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Dr K K Aggarwal

Kidney patients more at risk for future heart attacks

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Chronic kidney disease patients with kidney function less than 60% are included in the list of criteria for defining people at highest risk for future heart attacks. In a large cohort Canadian study published in The Lancet led by Dr Marcello Tonelli at University of Alberta, patients with only chronic kidney disease had a significantly higher rate of heart attacks than those who only had diabetes. Those who had already had a heart attack had the highest overall rate of heart attacks.Chronic kidney disease should be regarded as a coronary heart disease risk equivalent, similar to diabetes, as patients with the condition have high rates of cardiovascular events, particularly when they also have proteinuria. When chronic kidney disease was defined more stringently with kidney function less than 45% and increased proteinuria, the rate of first heart attack was higher in those with both chronic kidney disease and diabetes than in those with either disorder alone.

What do you mean by ‘food is Brahman’?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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‘Food is Brahman’ is a saying from the Vedic Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita.

Brahma is consciousness, therefore, food is consciousness. Though the traditional Vedic teaching has been that consciousness is present in everything and yet only food is considered Brahman. We never say that stone is Brahman or dog is Brahman.

As per Chandogya Upanishad (6.15.1) at the time of death, our Vak Vritti (motor senses) merges into Karma Indriyas or mano vritti (sensory senses, mind, intellect, ego and memory) and that now merges with Prana (Udana Vayu) and finally this merges into Tejas, which leaves the body to merge into the Sat.

Vak Vritti, Mano Vritti and Prana Vritti, in the form of vibrations in the atmosphere come back through rain and is taken up by the plants to become plant consciousness.

Therefore, as per Chandogya Upanishad, the consciousness of the Brahman moves from human to plants and plants to human.

The plant food once eaten and absorbed enters into the human body and ultimately makes Prana, Tejas, Ojas, Sperms and Ova. Through sperm and ova, it enters into the next life.

If this theory is correct, then food makes the consciousness and consciousness makes food.

This also further proves that vegetarian food, as it is full of Brahman creates a satvik mind and takes one towards spirituality.

The Tamsik food, which is dead and devoid of consciousness does not lead to a healthy mind as it may produce Mal (waste) or make flesh but will not make essence.

As per Chandogya Upanishad, fiery food makes Karma Indriyas, earthy food makes Gnana Indriyas and Water in food makes Prana.

It further emphasizes on the fact that one should eat freshly cut fruits and vegetables as far as possible as life or consciousness in them can only stay for some time (as per Jainism up to 48 minutes).

Younger women with acute coronary syndromes may not have classic chest pain

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Younger women with an acute coronary syndrome are slightly less likely than men to present with the classic symptom of chest pain, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine. As a result, they often fail to receive a correct diagnosis in the emergency department.

Nadia Khan and colleagues prospectively analyzed data from more than 1,000 ACS patients 55 years of age or younger– 30% of whom were women– participating in the GENESIS PRAXY study.

In these younger patients women were less likely to have chest pain than men (19% of women versus 13.7% for men, p = 0.03).

Women were also more likely than men to have a non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (37.5% vs 30.7%; p = 0.03).

Upon multivariate analysis, women and patients with tachycardia were less likely to have chest pain. The absence of chest pain did not herald any change in the type or severity of the ACS.

Diagnosis of any disease with a lower prevalence but higher mortality, such as coronary artery disease in younger women, is more challenging.

Public health messages should “target both men and women regarding ACS symptom presentation with or without chest pain so as to encourage earlier and more widespread access to appropriate and lifesaving care.

Spiritual Prescription: Who am I? Know Your Soul Profile

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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“I am not my physical body, as I know, once my body dies, nobody wants to touch it.” (Adi Shankaracharya in the Bhaja Govindam)

“I am not my mind as I know whenever I am in trouble; the mind asks the heart for help” (Deepak Chopra in the Seven Spiritual Laws of Success).

“I am my consciousness which is residing in the core of my heart” (Svetasvatara Upanishad 5.8).

“This consciousness is nothing but a web of energized information situated in the void” (Chandogya Upanishad Chapter XII — the Birth of the Gross from the Subtle)

“the consciousness is timeless, has no beginning, no end, weapons cannot cut it, air cannot dry it, water cannot wet it and fire cannot burn it” (Bhagavad Gita 2.23, 24).

