Using effervescent, dispersible or soluble drugs on a regular basis leads to greater risk for heart attacks, strokes, and other cardiovascular events. Regular use of prescribed effervescent and other sodium-containing drugs have a 16% greater risk for nonfatal stroke, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) and vascular death compared with regular users of low or no-sodium versions of the same drug as per a study reported in the BMJ by Dr Jacob George, at the University of Dundee in Scotland. Taking the maximum daily dose of drugs like effervescent aspirin or acetaminophen may exceed the recommended daily limit of sodium. Effervescent paracetamol 500 mg can contain 18.6 mmol of sodium in each tablet. Sodium-loaded effervescent, soluble or dispersible tablets should be avoided in patients at risk of hypertension. Current US guidelines recommend that people at low risk for CVD events limit their sodium intake to no more than 2,300 mg (1 teaspoon or 100 mmol/L) per day. Certain populations, including people over 50, African Americans, diabetics, and people with high blood pressure or chronic kidney disease, should limit their daily sodium intake to 1,500 mg. American Heart Association recommends intake of less than 1,500 mg of sodium a day for everyone. World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations call for limiting daily sodium intake to no more than 2,000 mg per day.

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