Sub Logo

Dr K K Aggarwal

Some facts on healthy eating

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Some facts on healthy eating

• Natural fast food is good for health.

• Examples of natural fast foods are milk, dry fruits and fruits.

• Artificial fast food or junk food is bad for health.

• Junk food contains refined sugar, bad fats and trans fats.

• Trans fats reduce the amount of good cholesterol and raised the levels of bad cholesterol in the body.

• Soft drinks, if taken more than one in a day, are harmful to the health.

• Sweets contain more than 30% sugar and are harmful to the body.

• White sugar, white maida and white rice should be avoided.

• Jaggery is better than sugar. • All girls should eat jaggery and white gram once a week.

Why do we ring the bell in a temple?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Why do we ring the bell in a temple?

The vibrations of the ringing bell also produce the auspicious primordial sound ‘Om’, thus creating a connection between the deity and the mind. As we start the daily ritualistic worship (pooja), we ring the bell, chanting:

Aagamaarthamtu devaanaam

gamanaarthamtu rakshasaam

Kurve ghantaaravam tatra

devataahvaahna lakshanam

“I ring this bell indicating the invocation of divinity, So that virtuous and noble forces enter (my home and heart); And the demonic and evil forces From within and without, depart.”

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

Why do We Burn Camphor in Any Pooja?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Why do We Burn Camphor in Any Pooja?

No Aarti is performed without camphor. Camphor, when lit, burns itself out completely without leaving a trace of it. Camphor represents our inherent tendencies or vasanas. When lit by the fire of knowledge about the self, the vasanas burn themselves out completely, not leaving a trace of ego. Ego is responsible for a sense of individuality that keeps us separate from the Lord or consciousness. Camphor when burns, emits a pleasant perfume. This signifies that as we burn our ego we can only spread love and nothing else. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

Clinicians should aggressively treat unhealthy lifestyles

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Clinicians should aggressively treat unhealthy lifestyles

Unhealthy behaviors should be managed as aggressively as hypertension, high cholesterol, and other heart disease risk factors, according to an American Heart Association policy statement published in the journal Circulation. Doctors should create “interprofessional practices” to connect patients with behavior-change specialists. They must implement five A’s when caring for patients 1. Assess a patient’s risk behaviors for heart disease 2. Advise change, such as weight loss or exercise 3. Agree on an action plan 4. Assist with treatment 5. Arrange for follow–up care.

Importance of Vitamin D in mythology – Dr KK Aggarwal

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Importance of Vitamin D in mythology – Dr KK Aggarwal

Today it is a known fact that 80% of the Indian society is vitamin D deficient. It was probably known to our Rishi Munis and they created rituals so that everybody gets enough Vitamin D from sunlight. Shahi snan in sunlight is mentioned in our Vedic literature. • The month of Magha, Vaishakha and Kartik are considered as months for Shahi Snans where one is supposed to worship the sun early in the morning and eat calcium rich food such as Urad Ki Daal or sesame seeds. • Chhat pooja, which falls immediately after Diwali is also linked to sun worship. • Sun is also worshipped in Marghshirsha month, which comes immediately after the month of Kartik. • Kartik purnima and Vaishakh purnima are especially known for sun worship. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with metabolic syndrome, heart diseases and also with fertility. All these months when sun is worshipped are also the months of increased fertility. After chaturmas is over, Tulsi vivah starts the marriage season during which one worships both Tulsi and Amla. Both of them are known to increase the quantity of semen and increased ovulation. Probably, the age old treatment of infertility was to acquire vitamin D, taking calcium rich food and consume both tulsi and amla on regular basis. The current vitamin D mantra is that 40 days in a year for at least 40 minutes, one should expose 40% of the body to the sunlight either after sunrise or just before sunset. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

Patients with acidity should avoid chocolates and peppermint

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Patients with acidity should avoid chocolates and peppermint

