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Dr K K Aggarwal

Sangat and smoking

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Sewa, Simran and Sangat are the three principles of life as per the most Vedic literature. Even Adi Shankaracharya described Sangat as the main force for living a spiritual life.

Sangat is the company of people you live with. Living in the company of good people makes one good and the reverse is also true.

The same is now being proved in the allopathic context. A new research published in the New England Journal of Medicine has shown that when one person quits smoking, than others are likely to follow. One person quitting can cause a ripple effect, making others more likely to kick the habit.

1. If your spouse stops smoking, you’re 67% less likely to continue smoking.

2. If your friend kicks the habit, it’s about 36% less likely that you’ll be smoking.

3. When a sibling gives up cigarettes, your risk of smoking decreases by 25%.

4. Your risk of smoking drops by 34 percent if a co-worker in a small office quits smoking. It’s sort of like watching dominoes. If one falls, it very quickly causes others to fall.

People should be treated in groups, rather than as individuals. Friends and family need to be involved. If you want to quit, try to get close friends and family to quit as well.

Quitting smoking may have the side benefit of improving social well-being, just as it improves physical health.

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Positive Attitudes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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All those out there who feel you are at your wits end wondering how things don’t ever work out for you, can now relax and dwell on all those failures that life has taken you through and turn failure into success.

1. Failure doesn’t mean you are a failure. But it does mean you haven’t succeeded yet.

2. Failure doesn’t mean you have accomplished nothing. It does mean you have learned something.

3. Failure doesn’t mean you have been foolish. It does mean you had a lot of faith.

4. Failure doesn’t mean you’ve been discouraged. It does mean you were willing to try.

5. Failure doesn’t mean you don’t to do. It does mean you have to do it in a different way.

6. Failure doesn’t mean you are inferior. It does mean you are not perfect.

7. Failure doesn’t mean you have wasted your life. It does mean you have a reason to start afresh.

8. Failure doesn’t mean you should give up. It does mean you must try harder.

9. Failure doesn’t mean you’ll never make it. It does mean it will take a little longer.

10. Failure doesn’t mean God has abandoned you. It does mean God has a better idea.

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Nail Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Nails can harbor dirt and germs and contribute to the spread of many infections. Infections of the finger nails or toe nails are often characterized by swelling of the skin or thickening of the nail. In some cases these infections may be serious and need to be treated by a doctor.

• Keep nails short.

• Trim nails often.

• Scrub the underside of nails with soap and water each time you wash your hands.

• Clean any nail grooming tools before use.

• Nail grooming tools should be sterilized before use in saloon.

• Avoid biting or chewing nails.

• Avoid cutting cuticles as they act as barriers to prevent infection.

• Never rip or bite a hang nail, instead clip it with a clear sterilized nail trimmer. A hang nail is small torn piece of skin next to finger or toe nail.

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Ganesha, the Stress Management Guru

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If Lord Krishna was the first counselor who taught the principles of counseling, Lord Ganesha taught us the principles of stress management.

We should worship Lord Ganesha and become like him whenever we face any difficulty or are stressed out.

The elephant head of Lord Ganesha symbolizes that when in difficulty, use your wisdom, intelligence and think differently. It can be equated to the Third Eye of Lord Shiva. Elephant is supposed to be the most intelligent animal in the kingdom. Here, wisdom means to think before speaking. Lord Buddha also said that don’t speak unless it is necessary and is truthful and kind.

The big elephant ears of Lord Ganesha signify listening to everybody when in difficulty. Elephant ears are known to hear long distances. Elephant eye see a long distance and in terms of mythology, it denotes acquiring the quality of foreseeing when in difficulty. The mouth of Lord Ganesha represents speaking less and hearing and listening more.

The big tummy of Lord Ganesha represents digesting any information gathered by listening to people in difficulty. The trunk denotes using the power of discrimination to decide from the retained information. It also indicates doing both smaller and bigger things by yourself. The elephant trunk can pick up a needle as well as a tree.

The teeth, broken and unbroken, signify to be in a state of balance in loss and gain. This implies that one should not get upset if the task is not accomplished and also not get excited if the task is accomplished. In times of difficulty, Ganesha also teaches us not to lose strength and control one’s attachments, desires and greed.

