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Dr K K Aggarwal

‘Food is Brahman’ is a saying from the Vedic Upanishad and Bhagavad Gita. Brahma is consciousness, therefore, food is consciousness. Though the traditional Vedic teaching has been that consciousness is present in everything and yet only food is considered Brahman. We never say that stone is Brahman nor dog is Brahman. As per Chandogya Upanishad (6.15.1) at the time of death, our Vak Vritti (motor senses) merges into Karm Indriyas or manovritti (sensory senses, mind, intellect, ego and memory) and that now merges with Prana (Udana Vayu) and finally this merges into Tejas which leaves the body to merge into the Sat. Vak Vritti, Manovritti and Prana Vritti, in the form of vibrations in the atmosphere, come back through rain and are taken by the plants to become plant consciousness. Therefore, as per Chandogya Upanishad, the consciousness of the Brahman moves from human to plants and plants to human. The plant food once eaten and absorbed enters into the human body and ultimately makes Prana, Tejas, Ojas, Sperms and Ova. Through Sperm and Ova, it enters into the next life. If this theory is correct, then food makes the consciousness and consciousness makes food. This also further proves that vegetarian food, as it is full of Brahman creating a satvik mind and takes one towards spirituality. The Tamsik food which is dead and devoid of consciousness does not lead to a healthy mind as it may produce Mal (waste) or make flesh but will not make essence. As per Chandogya Upanishad, fiery food makes Karma Indriyas, earthy food makes Gnan Indriyas and Water in food makes Prana. It further emphasizes on the fact that one should eat freshly cut fruits and vegetables as far as possible as life or consciousness in them can only stay for some time (as per Jainism up to 48 minutes).

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The best gift to your grandparents is to get them vaccinated if they have not been vaccinated earlier. • Annual influenza or flu vaccine is recommended for all persons aged 6 months and older. • Pneumonia vaccine should be given to all adults aged 65 years and older. • Tetanus Toxoid should be given to all irrespective of age after every 10 years. • A single dose of herpes zoster vaccine is recommended for adults aged 60 years and older regardless whether they have had a previous episode of herpes zoster. The vaccination begins at 60 years of age. • Hepatitis B vaccine should be given to all if they have not been vaccinated earlier. • All diabetics aged 60 years or older should be vaccinated for hepatitis B. This recommendation is based on increased need for associated blood glucose monitoring in long term care facilities. • All patients with chronic liver diseases should also be given the Hepatitis B vaccine.

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All about Diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | No Comments»

• Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented, and both types 1 and 2 diabetes can be managed to prevent complications

• India may soon be the diabetic capital of the world.

• People with diabetes are nearly two times more likely than people without diabetes to die from heart disease, and are also at greater risk for kidney, eye and nerve diseases, among other painful and costly complications. Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented, and both types 1 and 2 diabetes can be managed to prevent complications.

• In type 1 diabetes, the body does not make insulin. In type 2 diabetes the body makes insufficient insulin or does not use insulin well.

• Gestational diabetes occurs in some women during pregnancy. Though it usually goes away after the birth, these women and their children have a greater chances of getting type 2 diabetes later in life.

• Type 2 diabetes has begun to affect young people.

• Losing a modest amount of weight — about 15 pounds — through diet and exercise can actually reduce your risk of getting type 2 diabetes by as much as 58 percent in people at high risk.

• In type 1 diabetes, tight control of blood sugar can prevent diabetes complications.

• Choose healthy foods to share. • Take a brisk walk every day.

• Talk with your family about your health and your family’s risk of diabetes and heart disease.

• If you smoke, seek help to quit.

• Make changes to reduce your risk for diabetes and its complications — for yourself, your families and for future generations.

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The vibrations of the ringing bell also produce the auspicious primordial sound ‘Om’, thus creating a connection between the deity and the mind. As we start the daily ritualistic worship (pooja), we ring the bell, chanting:

Aagamaarthamtu devaanaam

gamanaarthamtu rakshasaam

Kurve ghantaaravam tatra

devataahvaahna lakshanam

“I ring this bell indicating the invocation of divinity, So that virtuous and noble forces enter (my home and heart); And the demonic and evil forces from within and without, depart.”

