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Dr K K Aggarwal

DPP–4 inhibitors not linked to increased heart attack risk:

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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DPP–4 inhibitors not linked to increased heart attack risk: The Wall Street Journal reported that research published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that DPP–4 inhibitors may not be linked to an increased heart attack risk.

Extreme exercise may not pose danger to heart: The Wall Street Journal reported that a study of Tour de France cyclists found that they had longer lives than the general population and were less likely to die from heart troubles.

Faster heart attack care has not led to better in–hospital survival: USA Today reported that research published in the New England Journal of Medicine indicates that while hospitals have “shaved 16 minutes off the time it takes to get heart attack patients into treatment from 2005–2006 to 2008–2009, reducing that time from 83 minutes to 67 minutes,” investigators “found that the percentage of heart attack patients who die while in the hospital, about 5%, hasn’t changed.”

Gut bacteria may play role in determining weight: The investigators found that mice who received bacteria from the obese twin became fat, while the mice who received bacteria from lean individuals remained lean.

CDC: One in four deaths from cardiovascular disease preventable: USA Today reported currently, there are approximately 800,000 deaths annually in the US from cardiovascular disease, but about 200,000 of these deaths “could be prevented if people made healthy changes including stopping smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, doing more physical activity, eating less salt and managing their high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

What is the difference between smile, hug and laugh?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Smile is a sign of joy, while hug is a sign of love. Laughter on the other hand is a sign of inner happiness. None of them are at the level of mind or intellect. All come from within the heart.

They are only the gradations of your expressions of your happiness.

It is said you are incomplete in your dress if you are not wearing smile on your face. Hug comes next and laughter the last.

Laughter is like an internal jogging and has benefits like that of doing meditation.

But be careful we must know when not to laugh. The most difficult is to laugh on oneself.

Prevention strategy relies on lifestyle

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Stenting may not always be the answer to treating heart disease with stable coronary artery disease.

A German study has shown that patients with stable coronary artery disease who were put on an exercise regimen had significantly higher rates of event-free survival than those who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In the study, 70% of patients in the exercise program had event-free survival — no stroke, heart attack, or death — compared with 50% of stented patients after four years.

Exercise is an important part of any type of prevention, and it should be instituted for “anyone with stable coronary heart disease.”

The study on stenting versus exercise come was a continuation of a pilot study first reported in 2004 in the journal Circulation. That study of 101 male patients found that after one year, 88% of patients who exercised had event-free survival compared with 70% of stented patients.

The updated data reflect an additional 100 patients, who performed moderate intensity exercise for two weeks under hospital supervision, and then were given an exercise bike to continue their regimen at home.

Patients with stable angina exercised at 80% of their threshold, and that after four weeks of exercising, their angina threshold increased.

The clear message for patients is to get 30 to 60 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity every day, noting that 30% of heart disease could be prevented by 2.5 hours of walking per week.

Search for happiness in the present moment

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Happiness should not be considered as being synonymous with pleasure. Pleasure is transient and is always associated with pain later. Any transient addiction to any of the five senses will either lead to pleasure or pain. Pleasure leads to attachment resulting in more intense and greater desires, and if these are not fulfilled, they cause pain which manifest as anger, irritability or even a physical disease. This type of transient pleasure is chosen by the individuals who attach themselves not to the actions only, but also to its results.

The soul, which is an energized field of information and energy, is controlled by the person’s action, memory and desire. With every action, a memory is created which either gets stored or is recirculated again as an action. If one does not control the desires, the recurrent actions may cause more problems than happiness.

True happiness, on the other hand, is internal happiness or the happiness of the soul or of the consciousness. It is often said, “You are what you eat; you are what you think; and you are what you do.” Hence, your own internal happiness will vary with what you eat, think, and do.

Living in the present moment leads to true happiness. If one is constantly lamenting about the past or fearing the future, he/she will never be able to live in the present. Not living in the present is bound to cause unhappiness. One should learn to live and enjoy the present which can only be done by attaching oneself to the actions and not to its results.

Doing one’s duty with devotion and discipline helps one to remain in the present. Performing good action is important, but it is equally important to maintain the purity of the mind at the same time. Because any intention in the thought creates the same chemical reaction as when the actual deed is done, abusing a person in thought is the same as abusing him in person. Cultivating positive actions in day-to-day life, like, giving or sharing etc., helps in acquiring internal happiness.