Each one of us has a physical profile (as defined by our height, complexion, collar number, waist size, etc.) and has a mental or ego profile. A few examples of ego profile: my bank balance, car, job designation, locality of residence, size of house, contacts, power, clothes’, etc.

Similarly, each one of us also has a soul profile. We should give sometime to ourselves for knowing our soul profile and revisit it at least once in a week.

According to Deepak Chopra, to know the soul profile, an individual should ask 7 questions to his/her consciousness while sitting in a meditative poise or in state of relaxation. The answer to each question should be either in three words or three phrases.

  1. What is my purpose of life?
  2. What is my contribution going to be for my friends and family?
  3. Three instances in my life when I had my peak experiences.
  4. Names of three people who inspire me the most.
  5. Three qualities which I admire in others the most.
  6. Three of my unique talents.
  7. Three qualities I best express in my relationship.

These 21 answers will characterize your soul profile or will be your passport for every action you perform in your life.

In day-to-day’s life, one should act from the soul profile and not from the ego profile. Soul profile cannot be manipulated while the ego profile can be.

There are only three ways of improving one’s soul profile and these are:

  1. The choices one makes should be soul-profile oriented and not ego-profile oriented. Whenever there is an opportunity for an action, ask the head for choices, then ask the heart to choose one, and finally order the hand to take action. A soul-based action is the one which is based on the truth, is necessary, and which makes the person and the people around him or her, both happy.
  2. Total clarity of vision of “What do I want” and also “What I don’t want”.
  3. Learn to enter into discontinuity of thought processes using “beej mantra” or doing primordial sound meditation 20 minutes in the morning and 20 minutes in the evening.

These can also be equated to the eight limbs of Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, where the “choices I make” represents Yama and Niyama, “what do I want” represents Dharma and the “entering into discontinuity” represents Dhyana and Samadhi.

Normal Aging Changes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Heart rate shows less variability.
  • There is altered circadian pattern (24–hour cycle of the body).
  • There is a delayed response of bone marrow to loss of blood or hypoxia (reduced oxygen).
  • The function of the white blood cells is impaired.
  • Advancing age is a procoagulant stage. This means that the blood gets clotted easily.
  • Reflux of the stomach acid in the food pipe is common.
  • Tendency to constipation is common.
  • Painkillers can quite easily cause ulcers in the stomach.
  • Renal functions decline with age.
  • Older kidney is more prone to be damaged with painkillers.
  • Calcification of heart valves may occur.
  • The maximum heart rate may not reach the level as that in the young age in response to exercise.
  • About one–third of the lung volume may be lost.
  • Aging slows the rate of fracture repair.
  • Skin may become atrophic (thin) and elasticity is reduced.
  • A person may not be able to read small print.
  • There may be impaired speech recognition in noisy environment.
  • There may be loss of taste and smell.
  • There may be high frequency hearing loss.
  • Immunity may be reduced.
  • With age, one is more prone to get urinary tract infection.
  • With age, ejaculation may get impaired.

Spiritual Prescription: Who am I? Know Your Soul Profile

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Spiritual Prescription: Who am I? Know Your Soul Profile

“I am not my physical body, as I know, once my body dies, nobody wants to touch it.” (Adi Shankaracharya in the Bhaja Govindam)

“I am not my mind as I know whenever I am in trouble; the mind asks the heart for help” (Deepak Chopra in the Seven Spiritual Laws of Success).

“I am my consciousness which is residing in the core of my heart” (Svetasvatara Upanishad 5.8).

“This consciousness is nothing but a web of energized information situated in the void” (Chandogya Upanishad Chapter XII — the Birth of the Gross from the Subtle)

“the consciousness is timeless, has no beginning, no end, weapons cannot cut it, air cannot dry it, water cannot wet it and fire cannot burn it” (Bhagavad Gita 2.23, 24).

Each one of us has a physical profile (as defined by our height, complexion, collar number, waist size, etc.) and has a mental or ego profile. A few examples of ego profile: my bank balance, car, job designation, locality of residence, size of house, contacts, power, clothes’, etc.

Similarly, each one of us also has a soul profile. We should give sometime to ourselves for knowing our soul profile and revisit it at least once in a week.

According to Deepak Chopra, to know the soul profile, an individual should ask 7 questions to his/her consciousness while sitting in a meditative poise or in state of relaxation. The answer to each question should be either in three words or three phrases.