Persistent acidity is usually due to reflux of acid from the stomach into the food pipe. Mild cases of acidity reflux can usually be managed with lifestyle and dietary modifications along with antacids, H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors. However, patients in whom lifestyle management along with empirical treatment is unsuccessful or who have symptoms suggestive of complicated diseases should undergo endoscopy to rule out cancer of the food pipe, a condition linked with persistent acidity. Symptoms that may suggest complicated disease include loss of appetite, loss of weight and difficulty in swallowing food, bleeding and signs of systemic illness. Lifestyle changes for reflux involve elevation of head and of the body, avoidance of food before sleep and avoidance of food which makes the food pipe valve lax. The examples of such foods include fatty food, chocolates, peppermint and excessive intake of alcohol. Hurry, worry and curry are the three main factors that cause acidity apart from alcohol and smoking. People with acidity should consume less of fermented, sour, salty and pungent foods.

What is the importance of life force?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on What is the importance of life force?

A physical body becomes useless once the life force is gone. The same body, which was lovable to everyone, becomes a liability after death. Everyone wants to dispose it as early as possible as keeping a dead body at home is considered a bad omen. During the transfer of dead body from one place to another nobody wants to keep the body in a vehicle other than a hearse van, meant to transport dead bodies. No family would be willing to carry the dead body of a person in a car in which the deceased person had been traveling or driving for years. Once you touch a dead body you are required to take a bath, for any reason, health or ritual, before you commence your daily routine. Within a matter of hours in absence of life force, the physical body starts disintegrating and in a matter of days, it shows signs of self-destruction and putrefaction. This vital force is nothing but the soul, atma, brahma, spirit or consciousness described in different Vedic texts. Adi Shankaracharya in his book Bhaja Govindam shloka 6 says: Yávat-pavano nivasati dehe Távat-pøcchati kuùalam gehe, Gatavati váyau dehápáye Bháryá bibhyati tasmin káye.(6) “Till the life force remains in the body, people come and enquire about your welfare. But, the moment the life force goes out, even your wife is afraid of coming anywhere near your body”. Life force can be equated to the network of information in computer, radio, television or mobile phone. All these gadgets without data are useless and are thrown away. This silent data retrievable by operational and application software represent the life force or soul of these electronic gadgets. Just as one does not give importance to a computer without data, one should not give importance to the physical body. It is the life force within the body which is respected and cared for and that is what real “I” or “We” are. All glories of the body are only until the life force remains in it. In Bhagavad-Gita, Lord Krishna in Chapter 2 (2.23) says about this life force or ataman “fire cannot burn it, weapon cannot cut it, water cannot wet it, air cannot dry it, it is immortal”. The most defined relationship in Vedic text is between husband and wife. The very fact even a wife after death does not want to touch the husband signifies the importance of life force. The life force has no dimensions: height, weight, color or image. It is immortal, omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent. The weight of a live and a dead body immediately after the death is the same. It is the same life force, which dwells in everybody and during life is modified by the action, memory and desire cycle. If one gets attached to any of the three, then one starts getting detached from the soul or the life force. People who are in touch with their life force all the time attain peace and happiness and die young in old age. Most Vedic mahavakyas talk about, that it is the same spirit, which dwells in everybody and hence every person in the society should be welcomed and treated with equal importance. Aham brahmasami, tatwam asi, vasudeva kutumbakam, etc. are a few of the examples. According to Adi Shankaracharya, one can achieve non-duality only by seeing God in everyone. Athithi-devo-bhava is also based on the same principle. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

Eating foods in their natural form is always better

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Eating foods in their natural form is always better

An elephant is obese, eats sugarcane (ganna) and yet does not develop diabetes. I am sure if he is given 10% sugar drinks everyday or made to eat 30% sugar containing sweets, he too would end up with diabetes. The natural form of sugarcane is eating ganna, the second form is sugarcane juice, third is gur (jaggery), fourth is shakkar and fifth is white sugar. The more you eat foods in their natural form, more the health benefits you will get from that food. Food is Brahmin and contains the same consciousness as you have. Food, which is more refined will loses its consciousness and is not beneficial to the health. Similarly, wheat flour with bran is better than flour without bran, which is better than suji, which is better than maida. Maida is the final product and if taken every day, it can cause heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.

