedinewS | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off

Safe water is an essential commodity for prevention of most water and food-borne diseases like diarrhea, typhoid and jaundice. These diseases are 100% preventable. All of them can be lethal if not prevented, diagnosed or treated in time. Transmission of parasitic infections can also occur with contaminated water. Here are a few tips:

• Travelers should avoid consuming tap water.

• Avoid ice made from tap water.

• Avoid any food rinsed in tap water.

• Chlorination kills most bacterial and viral pathogens.

• Chlorination does not kill giardia or amoeba cysts.

• Chlorination does not kill Cryptosporidium.

• Boiled/Treated/Bottled water is safe.

• Carbonated drinks, wine and drinks made with boiled water are safe.

• Freezing does not kill organisms that cause diarrhea. Ice in drinks is not safe unless it has been made from adequately boiled or filtered water.

• Alcohol does not sterilize water or the ice. Mixed drinks may still be contaminated.

• Hot tea and coffee are the best alternates to boiled water.

• Bottled drinks should be requested without ice and should be drunk from the bottle with a straw rather than with a glass.

• Boiling water for 3 minutes followed by cooling to room temperature will kill bacterial parasites.

• Adding two drops of 5% sodium hydrochloride (bleach) to quarter of water (1 liter) will kill most bacteria in 30 minutes.

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The Seven Dhatus in Ayurveda

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off

As per Ayurveda physiology, food is Brahman and contains the same consciousness as in us and this consciousness is the essence of any food. Any food digested is converted into three portions, the gross undigested food is converted into waste (feces); the middle one is converted in one of the Dhatus and the subtlest form gets converted into ojas or the immunity. As per standard Ayurveda, food once eaten is converted into the first Dhatu i.e. Rasa. Once the formation of Rasa is complete, the remaining is converted into Rakta (blood).The left over essence of food makes Mamsa (muscles), the leftover of which makes (Medha (adipose tissue) and so on to form Asthi (Bone), Majja (bone marrow) and Shukra (sperm/ova). As per this physiology, the second Dhatu will only form once the first Dhatu is of good quality and so on and at any step if the Dhatu is not formed properly, the subsequent Dhatu will also be defectively formed. For example, defective Dhatu at the stage of Asthi (bone) will have normal plasma (blood), muscle and adipose tissue but may have an impaired immunity/sperm/bone marrow. Similarly, defective Dhatu at the level of bone marrow may have only impaired immunity with no impairment of other Dhatus. On the other hand, impairment of Dhatus at the level of plasma or blood will involve all other Dhatus in sickness. Isolated disorders of Shukra may have no involvement of other Dhatus at all. This Ayurveda principle can help us to answer many yet unanswered questions in modern allopathy. Like – why in typhoid fever all the organs are involved and why in azoospermia no other organ is involved. The Upanishads talk about formation of Dhatus in much more detail. According to them, different types of foods make different types of Dhatus. Fiery foods like oil and ghee are responsible for formation of Karmendriyan (part of shukra), bone and bone marrow (Dhatu). The earthy foods are responsible for formation of Gnanandriyan and Manas (shukra) and muscle (flesh) and water in food is responsible for formation of Rasa and Rakta (plasma and blood) and Pran (Shukra). This means that every different type of food would make different types of Dhatus and a balanced food with a combination of fire, water and earth will only be responsible for formation of shukra, immunity or the essence.

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Smile is a sign of joy while hug is a sign of love. Laughter on the other hand is a sign of inner happiness.

Neither of them are at the level of mind or intellect. All come from within the heart. They are only the gradations of your expressions of your happiness.

It is said you are incomplete in your dress if you are not wearing a smile on your face.

Hug comes next… and laughter the last. Laughter is like an internal jogging and has benefits similar to meditation.

But be careful we must know when not to laugh. The most difficult is to laugh on oneself.

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5 steps to lower Alzheimer’s risk (HealthBeat)

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off

• Maintain a healthy weight.

• Check your waistline.

• Eat mindfully. Emphasize colorful, vitamin-packed vegetables and fruits; whole grains; fish, lean poultry, tofu, and beans and other legumes as protein sources plus healthy fats. Cut down on unnecessary calories from sweets, sodas, refined grains like white bread or white rice, unhealthy fats, fried and fast foods and mindless snacking. Keep a close eye on portion sizes, too.

• Exercise regularly. Aim for 2½ to 5 hours weekly of brisk walking (at 4 mph). Or try a vigorous exercise like jogging (at 6 mph) for half that time.

• Keep an eye on important health numbers. In addition to watching your weight and waistline, keep a watch on your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and blood sugar numbers.

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Liver

Beef

Chicken

Eggs

Whole milk

Fortified milk

Carrots

Mangoes

Orange fruits

Sweet potatoes

Spinach, kale, and other green vegetables

Eating at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day is recommended in order to provide a comprehensive distribution of carotenoids.

A variety of foods, such as breakfast cereals, pastries, breads, crackers, and cereal grain bars, are often fortified with 10–15% of the RDA of vitamin A.

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