Sub Logo

Dr K K Aggarwal

Elderly should Beware of Commonly Prescribed Group of Drugs

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Elderly should Beware of Commonly Prescribed Group of Drugs

Anticholinergics, a commonly prescribed group of drugs, may cause elderly people to “slow down” in their daily physical activities.

Two reports from Wake Forest University School of Medicine support findings that anti-cholinergic drugs used to treat acid reflux, Parkinson’s disease and urinary incontinence may cause older people to lose their thinking skills more quickly than those who do not take the medicines.

Anticholinergic drugs work by stopping acetylcholine, a chemical that enhances communication between nerve cells in the brain, from binding to its receptors in nerve cells.

Older adults taking anticholinergics become more likely to walk more slowly and to need help in other daily activities. These results are true even in older adults who have normal memory and thinking abilities.

For older adults taking a moderately anticholinergic medication, or two or more mildly anticholinergic medications, their function is similar to that of someone three to four years older.

Common anticholinergic medicines include blood pressure medication, nifedipine; the stomach antacid, ranitidine, and the incontinence medication, tolterodine.

Cholinesterase inhibitors, a family of drugs used to treat dementia by increasing levels of acetylcholine include donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine and tacrine. About 10 percent of patients may be taking tolterodine and dozepezil together. The two drugs are pharmacological opposites, which led to the hypothesis that the simultaneous treatment of dementia and incontinence could lead to reduced effectiveness of one or both drugs.

Five Types of People from Nastik to Astik

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Five Types of People from Nastik to Astik

Following are the five types of people

  1. Nastik – the one who believes in God.
  2. Astik – for whom God exists.
  3. For them the God also exists in them (I and the God are the same)
  4. Tat tvam asi (God not only exists in me but also in you)
  5. God is in everybody

People who believe that God exists are fearful people and they always fear God. People who see God in themselves, live a disciplined Satvik life and do not indulge in activities which are not God-friendly.

People who believe that God is not only in me but also in you, treat every person the same way as they treat themselves.

People for whom God is everywhere always work for the welfare of the society.

What type of a vegetarian are you?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on What type of a vegetarian are you?

There are 4 main types of vegetarian diets:

  • Lacto–ovo–vegetarian consumes dairy products and eggs but no meat, poultry, or seafood
  • Lacto–vegetarian eats dairy products but not eggs, meat, poultry, or seafood
  • Ovo–vegetarian eats eggs but no dairy products, meat, poultry, or seafood
  • Vegan does not eat any animal products, including meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy products; many vegans will also avoid honey.

Vegetarian and plant–based diets are associated with a reduced risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer as well as increased longevity. Vegetarian diets are typically lower in fat, particularly saturated fats and higher in dietary fiber. They are also likely to include more whole grains, legumes, nuts, and soy protein, and together with the absence of red meat, this type of eating plan may provide many benefits for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic health problems, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Namkaran Sanskar

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Namkaran Sanskar

In India, a person is identified by his/her name, which usually is a reflection of his/her own family. It may contain not only your maiden name but also the name of your father and your surname/caste.

When you are born, you are usually given your special name, which you carry throughout your life unless it is changed for a specific purpose. For example, the surname may change after marriage or the in-laws may change the name, specifically, for a girl.

Artists often change their names to those which may reflect their profession. A classic example is Rajesh Khanna, who changed his name from Jatin to Rajesh, which was easier for the public to recall.

A name for a baby is chosen on any of the following grounds:

  • The priest as per the horoscope decides the sound present in the universe and that Akshar (Alphabet) is given to the family to pick up a name starting with that Akshar.
  • Sometimes, the name of the baby may be chosen depending upon the auspiciousness of the day he/she was born, e.g. a baby boy born on Krishna Janmashtami, may be named ‘Krishna’ by the family after Lord Krishna.
  • If the parents have vowed a Mannat to a deity, then they may name their child after one of the many names of that deity. For example, if parents have taken a Mannat from Vaishno Devi, their baby girl may be named for one of the forms of Goddess Durga or Parvati.
  • People may also choose similar names for their children, e.g. Ramesh, Mahesh, and Suresh.
  • People may also keep the name of the child in the form of known pairs. If the name of the first child is Luv, the parents may like to name the second child as Kush, especially when the parents have twins. Other examples are Karan Arjun, Sita and Gita etc.
  • Sometimes, parents name their child after their favorite celebrity. For example, if someone is a big fan of Sachin Tendulkar, he may name his child Sachin. Sachin himself was named after the noted Hindi film music director Sachin Dev Burman by his father, who was a great fan of SD Burman.

