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Dr K K Aggarwal

The spiritual meaning of the word ‘Artha’

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha are the four fundamental principles of our very existence which means earning righteously with a desire to fulfill the inner happiness.

Righteous earning is called ‘Artha’ and mistakenly it has been linked to materialistic money. In mythology, Artha is synonymous with Lakshmi, Saraswati and Kali where Lakshmi represents righteously earned materialistic wealth, Saraswati represents wealth of knowledge and Kali represents wealth of wisdom to fight the bad in you and in the society.

In any country, it is the wealth of knowledge, which is more important. India was ruled initially by warriors (Kali), later by money (Lakshmi) and in future will be ruled by knowledge (Saraswati).

It is the human resources, which today decide the growth of a company and the amount of money invested. If you have good human resources, your company is going to succeed.

The spiritual meaning of the word ‘Artha’

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on The spiritual meaning of the word ‘Artha’

Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha are the four fundamental principles of our very existence which means earning righteously with a desire to fulfill the inner happiness.

Righteous earning is called ‘Artha’ and mistakenly it has been linked to materialistic money. In mythology, Artha is synonymous with Lakshmi, Saraswati and Kali where Lakshmi represents righteously earned materialistic wealth, Saraswati represents wealth of knowledge and Kali represents wealth of wisdom to fight the bad in you and in the society.

In any country, it is the wealth of knowledge, which is more important. India was ruled initially by warriors (Kali), later by money (Lakshmi) and in future will be ruled by knowledge (Saraswati).

It is the human resources, which today decide the growth of a company and the amount of money invested. If you have good human resources, your company is going to succeed.

Definition of Health

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Health is not mere absence of disease; it is a state of physical, mental, social, spiritual, environmental and financial well-being. Allopathy does not define all aspects of health.

During MBBS, medical students are taught more about the physical health. Social and mental health are covered only in few lectures. Community health is a separate subject but never given its due importance. Spiritual health is not defined at all and financial health is hardly covered.

Yet, in day-to-day practice it is the social, financial, spiritual and community health, which is the most important during patient-doctor communication. It is incorporated in the four basic purposes: dharma, artha, kama and moksha.

Dharma and artha together form the basis of karma which is righteous earning. You are what your deep rooted desires are. Most of the diseases today can be traced to a particular emotion, positive or negative. Anger and jealously are related with heart attack, fear with blood pressure, greed & possessiveness with heart failure. Unless the mind is healthy, one cannot be free of diseases.

The best description of health comes from Ayurveda. In Sanskrit health means swasthya, which means establishment in the self. One is established in the self when there is a union of mind, body and soul. Most symbols of health are established around a shaft with two snakes and two wings. The shaft represents the body, two snakes represent the duality of mind and the two wings represent the freedom of soul.

Sushrut Samhita in Chapter 15 shloka 10 defines the Ayurvedic person as under:

Samadosha, samagnischa,

Samadhatumalkriyah,

Prasannatmendriyamanah,

Swastha iti abhidhiyate.

From the Ayurvedic point of view, for a person to be healthy, he must have balanced doshas, balanced agni, balanced dhatus, normal functioning of malkriyas and mind, body, spirit and indriyas full of bliss and happiness.

Human body is made up of structures (Kapha) that perform two basic functions: firstly, metabolism (pitta) and movement (vata). Vata, pitta and kapha are called doshas in Ayurveda. Samana dosha means balance of structures, metabolism and movement functions in the body. Agni in Ayurveda is said to be in balance when a person has normal tejas and a good appetite.

Ayurveda describes seven dhatus: rasa, rakta, mamsa, medha, asthi, majja, shukra and they are required to be in balance. They are equivalent to various tissues in the human body.

Ayurveda necessitates proper functioning of natural urges like urination, stool, sweating and breathing and that is what balances in malakriya means.

Ayurveda says for a person to be healthy he has to be mentally and spiritually healthy which will only happen when his or her indriyas are cheerful, full of bliss and devoid of any negativities. For indriyas to be in balance one has to learn to control over the lust cum desires, greed and ego. This can be done by learning regular pranayama, learning the do’s and don’ts in life, living in a disciplined atmosphere and learn to live in the present.