Thoughts ultimately get metabolized into various chemicals and hormones changing the internal biochemistry of the person; hence by thinking about cancer all the time, one can actually induce it over a period of time. And similarly, cancers can be cured by thinking positive over a period of time.

Internal happiness gives a deep feeling of satisfaction and is not associated with any transient chemical changes which are generally associated with bodily pleasure activities. People who are internally happy are always contented and are devoid of jealousy, anger, irritability, greed and ego.

One should learn to disassociate from, both, external pain as well as pleasure, and only then can one acquire true internal happiness.

Salt restriction increases efficacy of RAAS blockade

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Eggs do not have an adverse effect on lipid levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Researchers also found that an egg-rich diet for 3 months was associated with better appetite control and may provide greater satiety. “These findings suggest that a high egg diet can be included safely as part of the dietary management of patients with type 2 diabetes,” remarked Nicholas Fuller, PhD, from the Boden Institute Clinical Trials Unit, University of Sydney, Australia.

The Right Action

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Dharma is the path of righteousness and living one’s life according to the codes of conduct as described by the Vedas and Upanishads. Its western equivalents might include morality, ethics, virtue, righteousness and purity. The term dharma can best be explained as the “law of being” without which things cannot exist.

The word dharma is derived from dhri, which means “to hold”. It literally means “that which holds” the people of this world and the whole creation. The same is described in the Vedic Text, in Atharva Veda as: Prithivim dharmana dhritam, i.e. “this world is upheld by dharma”.

In Hinduism, Dharma is the very foundation of life. Tulsidas, the author of Ramcharitmanas, defined the root of dharma as compassion. Buddha has also described this principle in his book Dhammapada. According to Hindu philosophy, it’s GOD who holds us through “Truth” and/or “Love”. “Dharma prevails” or “truth prevails” is the essence of Hinduism.

In order to achieve good karma, Vedas teach that one should live according to dharma (the right action). This involves doing what is right for the individual, the family, the class or caste and also for the universe.

According to the Bhagavat Purana, righteous living or life on a dharmic path has four pillars: truthfulness (satya), austerity (tap), purity (shauch) and compassion (daya). It further adds that the adharmic or unrighteous life has three main vices: pride (ahankar), bad company (sangh), and intoxication (madya).

Manusmriti prescribes ten essential rules for the observance of dharma: Patience (dhriti), forgiveness (kshama), piety or self control (dama), honesty (asteya), sanctity (shauch), control of senses (indriya-nigrah), reason (dhi), knowledge or learning (vidya), truthfulness (satya) and absence of anger (krodha). Manu further writes, “Non-violence, truth, non-coveting, purity of body and mind, control of senses are the essence of dharma”.

In Bhagwad Gita, Lord Krishna says that in the society dharma is likely to fall from time to time, and to bring dharma back, a GOD representative is born from time to time.

The shloka “parithraanaaya saadhoonaam vinaasaaya cha dhushkr.thaam| dharma-samsthaapanaarthaaya sambhavaami yuge yuge” (Chapter IV – 8)” says that “For the protection of the virtuous, for the destruction of evil-doers, and for establishing the rule of righteousness (Dharma), I am born from age to age [in every age]”. Another shloka “yada yada hi dharmasya glanir bhavati bharata abhyutthanam adharmasya tadatmanam srjamy aham” means that O descendant of Bharata “Whenever and wherever there is a decline in religious practice, and a predominant rise of irreligion – at that time I descend Myself”.

Deepak Chopra in his book Seven Spiritual Laws of Success talks about the “Law of ‘Dharma’ or Purpose in Life’”. According to him, everybody should discover his or her divinity, find the unique talent and serve humanity with it. With this, one can generate all the wealth that one wants.

According to him, when your creative expressions match the needs of your fellow humans, then wealth will spontaneously flow from the un-manifest into the manifest, from the realm of spirit to the world of form. In spiritual terms this is an attempt to find out whether one’s life is progressing as per the Laws of Dharma (Dharma in Sanskrit means ‘purpose in life’) which, according to the scriptures, is said to be the sole purpose for a human being to manifest in this physical form.