Name has a lot of significance as Akshar in Sanskrit has a vibration and if that positive vibration matches with the vibrations of universe at the time of your birth, it helps in healing.

Normally, it is expected that you live up to your name. For example, if your name is Durga, you are expected to know all about Ma Durga and try to adopt characteristics of Durga.

Therefore, everyone is expected to know the literal meaning of his or her name and try to follow a lifestyle that is consistent with your name. For example, if you are named Ram, you are not expected to act like Ravana.

Namkaran Sanskar or the naming ceremony is a complete ceremony and is one of the 16 sanskars. It is both a social and legal necessity. As the naming process creates a bond between the child and the rest of the community, it is considered auspicious.

Some people name their child before he/she is born but a Namkaran Sanskar is usually performed on the 12th day after birth but it may vary from religion to religion and custom to custom. The formal ritual involves a Namkaran puja, which is held at their home or a temple where the priest offers prayers to all the Gods, Navagrihas, five elements, Agni and the ancestors. The horoscope of a child is made and is placed in front of the idol of the deity for blessings. With the baby in the lap of the father, the chosen name of the child is whispered in the right ear.

Some people name the child on the 101st day of the birth; while some choose the first birthday to name their child.

The name of the child also entails certain etiquettes as it reflects a person. You cannot take the name of a person with disrespect. If you abuse a name it means you have abused a person.

Even Children Can Have Acidity

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Even Children Can Have Acidity

Children who have continuing recurrence of cough and croup could be suffering from stomach Reflux problems.

Croup or ‘Kali Khansi’ as it is called in local parlance, is recognized by a loud cough that often sounds like the barking of a seal. It can cause rapid or difficult breathing, and sometimes wheezing. Croup is thought to be caused by a virus, but reflux acidity has been suggested as a possible trigger.

In GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease, stomach acid causes swelling and inflammation of the larynx, which narrows the airway. It can trigger more swelling with any kind of viral or respiratory infection.

Identifying children with GERD could help treat and improve recurring croup. It is unusual for a child to have three or more bouts of croup over a short period of time. These children need to be evaluated.

The same is true for adults also. Patients with non responding asthma should be investigated for underlying acidity as the cause of acute asthma.

Even Children Can Have Acidity

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Even Children Can Have Acidity

Children who have continuing recurrence of cough and croup could be suffering from stomach Reflux problems.

Croup or ‘Kali Khansi’ as it is called in local parlance, is recognized by a loud cough that often sounds like the barking of a seal. It can cause rapid or difficult breathing, and sometimes wheezing. Croup is thought to be caused by a virus, but reflux acidity has been suggested as a possible trigger.

In GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease, stomach acid causes swelling and inflammation of the larynx, which narrows the airway. It can trigger more swelling with any kind of viral or respiratory infection.

Identifying children with GERD could help treat and improve recurring croup. It is unusual for a child to have three or more bouts of croup over a short period of time. These children need to be evaluated.

The same is true for adults also. Patients with non responding asthma should be investigated for underlying acidity as the cause of acute asthma.

The very purpose of life is to face sufferings

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on The very purpose of life is to face sufferings

According to Hinduism, the very fact we are born means that in our last life, we did not get liberation or Moksha. It also means that some sufferings in our last birth still remained. Therefore, the purpose of this birth is to face those sufferings.


When the purpose of our life is to face sufferings, why suffer from them?

This should be considered as ‘sukh’ and not ‘dukh’. As per Vedic literature, every diversity is an opportunity to learn or to do something different. The four notable principles of Buddhism also talk about the same. The first is that suffering exists, second that there is a reason for every suffering and third that it is possible to neutralize the suffering by understanding the 8 paths of cessation of suffering.

Also remember that in every ‘dukh’ you think of ‘sukh’ and in every ‘sukh’ you think of a ‘dukh’. Next time you have a problem, think differently and learn to enjoy them.

One of my industrialist friends was once ordered to go to Tihar Jail on a Friday night. He tried his level best and wanted to get admitted in the hospital for the weekend so that he could secure bail on Monday morning. I told him that whether he was in jail or in hospital, it would make no difference as far as his status was concerned. In both the situations, he would be listed as being in the jail on paper. So I told him to go to the jail and enjoy those 48 hours as a holiday. When he came back from the jail, he was a different person and learnt the principle of life which he otherwise could not have learnt.