The four arms of Lord Ganesha represent strength. Ropes in two hands indicate attachment; Laddoo or Sweet in one hand represents desires and mouse represents greed. Riding over the mouse indicates controlling one’s greed.

Lord Ganesha is worshipped either when a new work is initiated or when one finds it difficult to complete a job or work. In these two situations, these principles of Lord Ganesha need to be inculcated in one’s habits

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Eating Out Tips

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Curb portions: Always order for one if you are two people and if you are alone set aside some of what is on your plate to bring home.

• Resist refined carbohydrates.

• Load your plate with colorful choices at the salad bar with vegetables, fruits and small amounts of lean protein. Skip the creamy dressings.

• Choose dishes that are grilled, roasted, steamed, or sautéed.

• Don’t be afraid to request a salad, vegetables, or fruit instead of starchy side dishes.

• If you are a non–vegetarian, order only fish or seafood.

• If you decide to have dessert, share it with your dining companion(s).

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Mindfulness meditation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Sit on a straight–backed chair or cross–legged on the floor. • Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling as you inhale and exhale.

• Once you have narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations and ideas.

• Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

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Check your BMI to know your risk of future heart attack

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If you are less than 40 years of age, male, with a strong family history of diabetes, blood pressure or heart disease, have a normal weight as judged by body mass index (BMI) but have a pot belly, or have gained more than 10 kg since the age 18, do not ignore this and go to your cardiologist to reduce your chances of a future heart attack.

A BMI of 20 to 23 kg/m2 is associated with little or no increased risk unless visceral fat is high, or the subject has gained more than 10 kg since 18 years.

1. Subjects with a BMI of 23 to 30 kg/m2 may be described as having low risk, while those with a BMI of 30 to 35 kg/m2 are at moderate risk. 2. Subjects with a BMI of 35 to 40 kg/m2 are at high risk, and those with a BMI above 40 kg/m2 are at very high risk from their obesity. 3. At any given level of BMI, the risk to health is increased by more abdominal fat (increased weight to hip ratio, WHR), hyperlipidemia, hypertension, age less than 40 years, male sex, and a strong family history of diabetes, hypertension, or heart disease.

The body mass index (BMI) is the most practical way to evaluate the degree of obesity. It is calculated from the height and weight as follows:

BMI = body weight (in kg) ÷ square of stature (height, in meters)

Overweight is defined as a BMI between 23 and 30 kg/m2 and obesity as a BMI greater than 30 kg/m2.

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Music as a Drug

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off

Our body is the largest pharmaceutical group in the world and has the capacity to heal each and every disease. The very fact that there is a receptor for every drug in the body means that the body has the capacity to produce that drug. Music is one such modality, which can heal by initiating various chains of chemical reactions in the body.

• Chanting vowels produces interleukin-2 in the body, which works like a painkiller.

• Chanting nasal consonants produces tranquilizers in the body.

• Sounds like LUM are associated with fear, VUM with attachments, RUM with doubt, YUM with love, HUM with truthfulness and AUM with non–judgmental.

• Various chemicals can be produced in the body by chanting of various vowels and consonants.

• Nasal consonants are vibrant sounds and produce vibrations of the autonomic plexus causing balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic states. More the nasal consonants in music, the more will be its relaxing healing power.

• Listening to overtone chanting in music can also heal people in the vicinity of the music.

• Recitation of music can also increase or decrease the respiratory rate of the singer. Lyrics, which reduce respiratory rate will lead to parasympathetic healing activity. The respiratory rate of a listener too can increase and decrease if he is absorbed in the song.

• Listening to a song word by word and by understanding its meaning can also change the biochemistry of the listener. A song can create an excitement or a feeling of depression.

• A song can also work like intent by speaking in the form of prayers. Group prayers can have powerful affects and convert intent into reality through the concept of spontaneous fulfillment of desire.

• Music is often linked with dance, both classical and western, which provides additional healing.

• Gestures, mudras, bhavs and emotions associated with songs produce parasympathetic state in both the singer and the listener.

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