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Dr K K Aggarwal

Harvards Medical schools 4 exercising tips for people with diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Get a “preflight” check

  1. Talk with your doctor before you start or change a fitness routine.
  2. Especially if you are overweight or have a history of heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, or diabetic neuropathy.
  3. Go for a complete physical exam and an exercise stress test for people if you are 35 or older and who have had diabetes for more than 10 years. The results can help determine the safest way for you to increase physical activity.

Spread your activity throughout the week

  1. Adults should aim for a weekly total of at least 160 minutes of moderate aerobic activity, or 80 minutes of vigorous activity, or an equivalent mix of the two.
  2. Be active at least 3 to 5 days a week.

Time your exercise wisely

  1. The best time to exercise is 1 to 3 hours after eating, when your blood sugar level is likely to be higher.
  2. If you use insulin, it’s important to test your blood sugar before exercising. If it is below 100 mg/dL, eat a piece of fruit or have a small snack to boost it and help you avoid hypoglycemia. Test again 30 minutes later to see if your blood sugar level is stable.
  3. Check your blood sugar after any particularly grueling workout or activity.
  4. If you use insulin, your risk of developing hypoglycemia may be highest 6 to 12 hours after exercising.
  5. Do not exercise if your blood sugar is too high (over 250).

Be prepared

  1. Should you experience a medical problem while exercising (or at any time) it is important that the people who care for you know that you have diabetes.
  2. Keep card handy or glucose tablets with you while exercising in case your blood sugar takes a sudden nosedive.

5 steps to lower Alzheimers risk

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Maintain a healthy weight
  2. Check your waistline
  3. Eat mindfully
  4. Exercise regularly
  5. Keep an eye on important health numbers (cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, blood sugar)

(Source: Harvard Healthbeat)

Facts about exercise

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Exercise for 80 minutes a day and brisk exercise 80 minutes a week. The speed of walking should be at least 80 steps per minute. Do resistance or weight bearing exercises twice in a week. Avoid doing strenuous exercises for the first time in life after the age of 40. According to Ayurveda one should exercise to his or her body type. Diabetics who exercise should not exercise if blood sugar is lower than 90. In conditions of smog avoid walking early in the morning till sunlight appears.

Managing Diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• People with pre diabetes are at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and Paralysis.

• More than 25% people have pre diabetes (blood sugar level more than 90 but below 126 mg/dL) but only 4% know it needs attention.

• Diabetes is not just controlling blood sugar. Controlling BP (<120/80) and LDL bad cholesterol (<70) is equally important.

• Smokers face 44% increased risk of diabetes when compared to nonsmokers (Swiss researchers JAMA)

• Advancing age, diabetes, high BP, obesity, smoking, drugs, heart diseases, alcohol, cycling for > 3 hours/week can cause erectile dysfunction.

• Each 1 mg increase in serum uric acid increases the risk of developing diabetes by 18%.

• Keep your fasting sugar, lower BP, bad cholesterol, abdominal girth all below 80.

• Recent studies have shown that people at risk of type 2 diabetes can prevent onset of diseases by losing 5 to 7% body weight.

• Patients with diabetes should drive only if their blood sugar is under control and there is no evidence of end organ disqualifying disease.

• Significant snoring with episodes of cessation of respiration during night can lead to diabetes.

• Treating depression may help people with diabetes get their blood sugar under control.

• Sudden cardiac death is preventable – keep your diabetes under control.

• If BP and diabetes are kept under control, 75% dialysis and transplants can be prevented.

• One in five patients with diabetes have abnormal Treadmill Stress Test

• Patients with metabolic syndrome are 5 times more likely to develop diabetes (National Heart, Lung, Blood Institute).

• Diabetic patients have similar risk as non–diabetics with one heart attack.

• Fifty percent of diabetic patients may have associated high blood pressure.

• Uncontrolled diabetes can cause heart attack.

• Hypertension and diabetes together raise the chances of heart attack manifold.

• Diabetics can have heart attack without the classical symptom of pain.

• Diabetes can remain silent for over five years.

• Uncontrolled diabetes can cause impotence. • Uncontrolled diabetes can cause blindness.

• Uncontrolled diabetes can cause paralysis.

All hypertensive patients should keep their blood sugar below 90mg

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Hypertension is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. If not properly managed, patients with high BP are likely to end up with diabetes with subsequent high risk of kidney damage. The results of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA) study has shown that the major predictor of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension is high baseline fasting plasma glucose levels more than 90mg%. The risk increases by 5.8 times for each 18mg% rise above 90 mg%. The other risk factors are higher weight, higher blood pressure and higher triglyceride levels. High BP patients on atenolol (beta blocker drug) regimen with or without a diuretic are also at risk. On the other hand high BP patients on amlodipine (calcium blocker) ± perindopril (ACE inhibitor), with high good HDL cholesterol levels, moderate alcohol use, and age older than 55 years had protection from developing diabetes.