Regular pranayama shifts one from sympathetic to para sympathetic mode, balances the mind and thoughts and helps in removing negative thoughts from the mind. For living a disabled life one can follow the yama and niyama of yoga sutras of Patanjali or dos and don’ts taught by various religious gurus, leaders and principles of naturopathy. Living in the present means conscious or meditative living. This involves either learning meditation 20 minutes twice a day or learning subtle mental exercises like mind–body relaxation, yogic shavasana, self–hypnotic exercises, etc.

According to Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, a person who eats thrice a day is a rogi, twice a day is a bhogi and once a day is yogi. The take home message is: to live more, eat less.

Swar yoga defines the importance of respiration and longevity. According to this yoga shastra, everybody has a fixed number of breaths to be taken during the life span.

Lesser the number a person takes in a minute more is the life. It also forms the basis of pranayama which is nothing but longer and deeper breathing with reduced respiratory rate. To be healthy one can remember to follow the principle of moderation and variety in diet & exercise, regular pranayama & meditation and positive thinking.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Do Your Duty with Discipline and Devotion

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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“Vasudhaiva kutumbakam” (the whole world is one family) and “Ekam Sat Viprah Bahudavanti” (truth is one but the wise call it by various names) are two basic statements, which come from the ancient Rig Veda and form the fundamentals of Vedic philosophy.

One should do one’s duty with devotion and discipline. This principle can be remembered as the principle of three Ds.

In daily routine, one should remember the purpose for which one is born, which is to fulfill Dharma (duty), Artha(wealth), Kama (desire) and Moksha (liberation). To achieve them, one needs to follow the four Fs: (i) Follow the teacher (ii) Face the negative devils of the mind (iii) Fight till the end, and (iv) Finish at the goal.

The essence of Bhagwad Gita can be summarized in one shloka (Chapter 2.48) where Krishna says to Arjuna “yogastha kuru karmani”, which means ‘concentrate on actions’ (do all actions while remaining in yoga). He further says that one should take success and failure in the same stride. (yogastha: = steadfast in yoga, kuru = perform, karmani = duties or action).

To acquire spiritual health, one should follow three Ss which are: (i) Satsang (company of good people) (ii)Sadhna (hard work), and (iii) Sanskar (good deeds). Adi Shankaracharya in Bhaj Govindam describes them as Satnam or Simran (bhakti, or reciting the name of their God), Satsang (company of good people) and Seva (good karmas).

Before doing any work, one should follow the principles of three Hs: (i) listen with the Head, (ii) follow the Heart to choose one of the choices and (iii) order the Hands to take an action.

The ABCs of a good professional are Availability, Behavior and Competence. Competence comes last; the first is the availability of the professional.

An action should be based on Truth; it should be coming from consciousness and should end in internal bliss. Various Vedic literatures have termed this triad by different names like satha, chitha, ananda, and satyam, shivam sundaram.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Writing a Vedic Will as I understand it

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Writing a Vedic Will as I understand it

Sometimes back, I used to think that a ‘will’ simply meant how my finances would be controlled by my wife and my children after my death. As I started acquiring Vedic knowledge, my interpretation changed. Following is the gist for writing a Will, as I understand it the Vedic way. Of course, writing a will requires a sound state of mind, two witnesses, signed registered paper with accompanying, if possible audio-visual link.

  • The first step is to calculate your life earnings. Your earnings are not only your finances earned but also the respect, dignity and image that you have earned in the society.
  • The next step then is to pay off your unpaid debts (Hrins). Apart from actual loans we have taken from banks, friends and others, there are three more debts (Hrins) which we need to pay before we die and define in our Will to be paid from our earning if we die unexpectedly. These as per mythology are Pitra Hrin, Dev Hrin and Rishi Hrin and mean that we have not been able to fulfil the committed desires of our ancestors and commitments made to our GOD and teachers, respectively. All these debts, if unpaid, need to be paid out of the finances you are leaving at the time of death. A percentage of your finances, therefore, should be kept to pay these debts. These commitments are usually fulfilled by the eldest son and eldest daughter, if there is no son or wife till she is alive.
  • Rest of the finances need to be divided to fulfil your Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha or purpose for which you were born.
    • Artha: A percentage of your finances should go and be equally divided within your immediate family. A percentage of this amount should be converted into a family trust account to be used for children below 18 years of age in future.
    • Dharma: Dharma in literal meaning is to hold. A percentage of your finances should be kept into a reserve account and this account interest can be used by the family only if they stick to the code of family conduct (includes rituals, religious activities etc.) you have created in your life and mentioned in the will or this amount may be given for charity as defined in your will.
    • Kama and Moksha: Kama means the unfulfilled desires at the level of intellect and ego and Moksha the same at the level of our soul.

