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Dr K K Aggarwal

Reduce weight first if facing infertility problem

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Both obese men and women can face fertility problems unless they reduce their weight. Reducing weight as the first step can bring back their fertility.

• Obese men are more than three times as likely to have low sperm counts compared with their normal-weight peers. A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility showed that the heaviest men were at triple the risk of having a low count of progressively motile sperms, those that swim forward in a straight line.

• Increased body fat can also contribute to lower testosterone levels and higher estrogen levels.

• Obese men were also 1.6 times more likely than overweight or normal-weight men to have a high percentage of abnormally shaped sperm.

• There is a trend toward increasing likelihood of erectile dysfunction with increasing BMI.

• Obesity is associated with a greater risk of impotence.

• Obesity is also associated with metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) in women and associated infertility.

How long can one fast?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As per Allopathy, one cannot live without air or oxygen for more than 3 minutes, without water for more than three days and without food for more than 3 weeks. As per Chandogya Upanishad, food is responsible for the making of motor organs (Karmendriyas), sensory organs, manas (mind, intellect, memory and ego) and prana. The fiery foods are responsible for making the motor indriyas, earthy foods the sensory indriyas and manas and water for making Prana Vayu. Therefore, it is possible for a person to live on water for up to few weeks because he will keep making Prana and keep breathing but absence of food on 14th day onwards will start affecting his Gnanaindriyas and Manas. The person will start losing power of hearing, touching and sensing and will start showing impairment in mental status, memory, intellect functions and egoistic behavior

The Seven Dhatus in Ayurveda

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As per Ayurveda physiology, food is Brahman and contains the same consciousness as in us and this consciousness is the essence of any food. Any food digested is converted into three portions, the gross undigested food is converted into waste (feces); the middle one is converted in one of the Dhatus and the subtlest form gets converted into ojas or the immunity. As per standard Ayurveda, food once eaten is converted into the first Dhatu i.e. Rasa. Once the formation of Rasa is complete, the remaining is converted into Rakta (blood).The left over essence of food makes Mamsa (muscles), the leftover of which makes (Medha (adipose tissue) and so on to form Asthi (Bone), Majja (bone marrow) and Shukra (sperm/ova). As per this physiology, the second Dhatu will only form once the first Dhatu is of good quality and so on and at any step if the Dhatu is not formed properly, the subsequent Dhatu will also be defectively formed. For example, defective Dhatu at the stage of Asthi (bone) will have normal plasma (blood), muscle and adipose tissue but may have an impaired immunity/sperm/bone marrow. Similarly, defective Dhatu at the level of bone marrow may have only impaired immunity with no impairment of other Dhatus. On the other hand, impairment of Dhatus at the level of plasma or blood will involve all other Dhatus in sickness. Isolated disorders of Shukra may have no involvement of other Dhatus at all. This Ayurveda principle can help us to answer many yet unanswered questions in modern allopathy. Like – why in typhoid fever all the organs are involved and why in azoospermia no other organ is involved. The Upanishads talk about formation of Dhatus in much more detail. According to them, different types of foods make different types of Dhatus. Fiery foods like oil and ghee are responsible for formation of Karmendriyan (part of shukra), bone and bone marrow (Dhatu). The earthy foods are responsible for formation of Gnanandriyan and Manas (shukra) and muscle (flesh) and water in food is responsible for formation of Rasa and Rakta (plasma and blood) and Pran (Shukra). This means that every different type of food would make different types of Dhatus and a balanced food with a combination of fire, water and earth will only be responsible for formation of shukra, immunity or the essence.

Water Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Safe water is an essential commodity for prevention of most water and food-borne diseases like diarrhea, typhoid and jaundice. These diseases are 100% preventable. All of them can be lethal if not prevented, diagnosed or treated in time. Transmission of parasitic infections can also occur with contaminated water. Here are a few tips:

• Travelers should avoid consuming tap water.

• Avoid ice made from tap water.

• Avoid any food rinsed in tap water.

• Chlorination kills most bacterial and viral pathogens.

• Chlorination does not kill giardia or amoeba cysts.

• Chlorination does not kill Cryptosporidium.

• Boiled/Treated/Bottled water is safe.

• Carbonated drinks, wine and drinks made with boiled water are safe.

• Freezing does not kill organisms that cause diarrhea. Ice in drinks is not safe unless it has been made from adequately boiled or filtered water.

• Alcohol does not sterilize water or the ice. Mixed drinks may still be contaminated.

• Hot tea and coffee are the best alternates to boiled water.

• Bottled drinks should be requested without ice and should be drunk from the bottle with a straw rather than with a glass.

• Boiling water for 3 minutes followed by cooling to room temperature will kill bacterial parasites.

• Adding two drops of 5% sodium hydrochloride (bleach) to quarter of water (1 liter) will kill most bacteria in 30 minutes.