Ganesha, the Stress Management Guru – Dr KK Aggarwal

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Ganesha, the Stress Management Guru – Dr KK Aggarwal

If Lord Krishna was the first counselor who taught the principles of counseling, Lord Ganesha taught us the principles of stress management. We should worship Lord Ganesha and become like him whenever we face any difficulty or are stressed out. The elephant head of Lord Ganesha symbolizes that when in difficulty, use your wisdom, intelligence and think differently. It can be equated to the Third Eye of Lord Shiva. Elephant is supposed to be the most intelligent animal in the kingdom. Here, wisdom means to think before speaking. Lord Buddha also said that don’t speak unless it is necessary and is truthful and kind. The big elephant ears of Lord Ganesha signify listening to everybody when in difficulty. Elephant ears are known to hear long distances. Elephant eye see a long distance and in terms of mythology, it represents acquiring the quality of foreseeing when in difficulty. The mouth of Lord Ganesha represents speaking less and hearing and listening more. The big tummy of Lord Ganesha represents digesting any information gathered by listening to people in difficulty. The trunk denotes using the power of discrimination to decide from the retained information. It also indicates doing both smaller and bigger things by yourself. The elephant trunk can pick up a needle as well as a tree. The teeth, broken and unbroken, signify to be in a state of balance in loss and gain. This implies that one should not get upset if the task is not accomplished and also not get excited if the task is accomplished. In times of difficulty, Ganesha also teaches us not to lose strength and control one’s attachments, desires and greed. The four arms of Lord Ganesha represent strength. Ropes in two hands indicate attachment; Laddoo or Sweet in one hand represent desires and mouse represents greed. Riding over the mouse indicates controlling one’s greed. Lord Ganesha is worshipped either when a new work is initiated or when one finds it difficult to complete a job or work. In these two situations, these principles of Lord Ganesha need to be inculcated in one’s habits. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own

FODMAPS free diet

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on FODMAPS free diet

Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease may be at least in part related to impaired absorption of carbohydrates. Fermentable oligo–, di– and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) in patients with IBS or IBD may enter the distal small bowel and colon where they are fermented, leading to symptoms and increased intestinal permeability (and possibly inflammation). Examples of FODMAPs include: • Fructans or inulins (wheat, onions, garlic, and artichokes) • Galactans (beans, lentils, legumes, cabbage, and Brussels’ sprouts) • Lactose (dairy) • Fructose (fruits, honey, high fructose corn syrup) • Sorbitol • Xylitol • Mannitol • Polyols (sweeteners containing sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, maltitol, stone fruits such as avocado, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, plums) Avoidance of carbohydrates has been a long–popularized non–pharmacologic approach to reducing symptoms in IBS (and possibly modifying disease in IBD).

Thinking Differently

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Thinking Differently

There are three ways to manage stress. One is to think opposite, second is to think different and the third is to think positive. Thinking opposite was advocated by Patanjali, thinking differently by Adi Shankaracharya and thinking positive by Gautam Buddha. Out of three approaches, the Indian Vedic philosophy focuses on thinking differently. Thinking positive and thinking opposite may not be feasible at the time of any adversity. Thinking differently has been emphasized in mythology at multiple places. Ten heads of Ravana, five heads of Brahma, elephant head of Lord Ganesha, Fish incarnation of Lord Vishnu and third eye of Lord Shiva remind us of the principle of thinking differently. We can see or analyze a person or a situation with the eyes of our physical body (physical eye) or eyes of the mind (thinking and analyzing) and eyes of the soul (conscious based decision). Lord Buddha once said that a good action should be based on truth, should be necessary and bring happiness both for the person doing it and the society. The 3H principle advocated in the West is also based on the same which means before any action think from your Head and from multiple options available, choose from the Heart and then order the Hands to do the job. The first incarnation of Lord Vishnu Fish indicates the capacity of swimming against the stream. The third eye of Lord Shiva means thinking from the mind and choosing the right answer from the heart. The ten heads of Ravana and five heads of Brahma also indicate thinking to get multiple options. The example of thinking differently comes from the dialogue between Urvashi and Arjuna. Once Urvashi in a mind full of Kama went to Arjuna and said “If you are not going give me a son like you today, I am going to give you a curse”. Arjuna was in a dilemma but he thought differently and said – “Why do you want to wait for 25 years to get a son like me from today I am your son, Mother.” Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own