We must enlist both our desires at the level of mind and at the level of soul and a percentage of our finances should be converted into a trust or defined to fulfil these desires. The examples of desires at the level of soul are to do some charitable work without any publicity. The same at the level of ego are to open some dispensary, dharamshala etc. in our own name. You also need to fulfil and document your desired rituals at the time of death. These rituals must answer the following questions:

  1. Should my death be celebrated (band, lunch) as I have completed all my purposes of life?
  2. How should my death anniversary be celebrated or observed?
  3. How should my last rites be done?

Final Note: If my children and wife are not willing to take care of the finances other than Artha, I nominate the following persons to manage my finance to look after my other desires……

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

The spiritual meaning of the word Artha

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on The spiritual meaning of the word Artha

Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha are the four fundamental principles of our very existence which means earning righteously with a desire to fulfill the inner happiness.

Righteous earning is called ‘Artha’ and mistakenly it has been linked to materialistic money.

In mythology, Artha is synonymous with Lakshmi, Saraswati and Kali where Lakshmi represents righteously earned materialistic wealth, Saraswati represents wealth of knowledge and Kali represents wealth of wisdom to fight the bad in you and in the society. In any country, it is the wealth of knowledge, which is more important. India was ruled initially by warriors (Kali), later by money (Lakshmi) and in future will be ruled by knowledge (Saraswati).

It is the human resources, which today decide the growth of a company and the amount of money invested. If you have good human resources, your company is going to succeed.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha of Medical Profession

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The eras of Ram and Krishna represent two different perceptions of life. While Rama taught us the message of truthfulness Krishna taught us when not to speak the truth and when speaking a lie is justified. The medical profession today cannot survive on the principles of Rama. According to principles of Krishna a truth which if spoken may cause harm to someone and if not spoken does not cause any harm may not be spoken. Similarly a lie which without harming the community may help a particular person or situation may be spoken. Doctors come across situations every day in their medical practice where speaking the truth may be harmful to the patient. Quite often false hopes are given and patients of terminal cancer are not told about their exact nature of illness and the prognosis. There is no way a doctor is going to tell the patient that you are going to die in the next 24 hours even if it is medically true. Dharma artha kama and moksha are the four basic purposes of life for which we are born. The basic purpose of life is to fulfill our desires in such a way that we end up in inner happiness. Fulfillment of desires should be done by following the principles of righteous or ethical earning. Most charges in the hospital settings are different depending upon the categories chosen by the patient. A single room patient invariably has to pay more than a patient admitted in the concessional three bed room or general ward. Even the charges of the treatment operation theatre investigations and consultations may be different depending upon the categories. Taking more money from the rich and helping the poor. This principle is more according to Krishna s principle than Rama s. Placebo therapy is a well established therapy in medical science which means treating the patient without giving the actual drug to a patient. The information that the drug does not contain any ingredient is withheld from the patient in this type of therapy. As per the literature 35 of illnesses and symptoms may resolve using a placebo and is based on the principle that the very feeling that a medicine is being given stimulates the inner body pharmacy and produces healing substances and chemicals. Nocebo effect on the other hand means that if the patient is told that your illness is not going to be cured even if medicines are given they may not act as the patient s body produces negative chemicals which neutralize the effect of medicines that otherwise are effective. Indian doctors were known for their social medicine which involves proper assessing of patients and their families financial status before deciding the treatment. There is no point giving options to a family to spend 10 15 lakhs of rupees for getting an ICD device implanted in the heart which may increase life span only by 1 or 2 years or improve quality of life for a few years to a family who cannot afford this amount of money and may have to sell their house or spend all the money saved for the marriage of their daughters. But today with the Consumer Protection Act applicable to the medical profession also not informing the family may even amount to negligence. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

