Sub Logo

Dr K K Aggarwal

Let the mud settle down

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Let the mud settle down

Once, Buddha, while traveling, happened to pass a lake. Buddha told one of his disciples, I am thirsty. Do get me some water from that lake there.

The disciple noticed that some people were washing clothes in the water and, right at that moment, a bullock cart started crossing through the lake. As a result, the water became very muddy, very turbid. The disciple thought, how can I give this muddy water to Buddha to drink! So he came back and told Buddha – The water in there is very muddy. I don’t think it is fit to drink.

After about an hour later Buddha asked the same disciple again to go back to the lake and get him some water to drink. This time the disciple found that the lake had absolutely clear water in it. The mud had settled down and the water was fit for drinking. So he collected some water in a pot and brought it to Buddha.

Buddha looked at the water and said – See what you did to make the water clean. You let it be … and the mud settled down on its own and you got clear water… Your mind is also like that. When it is disturbed, just let it be. Give it a little time. It will settle down on its own. You don’t have to put in any effort to calm it down. It will happen. It is effortless.

The Vedic meaning of Mahamritunjaya Mantra and the Gayatri Mantra

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Health Care - Ask Dr KK | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on The Vedic meaning of Mahamritunjaya Mantra and the Gayatri Mantra

Any activity should always engage the 3 H model of Heart, the Head and the Hand. The same has been advocated by western scholars of today. The concept is that while doing any work, you should ask the head for choices and then refer these choices to the heart to choose one and finally order the hands to carry out that action.

Deepak Chopra also talks about this in his book ‘The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success’. He writes that conscious–based decisions are the best decisions. Before taking any decision he recommends asking the body for the signals of comfort or discomfort and if the signals of discomfort are perceived, then one should not carry out that action.

All the above concepts come from our ancient Vedic knowledge. The two main mantras of our times are the Mahamritunjaya Mantra and the Gayatri Mantra.

The Mahamritunjaya Mantra is from the Rig Veda and needs initiation for attaining any Siddhi. This is the greatest reliever from all evils and reads as under: Aum Trayambakam Yajamahe, Sugandhim Pushtivardhanam; Urva Rukamiva Bandhanan, Mrityor Mokshiye Mamritat. It means we worship Shiva – The Three–Eyed Lord, who is fragrant and nourishes all beings; May he protect us (bandhanan) from all big (urva) diseases (aarookam). May he liberate us (mokshiye) from death (mrityor), For the sake of immortality (mamritat, amrit); as the cucumber is automatically liberated, from its bondage from the creeper when it fully ripens.

The meaning of the mantra is the importance of the third eye and the benefits of its opening. The two eyes are at the level of the physical body. The third eye means the eyes of the mind and the eyes of the soul. It also indicates that in difficulty one should look inward from the eyes of the mind and ask for choices. Like the cucumber, one should choose the good ones and drop the bad choices.

The mantra for the conscious–based decision comes from Gayatri mantra: Om Bhur Bhuvaha Suvaha Thath Savithur Varenyam Bhargo Devasya Dheemahi Dhiyo Yonaha Prachodayath. It means we meditate on the glory of the Creator; who has created the Universe; who is worthy of Worship; who is the embodiment of Knowledge and Light; who is the remover of all Sin and Ignorance; may He enlighten our Intellect.

It talks about the importance of conscious–based decisions and its directions to the intellect to choose the right and not the convenient actions.

The Gayatri Mantra is the Vedic prayer to illuminate the intellect. Gayatri is considered as Vedasara –– “the essence of the Vedas.” Veda means knowledge, and this prayer fosters and sharpens the knowledge–yielding faculty. As a matter of fact, the four mahavakyas or ‘core–declarations’ enshrined in the four Vedas are implied in this Gayatri mantra.