Eating Out Tips

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Eating Out Tips

• Curb portions: Always order for one if you are two people and if you are alone set aside some of what is on your plate to bring home. • Resist refined carbohydrates. • Load your plate with colorful choices at the salad bar with vegetables, fruits, and small amounts of lean protein. Skip the creamy dressings. • Choose dishes that are grilled, roasted, steamed, or sautéed. • Don’t be afraid to request a salad, vegetables, or fruit instead of starchy side dishes. • If you are a non–vegetarian, order only fish or seafood. • If you decide to have dessert, share it with your dining companion(s).

Science behind regrets (Dr KK Aggarwal)

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Science behind regrets (Dr KK Aggarwal)

In a US–based study, dying people were asked about their regrets, if any. The top five regrets were: 1. I wish I had the courage to live a life I wanted to live and not what others expected me to live. 2. I wish I had worked harder. 3. I wish I had the courage to express my feelings. 4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. 5. I wish I had let myself be happier. Regrets are always based on suppression of emotions or non–fulfillment of desires and needs. These need-based desires can be at the level of physical body, mind, intellect, ego or the soul. Therefore, regrets can be at any of these levels. I did a survey of 15 of my patients and asked them a simple question that if they come to know that they are going to die in next 24 hours, what would be their biggest regret. Only one of them, a doctor said that she would have no regrets. Only one person expressed a physical regret and that was from a Yoga expert who said that her regret was not getting married till that day. Mental regrets were two. 1. A state trading businessman said, “I wish I could have taken care of my parents.” 2. A homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have given more time to my family.” Intellectual regrets were three. 1. A lawyer said, “I wish I could have become something in life.” 2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have helped more people.” 3. A retired revenue inspector said, “I wish I had married off my younger child.” Egoistic regrets were two. 1. One fashion designer said, “I wish I could have become a singer.” 2. A housewife said, “I wish I could have become a dietician.” Spiritual regrets were six. 1. A Consultant Government Liaison officer said, “I wish I could have made my family members happy.” 2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have meditated more.” 3. A Homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my family.” 4. A reception executive said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my parents.” 5. An entertainment CEO said, “I wish I could have taken my parents for a pilgrimage.” 6. A fashion designer said, “I wish I could have worked more for the animals.” In a very popular and successful movie, Kal Ho Na Ho, the hero was to die in the next 40 days. When asked to remember the days of his life, he could not remember 20 ecstatic instances in life. This is what happens with each one of us where we waste all our days and cannot remember more than 50 or even 20 of such instances. If we are given 40 days to live and if we live every day ecstatically, we can get inner happiness. Therefore, we should learn to live in the present instead of having a habit of postponing everything we do. We should learn to prioritize our work and do difficult work first or else we would be in a state of constant worry till that work is over. I teach my patients that they should practice confession exercise and one confession is to talk about your regrets and take them as challenge and finish before the next Tuesday. When working, there are three things which are to be remembered – passion, profession and fashion. Profession is at the level of mind, ego and spirit. We should convert our profession in such a manner that it is fashionable and passionate. Passion means working from the heart and profession means working from mind and intellect and fashion means working the same at the level of ego which is based on show–off. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own

Sangat and smoking

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Sangat and smoking

Sewa, Simran and Sangat are the three principles of life as per the most Vedic literature. Even Adi Shankaracharya described Sangat as the main force for living a spiritual life. Sangat is the company of people you live with. Living in the company of good people makes one good and the reverse is also true. The same is now being proved in the allopathic context. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine has shown that when one person quits smoking, than others are likely to follow. One person quitting can cause a ripple effect, making others more likely to kick the habit. 1. If your spouse stops smoking, you are 67% less likely to continue smoking. 2. If your friend kicks the habit, it’s about 36% less likely that you’ll be smoking. 3. When a sibling gives up cigarettes, your risk of smoking decreases by 25%. 4. Your risk of smoking drops by 34% if a coworker in a small office quits smoking. It is sort of like watching dominoes. If one falls, it very quickly causes others to fall. We should treat people in groups, rather than as individuals. Friends and family need to be involved. If you want to quit, try to get close friends and family to quit as well. Quitting smoking may have the side benefit of improving social well–being, just as it improves physical health.