The Seven Dhatus in Ayurveda

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As per Ayurveda physiology, food is Brahman and contains the same consciousness as in us and this consciousness is the essence of any food. Any food digested is converted into three portions, the gross undigested food is converted into waste (feces); the middle one is converted in one of the Dhatus and the subtlest form gets converted into ojas or the immunity. As per standard Ayurveda, food once eaten is converted into the first Dhatu i.e. Rasa. Once the formation of Rasa is complete, the remaining is converted into Rakta (blood).The left over essence of food makes Mamsa (muscles), the leftover of which makes (Medha (adipose tissue) and so on to form Asthi (Bone), Majja (bone marrow) and Shukra (sperm/ova). As per this physiology, the second Dhatu will only form once the first Dhatu is of good quality and so on and at any step if the Dhatu is not formed properly, the subsequent Dhatu will also be defectively formed. For example, defective Dhatu at the stage of Asthi (bone) will have normal plasma (blood), muscle and adipose tissue but may have an impaired immunity/sperm/bone marrow. Similarly, defective Dhatu at the level of bone marrow may have only impaired immunity with no impairment of other Dhatus. On the other hand, impairment of Dhatus at the level of plasma or blood will involve all other Dhatus in sickness. Isolated disorders of Shukra may have no involvement of other Dhatus at all. This Ayurveda principle can help us to answer many yet unanswered questions in modern allopathy. Like – why in typhoid fever all the organs are involved and why in azoospermia no other organ is involved. The Upanishads talk about formation of Dhatus in much more detail. According to them, different types of foods make different types of Dhatus. Fiery foods like oil and ghee are responsible for formation of Karmendriyan (part of shukra), bone and bone marrow (Dhatu). The earthy foods are responsible for formation of Gnanandriyan and Manas (shukra) and muscle (flesh) and water in food is responsible for formation of Rasa and Rakta (plasma and blood) and Pran (Shukra). This means that every different type of food would make different types of Dhatus and a balanced food with a combination of fire, water and earth will only be responsible for formation of shukra, immunity or the essence.

What is the difference between smile, hug and laugh?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Smile is a sign of joy while hug is a sign of love. Laughter on the other hand is a sign of inner happiness.

Neither of them are at the level of mind or intellect. All come from within the heart. They are only the gradations of your expressions of your happiness.

It is said you are incomplete in your dress if you are not wearing a smile on your face.

Hug comes next… and laughter the last. Laughter is like an internal jogging and has benefits similar to meditation.

But be careful we must know when not to laugh. The most difficult is to laugh on oneself.

5 steps to lower Alzheimer’s risk (HealthBeat)

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Maintain a healthy weight.

• Check your waistline.

• Eat mindfully. Emphasize colorful, vitamin-packed vegetables and fruits; whole grains; fish, lean poultry, tofu, and beans and other legumes as protein sources plus healthy fats. Cut down on unnecessary calories from sweets, sodas, refined grains like white bread or white rice, unhealthy fats, fried and fast foods and mindless snacking. Keep a close eye on portion sizes, too.

• Exercise regularly. Aim for 2½ to 5 hours weekly of brisk walking (at 4 mph). Or try a vigorous exercise like jogging (at 6 mph) for half that time.

• Keep an eye on important health numbers. In addition to watching your weight and waistline, keep a watch on your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and blood sugar numbers.

Vitamin A–rich diet – Vitamin A–rich foods include the following:

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Liver

Beef

Chicken

Eggs

Whole milk

Fortified milk

Carrots

Mangoes

Orange fruits

Sweet potatoes

Spinach, kale, and other green vegetables

Eating at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day is recommended in order to provide a comprehensive distribution of carotenoids.

A variety of foods, such as breakfast cereals, pastries, breads, crackers, and cereal grain bars, are often fortified with 10–15% of the RDA of vitamin A.

The Science behind Training and Development

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Training in any field requires gaining knowledge, skills and positive mental attitude towards the object of learning.

The knowledge is everything about what and why. In Yoga, it correlates with the Gyan (Gnana) Marg. The skill is all about how to do it and correlates with Karma Marg.

A positive mental attitude is linked to willingness to do any work or in other words, one’s Astha in that action. In Yoga, it is synonymous with Bhakti Marg.

In Bhagwad Gita, Lord Krishna talks about all the principles of management including how to train and develop an individual.

The development teaches and increases one’s intelligence quotient (IQ), physical quotient (PQ), emotional quotient (EQ) and moral quotient (MQ).

Tips for getting the rest you need

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Reserve your bedroom for sleep and intimacy.

• Banish television, computer, smartphone, tablet, and other diversions from that space.

• Nap only if necessary.

• Avoid caffeine after noon, and go light on alcohol.

• Get regular exercise, but not within 3 hours of bedtime.