The spiritual meaning of the word Artha

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on The spiritual meaning of the word Artha

Dharma Artha Kama and Moksha are the four fundamental principles of our very existence which means earning righteously with a desire to fulfill the inner happiness. Righteous earning is called Artha and mistakenly it has been linked to materialistic money. In mythology Artha is synonymous with Lakshmi Saraswati and Kali where Lakshmi represents righteously earned materialistic wealth Saraswati represents wealth of knowledge and Kali represents wealth of wisdom to fight the bad in you and in the society. In any country it is the wealth of knowledge which is more important. India was ruled initially by warriors Kali later by money Lakshmi and in future will be ruled by knowledge Saraswati . It is the human resources which today decide the growth of a company and the amount of money invested. If you have good human resources your company is going to succeed. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

The spiritual meaning of the word �Artha�

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on The spiritual meaning of the word �Artha�

Dharma Artha Kama and Moksha are the four fundamental principles of our very existence which means earning righteously with a desire to fulfill the inner happiness Righteous earning is called Artha and it has been mistakenly linked to materialistic money In mythology Artha is synonymous with Lakshmi Saraswati and Kali where Lakshmi represents righteously earned materialistic wealth Saraswati represents wealth of knowledge and Kali represents wealth of wisdom to fight the bad in you and in the society In any country it is the wealth of knowledge which is more important India was ruled initially by warriors Kali later by money Lakshmi and in future will be ruled by knowledge Saraswati It is the human resources which today decide the growth of a company and the amount of money invested If you have good human resources your company is going to succeed Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own

Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha of Medical Profession – Dr K K Aggarwal

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha of Medical Profession – Dr K K Aggarwal

The eras of Ram and Krishna represents two different perceptions of life. While Rama taught us the message of truthfulness, Krishna taught us when not to speak the truth and when is speaking a lie justified. The medical profession today cannot survive on the principles of Rama. According to principles of Krishna a truth which if spoken may cause harm to someone and if not spoken does not cause any harm may not be spoken. Similarly, a lie, which without harming the community may help a particular person or situation, may be spoken. In medical profession doctors come across situations every day, where speaking the truth may be harmful to the patient. Quite often false hopes are given and patients of terminal cancer are not told about their exact nature of illness and the prognosis. There is no way a doctor is going to tell the patient that you are going to die in the next 24 hours even if it is medically true. Dharma, artha, kama and moksha are the four basic purposes of life for which we are born. The basic purpose of life is to fulfil our desires in such a way that we end up in inner happiness. Fulfilment of desires should be done by following the principles of righteous or ethical earning. Most charges in the hospital settings are different depending upon the categories chosen by the patient. A single room patient invariably has to pay more than a patient admitted in the concessional three-bed room or general ward. Even the charges of the treatment, operation theatre, investigations and consultations may be different depending upon the categories. Taking more money from the rich and helping the poor. This principle is more according to Krishna’s principle than Rama’s. Placebo therapy is a well–established therapy in medical science, which means treating the patient without giving the actual drug to a patient. The information that the drug does not contain any ingredient is withheld from the patient in this type of therapy. As per the literature, 35% of the illnesses and symptoms may resolve using a placebo and is based on the principle that the very feeling that a medicine is being given stimulates the inner body pharmacy and produces healing substances and chemicals. Nocebo effect on the other hand means that if the patient is told that your illness is not going to be cured even if medicines are given they may not act as the patient’s body produces negative chemicals, which neutralize the effect of medicines that otherwise are effective. Indian doctors are known for their social medicine, which involves proper assessing of patients’ and their families’ financial status before deciding the treatment. There is no point giving options to a family to spend 10–15 lakhs of rupees for getting an ICD device implanted in the heart, which may increase life span only by one or two years or improve quality of life for a few years to a family who cannot afford this amount of money and may have to sell their house or spend all the money saved for the marriage of their daughters. But now with the Consumer Protection Act applicable to the medical profession, not informing the family may amount to negligence. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha of Medical Profession – Dr K K Aggarwal

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha of Medical Profession – Dr K K Aggarwal

The eras of Ram and Krishna represents two different perceptions of life. While Rama taught us the message of truthfulness, Krishna taught us when not to speak the truth and when is speaking a lie justified.