  1. What is my purpose of life?
  2. What is my contribution going to be for my friends and family?
  3. Three instances in my life when I had my peak experiences.
  4. Names of three people who inspire me the most.
  5. Three qualities which I admire in others the most.
  6. Three of my unique talents.
  7. Three qualities I best express in my relationship.

These 21 answers will characterize your soul profile or will be your passport for every action you perform in your life.

In day-to-day’s life, one should act from the soul profile and not from the ego profile. Soul profile cannot be manipulated while the ego profile can be.

There are only three ways of improving one’s soul profile and these are:

  1. The choices one makes should be soul-profile oriented and not ego-profile oriented. Whenever there is an opportunity for an action, ask the head for choices, then ask the heart to choose one, and finally order the hand to take action. A soul-based action is the one which is based on the truth, is necessary, and which makes the person and the people around him or her, both happy.
  2. Total clarity of vision of “What do I want” and also “What I don’t want”.
  3. Learn to enter into discontinuity of thought processes using “beej mantra” or doing primordial sound meditation 20 minutes in the morning and 20 minutes in the evening.

These can also be equated to the eight limbs of Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, where the “choices I make” represents Yama and Niyama, “what do I want” represents Dharma and the “entering into discontinuity” represents Dhyana and Samadhi.

Tips for preventing back and spine problems.

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Get moving. Physical activity helps in keeping the joints fluid. A person who is not physically active is more susceptible to back problems.
  • Eat healthy. If you maintain good eating habits, you not only will maintain a healthy weight, but you also will not put unnecessary stress on your body.
  • Sleep sideways. The best position for sleeping is on your side. If you are sleeping on your stomach, put a pillow under your lower abdomen to help take stress off your back.
  • Correct your posture and avoid stress. The importance of good posture cannot be overlooked in preventing back problems. Additionally, stress can tense your muscles, and constant tension of this kind can cause back pain. Thus, it is important to find ways to reduce stress.

An empty mind is the devil’s house

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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“Khali dimag shaitan ka ghar” is an old saying.

Empty mind means when you are doing nothing and Shaitan means negative thoughts. In terms of Vedic science, negative thoughts mean absence of positive thoughts and they are often equated to darkness, which is absence of light.

Positive thoughts always need efforts and exertions, while negative thoughts are spontaneous and without exertion. It is recommended that one should think differently and positive otherwise there will be spontaneous appearance of negative thoughts.

Darkness is spontaneous and naturally present and to bring light one has to make efforts by switching on the light or the nature has to ask the Sun to come and give the light.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Tips for preventing back and spine problems

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Tips for preventing back and spine problems

  • Get moving. Physical activity helps in keeping the joints fluid. A person who is not physically active is more susceptible to back problems.
  • Eat healthy. If you maintain good eating habits, you not only will maintain a healthy weight, but you also will not put unnecessary stress on your body.
  • Sleep sideways. The best position for sleeping is on your side. If you are sleeping on your stomach, put a pillow under your lower abdomen to help take stress off your back.
  • Correct your posture and avoid stress. The importance of good posture cannot be overlooked in preventing back problems. Additionally, stress can tense your muscles, and constant tension of this kind can cause back pain. Thus, it is important to find ways to reduce stress.

An empty mind is the devil’s house

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on An empty mind is the devil’s house

“Khali dimag shaitan ka ghar” is an old saying.

Empty mind means when you are doing nothing and Shaitan means negative thoughts. In terms of Vedic science, negative thoughts mean absence of positive thoughts and they are often equated to darkness, which is absence of light.

Positive thoughts always need efforts and exertions, while negative thoughts are spontaneous and without exertion. It is recommended that one should think differently and positive otherwise there will be spontaneous appearance of negative thoughts.

Darkness is spontaneous and naturally present and to bring light one has to make efforts by switching on the light or the nature has to ask the Sun to come and give the light.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Common Cold

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Common cold is a benign self–limiting syndrome caused by several viruses.
  2. It is one of the most frequent acute illnesses.
  3. The term ‘common cold’ refers to a mild upper respiratory viral illness presenting with sneezing, nasal congestion, nasal discharge, low grade fever, headache and malaise.
  4. Common cold is not the same as influenza or common sore throat, which can also involve the heart.
  5. Common cold affects a pre–school child 5–7 times in a year and adult 2–3 times in a year.
  6. It can spread by direct contact with the infected person or by indirect contact with a contaminated environmental surface.
  7. It can also spread by small particle droplets that become airborne from sneezing or coughing.
  8. It can also be transmitted via large particle droplets that typically require close contact with infected person.
  9. Most important is hand to hand transmission of the virus.
  10. Infection can also spread through circulating air in commercial airline passenger cabins.
  11. Saliva does not spread any cold.
  12. The disease is most infectious on the 2nd and 3rd day of illness.
  13. However, a person may be infectious for up to two weeks.
  14. Normal cold may last for 8–10 days.
  15. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings.
  16. Common cold can exacerbate asthma in susceptible individuals.

