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Dr K K Aggarwal

Keeping blood pressure in the safe zone

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Keeping your BP below 120/80 is the ideal goal to avoid a host of afflictions, including heart disease, kidney failure and erectile dysfunction. When lifestyle changes fail to fix the problem, doctors tend to reach for the prescription pad and add medication.

  • Reduce sodium intake. DASH diet keeps sodium to 2,300 mg per day (about one teaspoon of salt). Cutting it to 1,500—not easy, but doable—works even better. The DASH diet can lower your systolic pressure (upper number) by 10 points or more.
  • Monitor your pressure at home. This can give you instant feedback on the benefits of diet and exercise and give you and your doctor a more accurate picture of your blood pressure. This is valuable, because some people experience “white coat hypertension,” in which blood pressure spikes higher than normal when measured at the doctor’s office.
  • Limit your alcohol intake. For men, the suggested limit is 1 to 2 alcoholic drinks per day, defined as 1.5 ounces (1 shot glass) of 80–proof spirits, a 5–ounce serving of wine, or a 12–ounce serving of beer. (For women it’s no more than one drink a day.)
  • Take more meds if you need to—but take the right ones.

(Healthbeat)

Alcohol: Benefits vs Risk

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • There is consensus that non drinkers should not start and the ones who drink can continue provided they do so in moderation and in absence of contraindications.
  • Persons who have been lifelong abstainers cannot be easily compared with moderate or even rare drinkers. Recommending alcohol intake to them even if they would agree to drink is not justified.
  • The diseases that moderate alcohol use prevents (such as coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and diabetes) are most prevalent in the elderly, men, and people with coronary heart disease risk factors. For these groups, moderate alcohol use is associated with a substantial mortality benefit relative to abstention or rare drinking.
  • For young to middle-aged adults, especially women, moderate alcohol use increases the risk of the most common causes of death (such as trauma and breast cancer).
  • Women who drink alcohol should take supplemental folate to help decrease the risk of breast cancer.
  • Men under the age of 45 may also experience more harm than benefit from alcohol consumption. In this age group, moderate alcohol use is unlikely to provide any mortality benefit, but consumption of less than one drink daily appears to be safe if temporally removed from operation of dangerous equipment. For individuals with established contraindications to alcohol use, even this level of alcohol use is dangerous.
  • Men can tolerate more alcohol than women. The ideal therapeutic dose of alcohol is around 6 g per day. Medically safe limits are 10 g in one hour, 20 g in a day and 70 g in a week. (50% for women).

Tips to prevent deficiency of Vitamin B12

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Avoid consumption of alcohol. Consuming alcohol in excess leads to gastritis and damages the intestinal lining. This can further interfere with absorption of vitamin B12.

Quit smoking. It has been observed that serum vitamin B12 levels are usually lower in smokers.

Have supplements. Vegetarian food is deficient in vitamin B12. Therefore, it is important to take a B12-containing multivitamin. Other than this, include soy foods and foods fortified with vitamin B12 in your diet.

Include vitamin B6 in your diet. This will help in the absorption and storage of vitamin B12. Spinach, walnuts, poultry, avocados, and bananas are good sources of B6.

Signs of Spiritual Awakening

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • More experiences of telepathy
  • More experiences of reverse telepathy
  • More spontaneous fulfillment of desires
  • Increased tendency to let things happen rather than make them happen. Work done with the least effort.
  • Change in the nature, more smiling, laughter and thankful nature.
  • Feelings of being connected with others and nature.
  • Frequent overwhelming episodes of appreciation.
  • Tendency to think and act spontaneously rather than from fears based on past experience.
  • Ability to enjoy each moment.
  • Living in the present.
  • Loss of worry.
  • A loss of interest in conflict.
  • A loss of interest in interpreting the actions of others.
  • A loss of interest in judging others and self.
  • Gaining the ability to love without expecting anything in return.
  • Quality of converting an adversity into opportunity.
  • Dislike for drugs, smoke and excess of alcohol.
  • Happiness in doing random acts of kindness.
  • Looking for good in every one.

Tips for a safe Holi

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Green and bluish green chemicals contain malachite green, which can be toxic to the eyes. Auramine, methyl violet, rhodamine and orange II are all phototoxic colors and can damage the skin.
  • Mica in Holi colors can damage the skin.
  • Instead of chemical dyes, one should use floral dyes. Flowers like Marigold, China rose, Butterfly Pea, Flame of the Forest etc. are used for the extraction of colors.
  • ‘Bhang’ or cannabis can precipitate acute abnormal mental behavior and psychosis. In the susceptible individuals, it can increase the heart rate and blood pressure. Pre treatment with a beta blocker can take away the bad effects of bhang.
  • Alcohol can impair judgment and make prone to accidents.
  • Balloons can cause blunt injuries to the eyes and precipitate head injuries.
  • Beware of date rape drugs. Do not play Holi with strangers.
  • Do not throw color at sensitive parts of the body, such as eyes. If color enters the eye, immediately wash it with a lot of water. If irritation persists, medical aid should be sought immediately.