• Plan a vacation with a light schedule and few obligations. • Avoid backsliding into a new debt cycle. Try to go to bed and get up at the same time every day — at the very least, on weekdays. If need be, use weekends to make up for lost sleep.

What is charity?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Some time back after returning from a free health check-up camp, I met a processor of Cardiology from Lucknow and started boasting that I had seen 100 patients free of charge today. He said do not get excited. Charity is a positive, but still not the absolute positive, unless it is done without any motive or done secretly. He said that you were honored on the stage, you got blessings from the patients and people talked about you in positive sense. It was an investment in the long run and not an absolute charity. When you serve, never be honored on the stage by the people to whom you are serving. If you do so, then it is like give and take. The purpose of life should be to help others without any expectations.

Understanding helping others

When you help others, it should not harm somebody else even though your help is unconditional. If you promote somebody by superseding another deserving senior person, this is not a help as the person to whom you are helping will give you one blessing but the person to whom you have harmed will give you 10 curses. Ultimately you end up with minus 8 points. Helping other means that it should give happiness to you, to the persons you have helped and also to others to whom you have not helped.

Helping always pays

The difference between American and Indian models is that Indians always think of now and do not invest in future. Americans always plans for the future. When we help somebody, we want that the same person should expect you by helping you when you are in need in a shorter run. But charity does not believe in that. Your job is to help others and negate your negative past karmas. You never know, may be decades later you might receive help from a person who you had helped decades earlier. Help should never be linked to returns.

White rice most dangerous

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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White rice is much more dangerous in terms of glycemic index than white bread. It has glycemic index of 102. We often tell people not to take cola drinks but they eat white bread. The glycemic index for white bread is 100% and that for cola drink is 90%. Traditional Indian drinks like Rooh Afza, Khas Khas may also contain more than 10% sugar.

The recommended sugary drink does not contain more than 2-3% sugar, which is the amount present in oral rehydration solution. People leave a cola drink and take mashed potato, which has glycemic index more than that of a cola drink (102 versus 90).

Pizza has a glycemic index of 86. Table sugar has a glycemic index of 84, while that of jam is 95. French fries have a glycemic index of 95.

Most people add sugar in food and snacks because sugar is a preservative. Less the sugar, earlier the food will be spoiled.

To avoid refined carbohydrates in diet, if one has to choose, then the most dangerous is white rice, followed by white bread and then comes white sugar.

Facts about Soul and the Spirit

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Energy is the raw material of the universe.

• Information is the organization of energy into reproducible patterns.

• Consciousness is living information and energy (living energized information)

• Consciousness is, therefore, intelligence.

• Intelligence is information and energy that has self-referral or the ability to learn through experiences and the ability to reinterpret and influence one’s own information and energy states.

• Consciousness is live, advanced, software-driven energized information.

• Closest example: Advanced computer software which can type, correct, interpret, edit and store spoken or read information.

Types of Memory

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The easiest way to remember types of memory is by understanding the concept of Suno, Samjho, Jano and Karo (hearing, listening, knowledge and wisdom). Hearing is the shortest lasting memory. We hear and we forget is the rule.

Once we listen and understand, the memory is longer lasting but the same memory become everlasting if we not only hear, understand and know but also incorporate that knowledge in practice.

These principles have been used by marketing people in brand recall. By practicing the brand name repeatedly you create a permanent impact of their brand in the soul and it is unlikely that you will forget the brand and its recall value will increase every time you think about the molecule.

The same principle has been used by devotees of Rama and Shiva where they make people to write the name of Rama repeatedly everyday and the devotees of Shiva makes people writing the Om Namaha Shivai in a piece of a paper for years together. By doing so you inculcate the teachings of Lord Rama and Shiva.

Many spiritual Gurus give a Mantra also based on the same principle. A mantra is nothing but a positive affirmation which you have to follow every minute of your life, throughout your life. Once you start doing it, a time will come when it will become a part of your consciousness and you will start living and behaving in a way as of your positive affirmation. For example, Brahma Kumaris say, “Always say a positive affirmation to yourself that I am a peaceful soul. After some time you will start behaving like a peaceful soul and you will lose agitation, anger and negative affirmations of life.”

5 tips to reduce salt in your diet

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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1. Make reading food labels a habit. Sodium content is always listed on food labels. Sodium content can vary from brand to brand, so compare and choose the lowest sodium product. Certain foods don’t taste particularly salty but are actually high in sodium, such as cottage cheese, so it’s critical to check labels.

2. Stick to fresh meats, fruits and vegetables rather than their packaged counterparts, which tend to be higher in sodium.

3. Avoid spices and seasonings that contain added sodium, for example, garlic salt. Choose garlic powder instead.

4. Many restaurants list the sodium content of their products on their websites, so do your homework before dining out. Also, you can request that your food be prepared without any added salt. 5. Try to spread your sodium intake out throughout the day; it’s easier on your kidneys than eating lots of salt all at once.