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Dr K K Aggarwal

Women beware of heart disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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More women die of cardiovascular disease than from the next four causes of death combined, including all forms of cancer. Over 80 percent of cardiac events in women can be prevented by modifying diet, exercise and abstinence from smoking. The following may be the warning signals of heart attack:

  • Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain in the center of the chest. It lasts more than a few minutes, or goes away and comes back.
  • Pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  • Breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.
  • Chest pain or discomfort is a presenting symptom in women, but they are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting and back or jaw pain.

In presence of any of the above one should not wait for more than five minutes and get to a hospital right away.

Beware of fatty liver

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) means presence of hepatic steatosis (fatty liver), when no other causes for secondary hepatic fat accumulation (heavy alcohol consumption) are present.
  2. NAFLD, if not treated, may progress to cirrhosis and is likely an important cause of cryptogenic cirrhosis.
  3. NAFLD is subdivided into: Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) or simple fatty liver with no liver inflammation and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) or fatty liver with liver inflammation
  4. Patients with NAFLD may have mild or moderate elevations in SGOT and SGPT levels (liver enzymes).
  5. Normal SGOT and SGPT levels, however, do not exclude NAFLD.
  6. When elevated, the SGOT and SGPT levels are typically 2 to 5 times the upper limit of normal.
  7. In acute viral hepatitis, the SGOT/SGPT ratio is less than 1 (unlike alcoholic fatty liver disease, which typically has a ratio greater than 2)
  8. The degree of SGOT and SGPT elevation does not predict the degree of liver inflammation or fibrosis, and a normal SGOT, SGPT levels does not exclude clinically important histologic injury.
  9. The alkaline phosphatase may be elevated to 2 to 3 times the upper limit of normal.
  10. Serum albumin and bilirubin levels are typically within the normal range, but may be abnormal in patients who have developed cirrhosis. When cirrhosis sets in, one may have prolonged prothrombin time and cytopenias.
  11. A serum ferritin greater than 1.5 times the upper limit of normal in patients with NAFLD may mean presence of inflammation

Elderly should Beware of Commonly Prescribed Group of Drugs

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Anticholinergics, a commonly prescribed group of drugs, may cause elderly people to “slow down” in their daily physical activities.

Two reports from Wake Forest University School of Medicine support findings that anti-cholinergic drugs used to treat acid reflux, Parkinson’s disease and urinary incontinence may cause older people to lose their thinking skills more quickly than those who do not take the medicines.

Anticholinergic drugs work by stopping acetylcholine, a chemical that enhances communication between nerve cells in the brain, from binding to its receptors in nerve cells.

Older adults taking anticholinergics become more likely to walk more slowly and to need help in other daily activities. These results are true even in older adults who have normal memory and thinking abilities.

For older adults taking a moderately anticholinergic medication, or two or more mildly anticholinergic medications, their function is similar to that of someone three to four years older.

Common anticholinergic medicines include blood pressure medication, nifedipine; the stomach antacid, ranitidine, and the incontinence medication, tolterodine.

Cholinesterase inhibitors, a family of drugs used to treat dementia by increasing levels of acetylcholine include donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine and tacrine. About 10 percent of patients may be taking tolterodine and dozepezil together. The two drugs are pharmacological opposites, which led to the hypothesis that the simultaneous treatment of dementia and incontinence could lead to reduced effectiveness of one or both drugs.

Elderly Beware of Commonly Prescribed Group of Drugs

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Anticholinergics, a commonly prescribed group of drugs, may cause elderly people to “slow down” in their daily physical activities.

Two reports from Wake Forest University School of Medicine support findings that anticholinergic drugs – used to treat acid reflux, Parkinson’s disease and urinary incontinence –– may cause older people to lose their thinking skills more quickly than those who do not take the medicines.

Anti-cholinergic drugs work by stopping acetylcholine, a chemical that enhances communication between nerve cells in the brain, from binding to its receptors in nerve cells.