First Aid in Burns

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on First Aid in Burns

  • Patients with severe thermal burns are at significant risk of death and major morbidity.
  • Look for evidence of respiratory distress and smoke inhalation injury, a common cause of death in the acute burn victim.
  • Laryngeal edema can develop suddenly and unexpectedly.
  • Burn depth and size determine fluid resuscitation and the need for transfer.
  • Vascular collapse from burn shock is a critical component.
  • Rapid, aggressive fluid resuscitation to reconstitute intravascular volume and maintain end–organ perfusion is crucial.
  • The fluid requirement during the initial 24 hours of treatment is 4 mL/kg of body weight for each percent of total body surface area burned, given IV. Superficial burns are excluded from this calculation. One-half of the calculated fluid need is given in the first 8 hours; the remaining half is given over the subsequent 16 hours.
  • It is important to monitor urine output. Hourly urine output should be maintained at 0.5 mL/kg in adults.
  • Burn patients may be exposed to carbon monoxide and require immediate treatment with high–flow oxygen.
  • Cool and clean wounds, but avoid inducing hypothermia.
  • Remove any jewelry and any hot or burned clothing and obvious debris not densely adherent to the skin.
  • Irrigation with cool water may be used.
  • Topical antibiotics are applied to all non superficial burns.
  • Give opioids (morphine) to treat pain and give tetanus prophylaxis.

Astik Vs Nastik

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Astik Vs Nastik

Traditionally, people believe that Nastik are people who do not go to temples or related places of worship. They also do not believe in God.

To differentiate between Astik and Nastik, we need to first understand the concept of Sanatan Dharma and Arya Samaj Dharma. People who believe in Sanatan Dharma consider God as separate from the self and worship him in the form of an idol. They believe in Dualism theory.

Arya Samaj followers do not do idol worship and believe in non–dualism and treat God and self as one.

Arya Samajis, therefore, will not go to a temple where the idols of Gods are placed. Being an Arya Samaji does not mean that the person is Nastik.

The word Nastik means someone who does not believe in God at all, therefore, he or she also does not believe in self as God is nothing but self. In medical sciences, these are the people who have no insight and will usually be suffering from depression and loss of self–esteem.

3 simple ways for a restful sleep

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on 3 simple ways for a restful sleep

  1. Cut down on caffeine: Caffeine drinkers may find it harder to fall asleep. Even a single cup of coffee in the morning may lead to a sleepless night. Caffeine blocks the effects of adenosine, a neurotransmitter thought to promote sleep. Caffeine can also interrupt sleep by increasing the need to urinate during the night. Because caffeine withdrawal can cause headaches, irritability, and extreme fatigue, it may be easier to cut back gradually rather than to go cold turkey. Those who can’t or don’t want to give up caffeine should avoid it after 2 pm, or noon if they are especially caffeine–sensitive.
  2. Stop smoking or chewing tobacco: Nicotine is a central nervous system stimulant that can cause insomnia. If you continue to use tobacco, avoid smoking or chewing it for at least one to two hours before bedtime.
  3. Limit alcohol intake: Alcohol depresses the nervous system, so a nightcap may seem to help some people fall asleep. Alcohol suppresses REM sleep, and the soporific effects disappear after a few hours. Alcohol also worsens snoring and other sleep breathing problems

Allopathic Medical Vrat

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Allopathic Medical Vrat

 

There was a time everybody in India, especially the women, used to observe regular fasts. In my childhood, I saw my mother not only observing fasts herself but also insisting upon my sisters to fast once a week, an extra fast once in a month and observe 2 Navratras in a year of 9 days each. This sums up to be around 80 fasts in a year.

When I go back to my childhood, I remember the fast used to be one day of avoiding cereals altogether. We were allowed to eat chapatis made of Kuttu flour, singharha flour, samak rice and chaulai daal (all fruits).

As children, we could never understand the meaning and/or significance of fasts. Today India is fast becoming a hub of diabetes, heart diseases and insulin resistance. All these disease conditions are linked with not observing fasts or eating high carb diets every day.

The major culprit is eating carbohydrates, especially, refined carbohydrates. Recollecting our mythology when only one king Raja Dashrath died of heart attack, it only signifies that our mythological lifestyle was preventing heart diseases in India. The western culture, which is now spreading fast in India, involves eating carbohydrates, especially, refined carbohydrates (white sugar, white rice, white maida) every day.

I recently conducted a survey and found that women who observe weekly fast or vrat have lower incidence of metabolic syndrome. But, today, girls and women are failing to observe ‘vrat’ or ‘spiritual vrata’.

Therefore, they must be made to understand the same in the language of a ‘medical vrat’. A simpler version of ‘vrat’ can be – not eating carbohydrates at all once in a week and replacing them with fruits and vegetables.