The medical profession today cannot survive on the principles of Rama. According to principles of Krishna a truth which if spoken may cause harm to someone and if not spoken does not cause any harm may not be spoken. Similarly, a lie, which without harming the community may help a particular person or situation, may be spoken.

In medical profession doctors come across situations every day, where speaking the truth may be harmful to the patient. Quite often false hopes are given and patients of terminal cancer are not told about their exact nature of illness and the prognosis. There is no way a doctor is going to tell the patient that you are going to die in the next 24 hours even if it is medically true.

Dharma, artha, kama and moksha are the four basic purposes of life for which we are born. The basic purpose of life is to fulfil our desires in such a way that we end up in inner happiness. Fulfilment of desires should be done by following the principles of righteous or ethical earning.

Most charges in the hospital settings are different depending upon the categories chosen by the patient. A single room patient invariably has to pay more than a patient admitted in the concessional three-bed room or general ward. Even the charges of the treatment, operation theatre, investigations and consultations may be different depending upon the categories. Taking more money from the rich and helping the poor. This principle is more according to Krishna’s principle than Rama’s.

Placebo therapy is a well–established therapy in medical science, which means treating the patient without giving the actual drug to a patient. The information that the drug does not contain any ingredient is withheld from the patient in this type of therapy. As per the literature, 35% of the illnesses and symptoms may resolve using a placebo and is based on the principle that the very feeling that a medicine is being given stimulates the inner body pharmacy and produces healing substances and chemicals.

Nocebo effect on the other hand means that if the patient is told that your illness is not going to be cured even if medicines are given they may not act as the patient’s body produces negative chemicals, which neutralize the effect of medicines that otherwise are effective.

Indian doctors are known for their social medicine, which involves proper assessing of patients’ and their families’ financial status before deciding the treatment. There is no point giving options to a family to spend 10–15 lakhs of rupees for getting an ICD device implanted in the heart, which may increase life span only by one or two years or improve quality of life for a few years to a family who cannot afford this amount of money and may have to sell their house or spend all the money saved for the marriage of their daughters.

But now with the Consumer Protection Act applicable to the medical profession, not informing the family may amount to negligence.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

Writing a Vedic Will – as I understand it

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Writing a Vedic Will – as I understand it

Sometimes back, I used to think that a ‘will’ simply meant how my finances would be controlled by my wife and my children after my death. As I started acquiring Vedic knowledge, my interpretation changed. Following is the gist for writing a Will, as I understand it the Vedic way. Of course, writing a will requires a sound state of mind, two witnesses, signed registered paper with accompanying, if possible audio-visual link.

• The first step is to calculate your life earnings. Your earnings are not only your finances earned but also the respect, dignity and image that you have earned in the society.

• Now the next step is to pay off your unpaid debts (Hrins). Apart from actual loans we have taken from banks, friends and others, there are three more debts (Hrins) which we need to pay before we die and define in our Will to be paid from our earning if we die unexpectedly. These as per mythology are Pitra Hrin, Dev Hrin and Rishi Hrin and mean that we have not been able to fulfill the committed desires of our ancestors and commitments made to our GOD and teachers respectively. All these debts, if unpaid, need to be paid out of the finances you are leaving at the time of death. A percentage of your finances, therefore, should be kept to pay these debts. These commitments are usually fulfilled by the eldest son and eldest daughter if there is no son or wife till she is alive.