For one to achieve ‘DHARMA’ he suggests the following affirmative exercises:

  • Today I will lovingly nurture the god or goddess in embryo form that lies deep within my soul. I will pay attention to the spirit within me that animates both my body and my mind. I will awaken myself to this deep stillness within my heart. I will carry this consciousness of timeless, eternal being in the midst of time-bound experiences.
  • I will make a list of my unique talents. Then I will list all of the things I love to do while expressing my unique talents. When I express my unique talents and use them in the service of humanity, I lose track of time and create abundance in my life as well as in the lives of others.
  • I will ask myself daily, ‘How can I serve?’ and ‘How can I help?’ The answers to these questions will allow me to help and serve my fellow human beings with love.

Karma, dharma and samsara are three fundamental aspects of Hinduism. Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism are all built on these aspects. Dharma is one’s appropriate role or attributes. Karma measures how well one performs one’s dharma, explains why one is born where he or she is, and why there is suffering and seeming injustices. Samsara is the continuous cycle of birth, death and rebirth, and the context for all experience.

Dharma sutras from Dharma Shãstras are the basic texts which talks about the morality of individuals and the society. Most Indian laws are made from these Shãstras.

In Jainism also, the wheel of Dharma (Chakra) with 24 spokes represents the religion preached by the 24 Tirthankaras consisting of nonviolence (Ahimsa) and other virtues.

The very first word of the Gita is “Dharma”. The Gita concludes with the word “Mama”. The whole of Bhagavad Gita is contained in the two words ‘Mama’ and ‘Dharma’. When you join these two words it becomes mamadharma, meaning ‘your true Dharma’. This is what the Gita teaches. ‘What is your Dharma?’

How to achieve your dharma?

  • Do unto others what you do unto yourself and satisfy your conscience. That is your Dharma.
  • The word ‘Living Dharma’ signifies right action in every moment of the life.
  • Do not follow the dictates of body, and do not indiscriminately follow the mind, for the mind is like a mad monkey. Hence, follow the conscience.

Keys to a healthy diet

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  • Choose mostly plant-based foods that are unprocessed or minimally processed.
  • Eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains over the course of the week in order to ensure a balance of important nutrients.
  • Watch portion size and keep your calorie intake and physical activity level in balance.

Understanding the concept of Shiva and Shakti

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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After the life force leaves the body even the wife does not like to come near the body (Bhaja Govindam). This life force has no weight, water cannot wet it, air cannot dry it, and weapons cannot cut it (Bhagwad Gita Chapter 2).

The scientific description of this life force comes from the first Maha Vakya, from Aitareya Upanishad in Rig Veda, which describes that “Consciousness or Intelligence is the Brahman (Pragnanam Brahma).

This life force or the intelligence represents the conscious energy, energized consciousness or energized information.

In computer language, this intelligence is both the data that has been fed and the software to operate this data. The software is driven by the power of intention and by the process of attention.

In Vedic language the data is the “Purusha or Shiva” and the software the “Shakti” (Sakti). While the data or the Shiva is inactive and idle, without Shakti or energy, the data has no value and it makes” Shiva” a “SAVA”. When Shakti moves toward Shiva it becomes awareness or consciousness. In Vedanta language, it is called as soul or Brahman.

For comparison, what relationship Matter and Energy have in Physics; Purusha and Prakruti in Samkya Philosophy; Infinite and Zero in Mathematics; Potential and Kinetic Energy in Energetics; Meaning and Word in Linguistics; Father and Mother in sociology, the same is with Shiva and Sakti in understanding the mystery of Vedanta.

Shiva and Sakti are thus two inseparable entities in Indian mysticism. Just as moonlight cannot be separated from the moon, Shakti cannot be separated from Shiva. Kashmir Shaivism says that “Shiva without Shakti is lifeless (Sava) because wisdom cannot move without power”.

Shiva and Shakti are different from the masculine and feminine aspects of the human body. In tantric spiritual path, one seeks to develop a perfect harmony and balance between masculine aspects (example mental focus, will, intellect) and feminine aspects (example sensitivity, emotion).