IBD can be controlled through certain lifestyle modifications as follows.

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Identifying the foods that trigger the symptoms and avoiding them is crucial.
  2. Avoid beans, cabbage, and cauliflower as these can cause gas.
  3. Consume more of foods that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids.
  4. Eat smaller meals as this will help the digestive system to adjust better to the condition.
  5. Drink plenty of water and other fluids. However, limit the consumption of caffeine and alcohol.

Alcohol: Benefits Vs Risk

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • There is consensus that nondrinkers should not start and the ones who drink can continue provided they do so in moderation and in absence of contraindications. People tend to consume more alcohol in winter and near the New Year.
  • Persons who have been lifelong abstainers cannot be easily compared with moderate or even rare drinkers. Recommending alcohol intake to them even if they would agree to drink is not justified.
  • The diseases that moderate alcohol use prevents (such as coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and diabetes) are most prevalent in the elderly, men, and people with coronary heart disease risk factors. For these groups, moderate alcohol use is associated with a substantial mortality benefit relative to abstention or rare drinking.
  • For young to middle–aged adults, especially women, moderate alcohol use increases the risk of the most common causes of death (such as trauma and breast cancer).
  • Women who drink alcohol should take supplemental folate to help decrease the risk of breast cancer.
  • Men under the age of 45 may also experience more harm than benefit from alcohol consumption. In this age group, moderate alcohol use is unlikely to provide any mortality benefit, but consumption of less than one drink daily appears to be safe if temporally removed from operation of dangerous equipment. For individuals with established contraindications to alcohol use, even this level of alcohol use is dangerous.
  • Men can tolerate more alcohol than women. The ideal therapeutic dose of alcohol is around 6 grams per day. Medically safe limits are 10 grams in one hour, 20 grams in a day and 70 grams in a week. (50% for the women).

Dont start if you do not drink; if you cannot stop, limit your intake

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • The definition of a standard drink differs in countries: US = 14–15 gm alcohol equivalent to 12 oz beer, 5 oz wine and 1.5 oz 80 proof liquor; UK 8 gm alcohol, Japan 19.75 gm alcohol and India 10 gm alcohol
  • A standard drink usually means a US drink.
  • Alcohol contents: Beer 5%; Malt liquor 7%; Table wine 12%; Fortified wine (sherry, port) 17%; Cordial liquor (aperitif) 24%; Brandy (single jigger) 40% and 80 proof gin, Vodka, whisky 40%
  • 10 ml of alcohol (hard liquor) = 0.8 gm of alcohol; 1 oz = 30 ml; 12 oz of beer = 360 ml of beer (360×5% = 18 ml of alcohol = 14.4 gm of alcohol); 18 oz of beer = 8 to 9 oz of malt liquor = 5 oz of table wine = 3–4 oz of 45 wine = 2–3 oz of cordial liquor=1.5 oz of brandy=1.5 oz hard liquor
  • Binge drinking means 4 or more drinks at one time (women) or 5 or more at one time (men)
  • Heavy drinking means more than 7 drinks per week or 3 drinks per occasion (women) or more than 14 drinks per week or 4 drinks per occasion (men).
  • Moderate drinking means less than 2 drinks per day (women) and less than 3 drinks per day (men) and for people aged more than 65, less than two drinks per day
  • Safe limits: No level of alcohol compensation can be 100% safe for some people.
  • Contraindications: Pregnancy, present or strong family history of alcoholism, previous paralysis because of brain hemorrhage, liver disease, pancreas disease, running potentially dangerous equipment or machinery
  • Limit alcohol in acute gastritis, esophagitis, strong family history of breast cancer and pre cancerous GI lesions.
  • Ideal dose of alcohol = 6 gm per day
  • 10–15gm of ethanol is found in one glass of wine, one can or bottle of beer or one mixed drink.
  • One should not take more than two drinks (men) and one drink daily (women).
  • Men under the age of 45 may experience more harm than benefit from alcohol consumption.
  • Alcohol benefits for the heart are only in 45+ people.