What do you mean by ‘food is Brahman’?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on What do you mean by ‘food is Brahman’?

 

‘Food is Brahman’ is a saying from the Vedic Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita.

Brahma is consciousness, therefore, food is consciousness. Though the traditional Vedic teaching has been that consciousness is present in everything and yet only food is considered Brahman. We never say that stone is Brahman or dog is Brahman.

As per Chandogya Upanishad (6.15.1) at the time of death, our Vak Vritti (motor senses) merges into Karma Indriyas or mano vritti (sensory senses, mind, intellect, ego and memory) and that now merges with Prana (Udana Vayu) and finally this merges into Tejas, which leaves the body to merge into the Sat.

Vak Vritti, Mano Vritti and Prana Vritti, in the form of vibrations in the atmosphere come back through rain and is taken up by the plants to become plant consciousness.

Therefore, as per Chandogya Upanishad, the consciousness of the Brahman moves from human to plants and plants to human.

The plant food once eaten and absorbed enters into the human body and ultimately makes Prana, Tejas, Ojas, Sperms and Ova. Through sperm and ova, it enters into the next life.

If this theory is correct, then food makes the consciousness and consciousness makes food.

This also further proves that vegetarian food, as it is full of Brahman creates a satvik mind and takes one towards spirituality.

The Tamsik food, which is dead and devoid of consciousness does not lead to a healthy mind as it may produce Mal (waste) or make flesh but will not make essence.

As per Chandogya Upanishad, fiery food makes Karma Indriyas, earthy food makes Gnana Indriyas and Water in food makes Prana.

It further emphasizes on the fact that one should eat freshly cut fruits and vegetables as far as possible as life or consciousness in them can only stay for some time (as per Jainism up to 48 minutes).

 

Tips to avoid winter allergies

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Make sure that the Christmas trees and decorations are mold free.
  • Turn on exhaust fan when showering to remove excess odor from the house.
  • For the same reason‚ turn on the exhaust fan while cooking.
  • Clean your carpets with HEPA vacuum to reduce the burden of dust mite and pet allergens.
  • Moping of floors should be done.
  • Wash your hands after playing with pets.
  • Wash your bed linen and pajamas in hot water (above 130 degree) to kill dust mites.
  • Keep indoor humidity level between 30-40%Look for visible mold in the house especially in the basement.
  • Keep your bedroom allergy-free.

Why do we regard trees and plants as being sacred?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The upper part of the plants, the leaves, flowers and fruits are worshipped as sacred and offered to God. As per the Bhagwad Gita, these have satvik properties. Roots of any plant are tamsik and not offered in pooja or eaten during pooja days. The same is true for the stems of plants, which have rajsik properties.

Fresh and live fruits have the same spirit and life force as in the human beings and are considered sacred the same way as any human being. Human life also depends on plants and trees. They give us the vital factors that make life possible on earth: food, oxygen, clothing, shelter, medicines etc.

Ancient scriptures suggest the planting of a minimum of ten trees. We are also urged to apologize to a plant or tree before cutting it to avoid incurring a specific sin named soona.

Many trees and plants like tulsi‚ peepal etc.‚ which also have medicinal value‚ are worshipped.

Tips to avoid winter allergies

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Tips to avoid winter allergies

  • Make sure that the Christmas trees and decorations are mold free.
  • Turn on exhaust fan when showering to remove excess odor from the house.
  • For the same reason‚ turn on the exhaust fan while cooking.
  • Clean your carpets with HEPA vacuum to reduce the burden of dust mite and pet allergens.
  • Moping of floors should be done.
  • Wash your hands after playing with pets.
  • Wash your bed linen and pajamas in hot water (above 130 degree) to kill dust mites.
  • Keep indoor humidity level between 30-40%Look for visible mold in the house especially in the basement.
  • Keep your bedroom allergy-free.