Shiva or the data is classified in the body in three subgroups: creation, protection and destruction. These in Hindu mythology are called “Brahma, Vishnu and Mahesh”. Some 1add another two more dimensions in them making them five and these are “revelation and concealment”. One can find these qualities in anything that’s alive.

The Shakti or the forces (power) are also sub classified in five sub types.

  1. Chitta Shakti: Pure consciousness or the awareness of God.
  2. Ananda Shakti or pure bliss.
  3. Gnana Shakti or the ‘knowledge of God’. It is pure knowledge, which organizes and orchestrates the infinite correlative activity of the universe.
  4. Kriya Shakti or ‘pure action’ which is the actions directed toward God (action which does not have the bondage of karma. Action which has the bondage of karma comes from the ego. It’s based on beliefs and expectations and interpretations and fears and judgments and past memories, whereas non-binding action, which is non-Karmic, is called Kriya—action rooted in pure awareness and creativity)
  5. Desire (Ichcha Shakti: the desire or intention to unite with God)

Deepak Chopra in his Book, Path of Love Describes Shakti as under:

If the voice of God spoke to you, Her powers would be conveyed in simple, universal phrases:

  • Chitta Shakti: “I am.”
  • Ananda Shakti: “I am blissful.”
  • Gnana (Gyana) Shakti: “I know.”
  • Kriya Shakti: “I act.”
  • Icha Shakti: “I will” or “I intend.”

These powers, if used towards acquiring spiritual wellbeing, any action (pure kriya) directed by the desire (pure iccha) leads to pure knowledge (pure gnana) and ends with internal bliss (ananda).

On the other hand, in routine life if these powers are governed by the ego, then the Action (Kriya) leads to Memory (Gnana) and the memory leads to desire (Icha) and then action again.

According to Tantra, Satchidananda is called Shiva-Sakti, the hyphenated word suggesting that Shiva or the Absolute and Sakti or its creative power, are eternally conjoined like a word and its meaning; the one cannot be thought of without the other.

India to host the 7th APHRS Scientific Session for the first time ever; one of the world’s largest gatherings of Cardiac Electrophysiologists

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To be organized jointly by the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Indian Heart Rhythm Society (IHRS) in New Delhi from October 29th to November 1st 2014
New Delhi, October 27th, 2014: The APHRS Scientific Session, one of the world’s largest gatherings of Cardiac Electrophysiologists will be held in India for the first time ever this month. In it’s seventh edition, the annual conference organized by the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society will take place in conjunction with the Indian Heart Rhythm Society simultaneously in Hotel Taj Palace and Maurya in New Delhi from 29th October to 1st November, 2014.
The primary objective of the conference is to provide a platform to physicians, researchers and other partakers involved in the fields of arrhythmia and electro cardiology from across the world to come together and contribute in enhancing international academic exchange and development in this field under one roof. The highlight of this year’s conference will be the 200 scientific sessions being conducted by 250 core leading National and International faculty on topics such as ECGs, Sudden Cardiac Death, Atrial Fibiliration, Heart Failure, latest technological advancements in Cardiology amongst others
Speaking on the upcoming conference, Dr Mohan Nair, Chairman Organizing Committee, 7th Asia APHRS Scientific Session and Chairman Cardiology, Saket City Hospital said, “I am delighted to announce that the 7th APHRS Scientific Session, one of the most prestigious and largest gatherings of Cardiac Electrophysiologists in the world is going to take place in the National Capital this year.  A global conclave aimed at upholding excellence and advancement in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with heart rhythm disorders, the APHRS Scientific Session 2014 will be attended by nearly 1500 leading physicians, cardiologists and medical students this year. I thank all our partners and look forward to getting more such opportunities to India in the future.”
Adding to this, Dr Young-Hoon Kim, President APHRS said, “Started in 2008, APHRS takes place every year in different countries of the Asia Pacific Region. The reason behind scheduling these conferences in different countries is to provide an exchange of information related to not only arrhythmia and electro cardiology but also to put forward an apt platform for the exposure to the local culture which is rewardingly educational and deeply enriching. I am extremely excited about attending this conference in India amongst some of the leading global experts in the field”.
In the past APHRS has been organized in countries such as Hong Kong, Singapore, China, Korea, Japan, and Taiwan. Next year’s conference will take place in Melbourne, Australia during the month of November 2015.
A FEW CONFIRMED FACULTY