Alcohol: Benefits Vs Risk

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. There is consensus that nondrinkers should not start and the ones who drink can continue provided they do so in moderation and in absence of contraindications.
  2. Persons who have been lifelong abstainers cannot be easily compared with moderate or even rare drinkers. Recommending alcohol intake to them even if they would agree to drink is not justified.
  3. The diseases that moderate alcohol use prevents (such as coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and diabetes) are most prevalent in the elderly, men, and people with coronary heart disease risk factors. For these groups, moderate alcohol use is associated with a substantial mortality benefit relative to abstention or rare drinking.
  4. For young to middle–aged adults, especially women, moderate alcohol use increases the risk of the most common causes of death (such as trauma and breast cancer).
  5. Women who drink alcohol should take supplemental folate to help decrease the risk of breast cancer.
  6. Men under the age of 45 may also experience more harm than benefit from alcohol consumption. In this age group, moderate alcohol use is unlikely to provide any mortality benefit, but consumption of less than one drink daily appears to be safe if temporally removed from operation of dangerous equipment. For individuals with established contraindications to alcohol use, even this level of alcohol use is dangerous.
  7. Men can tolerate more alcohol than women. The ideal therapeutic dose of alcohol is around 6 g per day. Medically safe limits are 10 g in one hour, 20 g in a day and 70 g in a week. (50% for the women).

Preventing a Peptic Ulcer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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An ulcer is a breakdown in the lining of the stomach or the first part of the small intestine. A type of bacterial infection (Helicobacter pylori) is the most frequent cause, but lifestyle factors may also raise the risk. The following preventive steps may ward off a peptic ulcer:

  1. Limit alcohol to no more than two drinks daily.
  2. Stop smoking or chewing tobacco.
  3. If you need to take painkillers, avoid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as naproxen, ibuprofen or aspirin.
  4. Consider, with your doctors approval, paracetamol instead.

Caffeine�Alcohol combination in paralysis

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A drug caffeinol containing caffeine and alcohol may help stroke patients recover.

In a small study at Texas Health Science Center in Houston, 60% of stroke patients who were given the drug, had no or minimal disability when they were discharged from the hospital. In contrast, only 26% of stroke survivors given standard therapy with tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, fared that well.

Caffeinol contains about as much caffeine as 5 to 7 cups of good, strong New Orleans coffee and the equivalent of two shots of alcohol.

The study involved 100 people who had suffered an ischemic stroke. All received intravenous tPA; 10 were also given an infusion of caffeinol. Caffeinol allows cells to tolerate reduced blood flow longer, thereby giving tPA a longer opportunity to do its action.

Will these findings be applicable to heart attack? Only time will tell as heart attack treatment is also done with tPA.

Seven Common Causes of Forgetfulness

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Lack of sleep is the most common cause. Too little restful sleep can also lead to mood changes and anxiety, which in turn can contribute to memory impairment.
  2. Many drugs can affect memory, which includes tranquilizers, antidepressants, blood pressure drugs and anti–allergic drugs.
  3. Low functioning thyroid can affect memory.
  4. Drinking too much alcohol can interfere with short–term memory.
  5. Stress and anxiety can lead to memory impairment. Both can interfere with attention and block the formation of new memory or retrieval of old memories.
  6. Forgetfulness can be a sign of depression or a consequence of it.
  7. If you are vegetarian, vitamin B12 deficiency can loss memory impairment.

What should you do if you dont have soap and clean, running water?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of microbes on them in most situations. If soap and water are not available use an alcohol based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 alcohol. Alcohol based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of microbes on hands in some situations but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs.

Alcohol: Benefits Vs Risk

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• There is consensus that nondrinkers should not start and the ones who drink can continue provided they do so in moderation and in absence of contraindications. People tend to consume more alcohol in winter and near the New Year.

• Persons who have been lifelong abstainers cannot be easily compared with moderate or even rare drinkers. Recommending alcohol intake to them even if they would agree to drink is not justified.

• The diseases that moderate alcohol use prevents (such as coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and diabetes) are most prevalent in the elderly, men, and people with coronary heart disease risk factors. For these groups, moderate alcohol use is associated with a substantial mortality benefit relative to abstention or rare drinking.

• For young to middle–aged adults, especially women, moderate alcohol use increases the risk of the most common causes of death (such as trauma and breast cancer).

• Women who drink alcohol should take supplemental folate to help decrease the risk of breast cancer.

• Men under the age of 45 may also experience more harm than benefit from alcohol consumption. In this age group, moderate alcohol use is unlikely to provide any mortality benefit, but consumption of less than one drink daily appears to be safe if temporally removed from operation of dangerous equipment. For individuals with established contraindications to alcohol use, even this level of alcohol use is dangerous.

• Men can tolerate more alcohol than women. The ideal therapeutic dose of alcohol is around 6 grams per day. Medically safe limits are 10 grams in one hour, 20 grams in a day and 70 grams in a week. (50% for the women).

Tips for safe driving

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• All through the year, especially during the holiday season, take steps to make sure that you and everyone you celebrate with avoids driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.

• Always designate a non–drinking driver before any holiday party or celebration begins.

• Arrange for someone to pick you up

• Do not let a friend drive if you think that they are impaired. Take the car keys.

• Stay overnight at your friend’s place, if possible and drive back home in the morning.