• Rest of the finances need to be divided to fulfill your Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha or purpose for which you were born.

o Artha: A percentage of your finances should go and be equally divided within your immediate family. A percentage of this amount should be converted into a family trust account to be used for the minus 18 years of age children in future.

o Dharma: Dharma in literal meaning is to hold. A percentage of your finances should be kept into a reserve account and this account interest can be used by the family only if they stick to the code of family conduct (includes rituals, religious activities etc) you have created in your life and mentioned in the will or this amount may be given for charity as defined in your will.

o Kama and Moksha: Kama means the unfulfilled desires at the level of intellect and ego and Moksha the same at the level of our soul.

We must enlist both our desires at the level of mind and at the level of soul and a percentage of our finances should be converted into a trust or defined to fulfill these desires. The examples of desires at the level of soul are to do some charitable work without any publicity. The same at the level of ego are to open some dispensary, dharamshala etc. in our own name. You also need to fulfill and document your desired rituals at the time of death. These rituals must answer the following questions:

• Should my death be celebrated (band, lunch) as I have completed all my purposes of life?

• How should my death anniversary be celebrated or observed?

• How should my last rites be done?

Final Note: If my children and wife are not willing to take care of the finances other than Artha, I nominate the following persons to manage my finance to look after my other desires…….

as I understand it

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on as I understand it

Sometimes back, I regarded a ‘will’ to simply mean as to how my finances would be controlled by my wife and children after my death. But, as I started acquiring Vedic knowledge, my interpretation changed. Following is the gist for writing a Will, as I understand it the Vedic way. Of course, writing a will requires a sound state of mind, two witnesses, signed registered paper with accompanying, if possible audio-visual link.

1. The first step is to calculate your life earnings. The earning is not only your finances earned but also your respect, dignity and image earned in the society.

2. Now the next step is to pay off your unpaid debts (Hrins). Apart from actual loans we have taken from banks, friends and others, there are three more debts (Hrins) that we need to pay before we die and define in our Will to be paid from our earning if we die unexpectedly. These as per mythology are Pitra Hrin, Dev Hrin and Rishi Hrin. They means not been able to fulfill the committed desires of our ancestors and commitments made to our God and teachers respectively. All these debts, if unpaid, need to be paid out of the finances you are leaving at the time of death. A percentage of your finances, therefore, should be kept to pay these debts. These commitments are usually fulfilled by the eldest son and eldest daughter if there is no son or wife till she is alive.

3. Rest of my finances need to be divided to fulfill your Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha or purpose for which you were born.

a. Artha, a percentage of your finances should go and be equally divided within your immediate family. A percentage of this amount should be converted into a family trust account to be used for the minus 18 years of age children in future.

b. Dharma: Dharma literally means ‘to hold’. A percentage of your finances should be kept into a reserve account and this account interest can be used by the family only if they stick to the code of family conduct (includes rituals, religious activities etc) you have created in your life and mentioned in the will or this amount may be given for charity as defined in your will.

c. Kama and Moksha: Kama means unfulfilled desires at the level of intellect and ego and Moksha the same at the level of our soul. We must enlist both our desires at the level of mind and at the level of soul and a percentage of our finances should be converted into a trust or defined to fulfill these desires. The examples of desires at the level of soul are to do some charitable work without any publicity. The same at the level of ego are to open some dispensary, Dharamshala etc. on our own name. In your desires you also need to fulfill and document your desired rituals at the time of death. These rituals must answer the following questions

i. Should my death be celebrated (band, lunch) as I completed all my purposes of life?

ii. How should my death anniversary be celebrated or observed?

iii. What should be my last rites? Final Note: If my children and wife are not willing to take care of the finances other than Artha, I nominate the following persons to manage my finance to look after my other desires

Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha of Medical Profession

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha of Medical Profession

The eras of Ram and Krishna represent two different perceptions of life. While Rama taught us the message of truthfulness, Krishna taught us when not to speak the truth and when speaking a lie is justified. The medical profession today cannot survive on the principles of Rama. According to principles of Krishna, a truth which if spoken may cause harm to someone and if not spoken does not cause any harm, may not be spoken. Similarly, a lie, which without harming the community may help a particular person or situation, may be spoken. Doctors come across situations every day in their medical practice, where speaking the truth may be harmful to the patient. Quite often false hopes are given and patients of terminal cancer are not told about their exact nature of illness and the prognosis. There is no way a doctor is going to tell the patient that you are going to die in the next 24 hours even if it is medically true.