•    Dr KK Talwar – Chairman, Board of Governors, Medical Council of India
•    Dr T. S. Kler – Executive Director Cardiac Sciences and Electrophysiology at Fortis Escorts Heart Institute
•    Dr  KK Sethi – Chairman & MD, Delhi Heart and Lung Institute
•    Dr M Khalilullah – Founder, Heart Centre, New Delhi
•    Dr John Camm – Honorary consultant Cardiologist, St George’s Healthcare Trust, U.K
•    Dr Andrea Natale – Executive Medical Director, Texas Cardiac Arrhythmia Institute at St. David’s Medical Center USA
•    Dr Kalyanam Shivkumar – Director, Cardiac Arrhythmia Center, UCLA Medical Plaza, USA
•    Shih Ann Chen – Professor of Medicine, National Yang Ming School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
•    Dr Karl H Kuck – Chief of Staff Cardiology Asklepios Hospital St. Georg, Germany
•    Dr Sanjeev Saksena- Clinical Professor, Medicine at UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, USA
•    Dr Richard Fogel – President of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS)
•    Dr David Hayes – Prof of Medicine (Cardiac) USA
•    Dr Angelo Auricchio, President-elect of the European Heart Rhythm Association
•    Dr Jonathan Kalman – head of electrophysiology and arrhythmia department, Royal Melbourne Hospital

Harvard’s Medical School’s 4 Exercising Tips for People with Diabetes

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  1. Get a “preflight” check
    • Talk with your doctor before you start or change a fitness routine.
    • Especially if you are overweight or have a history of heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, or diabetic neuropathy.
    • Go for a complete physical exam and an exercise stress test if you are 35 or older and have had diabetes for more than 10 years. The results can help determine the safest way for you to increase physical activity.
  2. Spread your activity throughout the week
    • Adults should aim for a weekly total of at least 160 minutes of moderate aerobic activity, or 80 minutes of vigorous activity, or an equivalent mix of the two.
    • Be active at least 3 to 5 days a week.
  3. Time your exercise wisely
    • The best time to exercise is 1 to 3 hours after eating, when your blood sugar level is likely to be higher.
    • If you use insulin, it’s important to test your blood sugar before exercising. If it is below 100 mg/dL, eat a piece of fruit or have a small snack to boost it and help you avoid hypoglycemia. Test again 30 minutes later to see if your blood sugar level is stable.
    • Check your blood sugar after any particularly grueling workout or activity.
    • If you use insulin, your risk of developing hypoglycemia may be highest 6 to 12 hours after exercising.
    • Do not exercise if your blood sugar is too high (over 250).

Reflexology for Cancer Symptoms

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A study led by a Michigan State University researcher offers the strongest evidence yet that reflexology can help cancer patients manage their symptoms and perform daily tasks.

Funded by the National Cancer Institute and published in Oncology Nursing Forum, it is the first large-scale, randomized study of reflexology as a complement to standard cancer treatment, according to lead author Gwen Wyatt, a professor in the College of Nursing.

Reflexology is based on the idea that stimulating specific points on the feet can improve the functioning of corresponding organs, glands and other parts of the body.

The study involved 385 women undergoing chemotherapy or hormonal therapy for advanced-stage breast cancer that had spread beyond the breast. The women were assigned randomly to three groups: Some received treatment by a certified reflexologist, others got a foot massage meant to act like a placebo, and the rest had only standard medical treatment and no foot manipulation.

They found that those in the reflexology group experienced significantly less shortness of breath, a common symptom in breast cancer patients. Perhaps as a result of their improved breathing, they also were better able to perform daily tasks such as climbing a flight of stairs, getting dressed or going grocery shopping.

Also unexpected was the reduced fatigue reported by those who received the “placebo” foot massage, particularly since the reflexology group did not show similarly significant improvement. Wyatt is now researching whether massage similar to reflexology performed by cancer patients’ friends and family, as opposed to certified reflexologists, might be a simple and inexpensive treatment option.