Science behind Ganesha worship

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Science behind Ganesha worship

While mythological studies knit stories of the Almighty’s existence, the fact remains that human being is bestowed with the untainted potential of recognizing heavenly facets in his own self. Ganesha, the son of Shiva and Parvati is likewise the name given to the harmonious Aacharan or characteristic disposition of man. Remembered and ritually worshiped before starting a new venture, the entity of Ganesha has in store the facets of a complete man. The magnanimous head of the Ganesha, which is that of an elephant, represents wisdom, intelligence and a healthy mind capable of making sound decisions. Not in vain is it said that ‘think before you speak’, which implies Ganesha’s huge head, that is identified with the need for a thoughtful and retrospective attitude. The big ears of this elephant-deity instills among the earthly man the patient channel of lending ears to the echo produced by others’ deeds and speech. It is said that half the dispute is resolved when an ear is lend most patiently. Ganesha or the Ganapati’s extremely small mouth characteristically represents the need for a limited dialogue and the vanity of chattering. Over-expression through words triggers unsought problems many a times which otherwise could be avoided by a tight-lip. Ganesha also represents the guru of stress affected individuals. Shiva’s most promising son, Ganesha, by virtue of his small eyes, highlights the need of a focused outlook in life. Such an outlook not only redefines and foresees the right goals, but also relieves one from the stress-manifested episodes from the various chapters of life. The long trunk identifies with the power of discrimination. The sensitivity of the Ganesha long nose has the strength to uproot a tree and the competency of picking up a pin from the ground. Such should be the approach of an individual who should be capable enough to perceive the good and the bad for himself besides the undaunted strength of overcoming all odds. The tusks and the small teeth of Ganesha should however, be recollected with the loss and gains in the life of a man. Man similarly ought to engrave his mental stature in such a manner that the ups and downs may not deter him from his honest endeavor and the balance of inevitable bliss and sorrow is maintained to add spice in the earthly existences. This stable healthy mental stature is only possible if the physical, social, spiritual and environmental requirements of the body are fulfilled. For the needful, individuals need to be bestowed upon a complete mental and physical health. Further the big tummy of Ganapati Deva preaches the need for retaining information. Acquiring knowledge, utilizing it and retaining it for years to come, becomes the crux of ‘big-belly commandment’. The Char-Bhuja Dhari Ganesha, further represents strength by virtue of the four hands in which the Lord entraps his attachments, desires and greed. Two of the arms of Ganesha, which hold rope, symbolize control over the attachments. The laddoo or sweet in the other two shows command over the desires and earthly delusion. The mouse sitting near the feet of Ganesha represents greed and gluttony upon which the Almighty rides, propagating a control over the evils. Ganesha’s physical traits are an assembly of the characteristics most required in an individual of substance. Disposition incarnated with the goodness of such features will result in success in life and will positively procure an ailment-free survival. Specifically for executives, Ganesha’s characteristic principles may be incorporated in a time-table format which will help in the dawn of a conformable work-atmosphere along with congenial relationship between the management and the union of workers. Deciding the first day of the week to hear all grievance and woes of the workers, the second for thinking and planning strategies to work upon and finally setting targets to be achieved may utilize three days of the week very constructively. Further a day devoted to evaluating losses and gains (Ganesha’s teeth principle) may help additionally in business management. Retaining the information and filing all the pending work can affirmatively call upon the fifth day of the week, which works entirely on the principle of Ganesha’s tummy, which is massive by the virtue of holding tremendous loads of information. Contemplation, discrimination and judging the good and the bad for the entire unit may take another day, leaving the Sunday for self-retrospection through meditation and yoga. One should strive and adopt Ganpati Bappa Maurya’s principles of life management rather than worshiping him with vanity. Life has much in store besides bothering about unnecessary qualms. Giving into a disciplined attitude may assuredly dawn upon a peaceful life. Heaven is where you are, it’s only a matter of perception which makes life as difficult as hell. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.