I usually suggest that once in a week, one should eat only fruits and vegetables and at the most can have milk, curd. If still someone has desires, can have besan ka chila.

Treatment of Fatty Liver

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness  | | Comments Off on Treatment of Fatty Liver

 

  • A 10% weight loss can improve fatty liver and possibly inflammation.
  • Metformin and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) are not recommended.
  • Statins are safe in patients with fatty liver but whether they can reduce fatty liver is not known.
  • Omega–3 fatty acids have been tried.
  • Pioglitazone is useful in the treatment of biopsy–proven fatty liver with inflammation
  • Vitamin E at a dose of 800 IU/day improves liver inflammation
  • Use of bariatric surgery for treatment of fatty liver is premature and should be avoided in patients with cirrhosis.

Direct all your energy towards the soul and nor the ego

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Direct all your energy towards the soul and nor the ego

The epic Mahabharata can also be understood as a science of inner Mahabharata happening in everybody’s mind. 

Lord Krishna symbolizes the consciousness and the five Pandavas, the five positive qualities of a person namely, righteousness (Yudhishthir), focused (Arjuna), power to fight injustice (Bheem), helping others (Sahdev) and learning to be neutral in difficult situations (Nakul). Panchali indicates the five senses, which can only be controlled when these five forces are together. 

Dhritrashtra symbolizes ignorance, Duhshasan negative ruling quality (dusht while ruling) and Duryodhana (dusht in yudh) one who is not balanced in war. 

Conscious-based decisions need to be taken to kill the negativity in the mind. Every action, if directed towards the consciousness or the soul, is the right action. To kill all the 100 Kauravas (the 100 negative tendencies a person can have) controlled by Duryodhan and Duhshasan along with Shakuni (the negative power of cunningness), positive qualities have to be redirected towards consciousness and take right decisions. 

The five Pandavas (positive qualities) made soul (Lord Krishna) as their point of reference (Sarthi) and won over the evils (Kauravas). 

Bhishma Pitamah, Karna and Dronacharya, individually all had winning powers; but, they all supported negative thoughts and made Duryodhana as their point of reference and ultimately had to die. 

The message is very clear – if one directs his or her positive powers towards ego as the reference point in long run, they will be of no use and, in fact, will be responsible for one’s destruction. 

Ravana too was a great scholar but he directed all his energies and powers towards his ego and ended up in misery. 

Therefore, one should cultivate a positive mental attitude, positive thoughts instead of directing them towards desire, attachment or ego and should direct them to soul/consciousness for a positive outcome.

Leverage your strengths

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: | | Comments Off on Leverage your strengths

  • Know your strengths
  • According to a British study, only about one–third of people have a useful understanding of their strengths.
  • If something comes easily, you may take it for granted and not identify it as a strength.
  • If you are not sure, ask someone you respect who knows you well, by noticing what people compliment you on, and by thinking about what comes most easily to you.
  • Strengths which most closely linked to happiness are gratitude, hope, vitality, curiosity, and love.
  • Strengths are so important that they’re worth cultivating and applying in your daily life, even if they don’t come naturally to you.

Fits or Epilepsy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Fits or Epilepsy

  • Seizure is a sudden change in behavior that is the consequence of brain dysfunction.
  • Approximately 0.5–1% of population has epilepsy.
  • Some seizures are provoked i.e. that occur in metabolic derangements, drug or alcohol withdrawal and in situations like acute paralysis or acute encephalitis. Such patients are not considered to have epilepsy because these seizures would not recur in the absence of the provocation.
  • Less than 50% of epilepsy cases will have an identifiable cause such as head trauma, brain tumor, paralysis, infection, brain malformation etc.
  • Having one seizure does not always mean that the patient would always get a seizure.
  • One episode of seizure may not require treatment.
  • Hospitalization is required in the first seizure only if it is associated with prolonged post seizure altered level of consciousness.
  • Patients with unprovoked seizure may not be allowed to drive for some time.
  • In children, seizure can occur with high grade fever.
  • In adults, the first episode of seizure may be due to worms in the brain. In such a situation, it may be necessary to do an MRI test.
  • A patient with seizure can get married, live a normal life and produce children.
  • It is a misnomer that during a fit that the person should be made to smell a shoe.
  • During epilepsy, never put the fingers inside the mouth of the patient as they may get injured. Use a spoon instead to prevent tongue bite.
  • A patient with epilepsy fall will have stiffness in the body; on the contrary, patient with cardiac loss of consciousness will fall loose.
  • A seizure that lasts for more than 5–10 minutes requires specialized attention.