Heart Attack Symptoms in Women and elderly are Different

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Winter is the month for heart attacks and the symptoms in women and the elderly may be different,

  • Chest pain is still the most common sign of a heart attack for most women but women are more likely than men to have symptoms other than chest pain or discomfort when experiencing a heart pain. In a study published in Archives of Internal Medicine, researchers examined 35 years of research that yielded 69 studies and found that 30-37% of women did not have chest discomfort during a heart attack. In contrast, 17-27% of men did not experience chest discomfort.
  • Older people are also more likely to have heart attack without chest discomfort. Absence of chest discomfort is a strong predictor for missed diagnosis and treatment delays.
  • Women are also more likely than men to experience other forms of cardiac chest pain syndromes, such as unstable angina, and they appear to report a wider range of symptoms associated with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). They are more likely to report pain in the middle or upper back, neck, or jaw; shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, indigestion, loss of appetite, weakness or fatigue, cough, dizziness and palpitations.
  • Women are, on an average, nearly a decade older than men at the time of their initial heart attack. Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death among U.S. women, and affects one in 10 women over the age of 18.

Why Spirituality is Happiness Friendly

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  1. What you believe in can have a big impact on health and longevity. People with high levels of religious beliefs or spirituality have lower cortisol responses. Cortisol is a hormone that is released in the body in response to stress.
  2. Positive thinking produces nearly a 30 percent drop in perception of pain.
  3. Spirituality and the practice of religion is associated with a slower progression of Alzheimer’s disease.
  4. Those who regularly attend organized religious activities may live longer than those who don’t. Regular participation lowers mortality rate by about 12 percent a year.
  5. People who are undergoing cardiac rehabilitation feel more confident and perceive greater improvements in their physical abilities if they have a strong faith.
  6. Increased levels of spirituality and religious faith may help substance abusers kick their habit.
  7. Spirituality stimulates the relaxation response. When the body is relaxed, your heart rate, blood pressure and breathing rate all go down, which decreases the body’s stress response.
  8. Spirituality can affect immune-system function. Spirituality, faith, church attendance improves immune function in ways that can be measured, like an increase in white blood cells.
  9. Prayer heals the heart. Positive talking and thinking in the ICU produces better results.
  10. Spirituality is what brings you peace and safety. It can be achieved through God or Goddess, nature, a beautiful sunset, a meditation, Pranayama, religious meeting, chanting, mind body relaxation, etc. Spirituality is something that can help all the way from promoting wellness to helping with recovery.

Children and adolescents with congenital heart disease should avoid body piercing

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Children and teenagers with congenital heart disease should be strongly discouraged from getting a tattoo or piercing their ears or other body parts, because it could lead to a potentially deadly infection of the heart called endocarditis

Infective endocarditis occurs when bacteria or fungi attach on the valves of the heart and begin to grow. If left untreated, it can lead to a fatal destruction of heart muscle.

Most people are not aware that they should talk to their doctor before tattooing or piercing their body.

Body art in the form of tattoos and piercing has become increasingly popular among children and teenagers.

Most experts today strongly discourage all forms of body art. For those who cannot be dissuaded, the recommendation is to give antibiotics prior to tattooing or piercing, “with strong advice for prompt treatment of any signs of subsequent infection”.

Vedic Science behind running post- traumatic stress disorder?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD is a stress disorder, which lasts for up to 2 weeks if handled properly and for months or years if not handled after an acute stress. It can be a serious disorder.

The acute stress after the death of somebody very close will be called acute traumatic stress and the condition as PTSD.

The reference to grieving people mourning a death can be found in the Vedic literature. There is custom that the grieved partner is made to weep till she or he is overwhelmed with emotions. In fact, all relatives and friends participate in the exercise, depending upon their respective closeness to the deceased.

Most relatives join in the antim yatra and after that the grieved person is made to sit for 90 minutes every day as a part of the ceremony which either ends on chautha or tervi where again everybody known gather together to end the ceremony. Thereafter, normal activities of life are resumed.

In some sections of the society there is also a custom of shaving the head or doing ‘daan’ of hairs and or wearing white clothes.

There is a scientific explanation behind these customs?

The plausible explanation are many and are based on the observation that a grieving person may go into depression which if not treated properly may last for months together, or even forever.