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Two Hindu principles that symbolize the outcome of freedom of thought were conceptualized four thousand years back by unnamed rishis in Rig–Veda which says, “This world is one family” (Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam) and that “The Universal Reality is the same, but different people can call it by different names” (Ekam Sat Vipra Bahuda Vadanti). In these two statements made in ancient Hindu India, we see the seeds of globalization and freedom of thought. Most religions teach belief in One God. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are, in fact, Semitic religions essentially speaking of One God. Even Hinduism that talks of many gods, in its highest form speaks only of One God. This was defined in the Sanskrit verse in the Rig Veda: “Ekam Sat vipra bahuda vadanti” (The Truth is One, but scholars call it by many names.) “Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam” defines that you and me are not different from each other and we are the part of the same web of life. The same spirit is shared by you and me and we are just the two sides of the same coin. And hence, it adds on to say, how can there be any conflict between us? The truth is one, but is perceived differently because different people are at different levels of evolution in spiritual terms. Everybody perceives it with their level of understanding and perception. For an uneducated village society even an entry of intelligent person in the village will be perceived as of GOD. Vedanta upholds the reality of this indivisible, immanent and transcendent truth called Spirit. Vedanta denotes one’s identity with the rest of humanity. According to it, there is no stranger in this world. Everyone is related to one another in the kinship of the Spirit. In Vedanta, there is no ‘I’ and “for me”; but is ‘ours’ and ‘for us’; and ultimately ‘His’ and “Him”. If the Vedanta philosophy is rightly followed upon, it will obliterate all evils. It is the science of right living and it is not the sole monopoly of the Hindus. It is for all and it has no quarrel with any religion. It preaches universal principles and Vedanta is the only universal, and eternal religion. It is a great leveller and it unites all, giving room to all.

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Unnecessary screening can have a considerable cost beyond that of the test itself, warn members of an ad hoc committee convened by the American College of Physicians. Screening tests should be performed judiciously, and the committee has assembled a list of common clinical situations in which more testing is unlikely to be helpful and may be harmful, writes Amir Qaseem, MD, PhD, MHA, from the ACP, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and colleagues in the January 17, 2012 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. ACP committee has identified 37 clinical scenarios in which screening does not promote patient health, and might even have adverse consequences. Those related to cardiac scenarios: • Performing coronary angiography in patients with chronic stable angina who have well–controlled symptoms on medical therapy, or who lack specific high–risk criteria on exercise testing • Routinely repeating echocardiography in asymptomatic patients with mild mitral regurgitation and normal left ventricular size and function • Obtaining ECG to screen for cardiac disease in patients at low to average risk for coronary artery disease. • Obtaining exercise electrocardiogram (ECG) for screening low–risk, asymptomatic adults

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• Know your strengths • According to a British study, only about one–third of people have a useful understanding of their strengths. • If something comes easily, you may take it for granted and not identify it as a strength. • If you are not sure, ask someone you respect and who knows you well, by noticing what people compliment you on, and by thinking about what comes most easily to you. • Strengths which are most closely linked to happiness are gratitude, hope, vitality, curiosity, and love. • Strengths are so important that they’re worth cultivating and applying in your daily life, even if they don’t come naturally to you.

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Seven heart–healthy behaviors can reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease. In a prospective study, by Enrique Artero, PhD, of the University of South Carolina, and colleagues and published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, those who met 3–4 of the American Heart Association’s ‘Simple Seven’ heart–health criteria had a 55% lower risk of cardiovascular mortality than those who met no more than two of those practices over 11 years. Four core behaviors 1. No smoking 2. Normal body mass index 3. Engaging in physical activity 4. Eating healthfully Three parameters 1. Cholesterol lower than 200 mg/dL 2. Blood pressure lower than 120/80 mm Hg 3. Not having diabetes

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