Older adults taking anticholinergics become more likely to walk more slowly and to need help in other daily activities. These results are true even in older adults who have normal memory and thinking abilities.

For older adults taking a moderately acting anticholinergic medication, or two or more mildly acting anticholinergic medications, their function is similar to that of someone 3 to 4 years older.

Common anticholinergic medicines include blood pressure medication, nifedipine; the stomach antacid, ranitidine, and the incontinence medication, tolterodine.

Cholinesterase inhibitors, a family of drugs used to treat dementia by increasing levels of acetylcholine include donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine and tacrine. About 10 percent of patients may be taking tolterodine and dozepezil together. The two drugs are pharmacological opposites, which led to the hypothesis that the simultaneous treatment of dementia and incontinence could lead to reduced effectiveness of one or both drug.

Beware of Synthetic Milk

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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It is not milk
It is made up of urea, caustic soda, refined oil (cheap cooking oil) and common detergents.
Detergents are used as they emulsify and dissolve the oil in water giving the frothy solution, the characteristic white color of milk. Refined oil is used as a substitute for milk fat. Caustic soda is added to the blended milk to neutralize the acidity and preventing it from turning sour during transport. Urea/ sugar are added for solid–not–fat (SNF), to provide whiteness in milk and natural milk taste.
It looks like natural milk, except in taste and nutritional qualities.
It is normally mixed with milk and then sold in the market
It is carcinogenic in humans
Urea and caustic soda can harm liver and kidneys.
Caustic soda with high sodium content is harmful for patients with high blood pressure.
Caustic soda also deprives the body from utilizing lysine, an essential amino acid in milk, which is required by growing babies.

Heart Patients Beware of summer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Dehydration can precipitate heart attack in susceptible individuals. The normal fluid requirement is 30 ml per kg weight, but the same needs to be increased in the summer because of the loss of fluid from sweating. Apart from water, sodium or salt is also lost. A person, therefore, needs to take more fruits during summer period.

Not passing urine in eight hours, dry armpits, feeling exhausted or feeling weak are suggestive of underlying dehydration. Dehydration can make the blood thick and precipitate heart attack in patients with uncontrolled blood pressure or diabetes.

Walking is a necessity for heart patients and the same should be continued even during peak summer but the timing should be so chosen that peak heat periods are avoided. One can walk early in the morning or late in the evening. People taking anti–allergic pills should take special precautions as they are more likely to get heat stroke.

Heat stroke is a medical emergency leading to charring of organs because of extreme internal heat. A person’s temperature may be more than 105°F.

Elderly Beware of Commonly Prescribed Group of Drugs

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Elderly Beware of Commonly Prescribed Group of Drugs

Anti–cholinergics, a commonly prescribed group of drugs, may cause elderly people to “slow down” in their daily physical activities.

Two reports from Wake Forest University School of Medicine support findings that anti–cholinergic drugs – Used to treat acid reflux, Parkinson’s disease and urinary incontinence –– may cause older people to lose their thinking skills more quickly than those who do not take the medicines.

Anti–cholinergic drugs work by blocking acetylcholine, a chemical that enhances communication between nerve cells in the brain, from binding to its receptors in nerve cells.

Older adults taking anti–cholinergics become more likely to walk more slowly and to need help in other daily activities. These results are true even in older adults who have normal memory and thinking abilities.

For older adults taking a moderately anticholinergic medication, or two or more mildly anticholinergic medications, their function is similar to that of someone three to four years older.

Common anticholinergic medicines include blood pressure medication, nifedipine; the stomach antacid, ranitidine, and the incontinence medication, tolterodine.

Cholinesterase inhibitors, a family of drugs used to treat dementia by increasing levels of acetylcholine include donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine and tacrine. About 10 percent of patients may be taking tolterodine and dozepezil together. The two drugs are pharmacological opposites, which led to the hypothesis that the simultaneous treatment of dementia and incontinence could lead to reduced effectiveness of one or both drugs.