Dharma, artha, kama and moksha are the four basic purposes of life for which we are born. The basic purpose of life is to fulfill our desires in such a way that we end up in inner happiness. Fulfillment of desires should be done by following the principles of righteous or ethical earning. Most charges in the hospital settings are different depending upon the categories chosen by the patient. A single room patient invariably has to pay more than a patient admitted in the concessional three–bed room or general ward. Even the charges of the treatment, operation theatre, investigations and consultations may be different depending upon the categories. Taking more money from the rich and helping the poor. This principle is more according to Krishna’s principle than Rama’s.

Placebo therapy is a well–established therapy in medical science, which means treating the patient without giving the actual drug to a patient. The information that the drug does not contain any ingredient is withheld from the patient in this type of therapy. As per the literature, 35% of illnesses and symptoms may resolve using a placebo and is based on the principle that the very feeling that a medicine is being given stimulates the inner body pharmacy and produces healing substances and chemicals. Nocebo effect, on the other hand, means that if the patient is told that your illness is not going to be cured even if medicines are given they may not act as the patient’s body produces negative chemicals, which neutralize the effect of medicines that otherwise are effective.

Indian doctors were known for their social medicine, which involves proper assessing of patients’ and their families’ financial status before deciding the treatment. There is no point giving options to a family to spend 10–15 lakhs of rupees for getting an ICD device implanted in the heart, which may increase life span only by 1 or 2 years or improve quality of life for a few years to a family who cannot afford this amount of money and may have to sell their house or spend all the money saved for the marriage of their daughters.

But today, with the Consumer Protection Act applicable to the medical profession also, not informing the family may even amount to negligence.

Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha of Medical Profession

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The eras of Ram and Krishna represent two different perceptions of life. While Rama taught us the message of truthfulness, Krishna taught us when not to speak the truth and when speaking a lie is justified.

The medical profession today cannot survive on the principles of Rama. According to principles of Krishna, a truth which if spoken may cause harm to someone and if not spoken does not cause any harm, may not be spoken. Similarly, a lie, which without harming the community may help a particular person or situation, may be spoken.

Doctors come across situations every day in their medical practice, where speaking the truth may be harmful to the patient. Quite often false hopes are given and patients of terminal cancer are not told about their exact nature of illness and the prognosis. There is no way a doctor is going to tell the patient that you are going to die in the next 24 hours even if it is medically true.

Dharma, artha, kama and moksha are the four basic purposes of life for which we are born. The basic purpose of life is to fulfill our desires in such a way that we end up in inner happiness. Fulfillment of desires should be done by following the principles of righteous or ethical earning.

Most charges in the hospital settings are different depending upon the categories chosen by the patient. A single room patient invariably has to pay more than a patient admitted in the concessional three-bed room or general ward. Even the charges of the treatment, operation theatre, investigations and consultations may be different depending upon the categories. Taking more money from the rich and helping the poor. This principle is more according to Krishna’s principle than Rama’s.

Placebo therapy is a well–established therapy in medical science, which means treating the patient without giving the actual drug to a patient. The information that the drug does not contain any ingredient is withheld from the patient in this type of therapy. As per the literature, 35% of illnesses and symptoms may resolve using a placebo and is based on the principle that the very feeling that a medicine is being given stimulates the inner body pharmacy and produces healing substances and chemicals.

Nocebo effect, on the other hand, means that if the patient is told that your illness is not going to be cured even if medicines are given they may not act as the patient’s body produces negative chemicals, which neutralize the effect of medicines that otherwise are effective.

Indian doctors were known for their social medicine, which involves proper assessing of patients’ and their families’ financial status before deciding the treatment. There is no point giving options to a family to spend 10–15 lakhs of rupees for getting an ICD device implanted in the heart, which may increase life span only by one or two years or improve quality of life for a few years to a family who cannot afford this amount of money and may have to sell their house or spend all the money saved for the marriage of their daughters.

But today, with the Consumer Protection Act applicable to the medical profession also, not informing the family may even amount to negligence.