Choosing the right decision from the consciousness was later defined by Buddha. He taught that before any action ask yourself the following four questions and if the answer to any of the question is no, then avoid that action. These four questions are: is it the truth, is it necessary, will the actions bring happiness to you and to others.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

How to remove negative thoughts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on How to remove negative thoughts

Darkness is the absence of light and similarly, negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts. The answer to negative thoughts is to bring back positive thoughts. An idle mind is the devil’s workshop and so will always think negative. Here are some ways by which you can get rid your negative thoughts.
  • Think differently as taught by Adi Shankaracharya. Once Menaka approached Arjuna with lust and said that she wanted to have a son like him with him. Arjuna said that why wait for 25 years consider me as you son from today.
  • Think opposite as taught by Patanjali. For example, if you are having a thought to steal, silently start thinking of charity.
  • Think positive as taught by Buddha. Make a list of positive actions to be done today as the first thing in the morning and concentrate on that list. Divert your mind to your list of pending jobs. This is a type of behavioral therapy.
(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Should doctors smile while talking to their patients?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Should doctors smile while talking to their patients?

Bhagavad Gita 2.10 “Tam uvāca hṛṣīkeśaḥ prahasann iva bhārata senayor ubhayor madhye viṣīdantam idaṁ vacaḥ” Tam—unto him; uvāca—said; hṛṣīkeśaḥ—the master of the senses, Kṛṣṇa; prahasan—smiling; iva—like that; bhārata—O Dhṛtarāṣṭra, descendant of Bharata; senayoḥ—of the armies; ubhayoḥ—of both parties; madhye—between; viṣīdantam—unto the lamenting one; idam—the following; vacaḥ—words. Translation: “O descendant of Bharata, at that time Kṛṣṇa, smiling, in the midst of both the armies, spoke the following words to the grief-stricken Arjuna.” The answer comes in Bhagavad Gita, the first text book of counseling. When grief ridden Arjuna approaches Krishna, he starts his counseling in a happy and smiling mood. Arjuna was grief-filled, sad and rebellious. Yet Krishna smiled. The word in the Gita is prahasann, which means to smile before laughing (beginning to laugh). It was not a weak or full smile or a sarcastic grimace, but a very positive smile. Half of grief/apprehension is alleviated if a patient sees his doctor smiling or the relatives see a smile on the face of a doctor coming out of Operation Theater. It also gives confidence to the patient (Arjuna) that his doctor (Krishna) has understood his problem fully and has a solution to his problem. Buddha is also shown smiling and Goddess Kushmanda is also shown with a smiling face.

Let the mud settle down

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Let the mud settle down

Once Buddha while travelling happened to pass a lake. Buddha told one of his disciples, I am thirsty. Do get me some water from that lake there.

The disciple noticed that some people were washing clothes in the water and, right at that moment, a bullock cart started crossing through the lake. As a result, the water became very muddy, very turbid. The disciple thought, how can I give this muddy water to Buddha to drink! So he came back and told Buddha, The water in there is very muddy. I don’t think it is fit to drink.

After about an hour later Buddha asked the same disciple again to go back to the lake and get him some water to drink. This time the disciple found that the lake had absolutely clear water in it. The mud had settled down and the water was fit for drinking. So he collected some water in a pot and brought it to Buddha.

Buddha looked at the water and said, See what you did to make the water clean. You let it be … and the mud settled down on its own and you got clear water… Your mind is also like that. When it is disturbed, just let it be. Give it a little time. It will settle down on its own. You don’t have to put in any effort to calm it down. It will happen. It is effortless.


Should doctors smile while talking to their patients?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Should doctors smile while talking to their patients?

Bhagavad Gita 2.10: tam uva ca hṛṣīkeśaḥ, prahasann iva bhārata, senayor ubhayor madhye, viṣīdantam idaḿ vacaḥ SYNONYMS: tam — unto him; uvāca — said; hṛṣīkeśaḥ — the master of the senses, Kṛṣṇa; prahasan — smiling; iva — like that; bhārata — O Dhṛtarāṣṭra, descendant of Bharata; senayoḥ — of the armies; ubhayoḥ — of both parties; madhye — between; viṣīdantam — unto the lamenting one; idam — the following; vacaḥ — words.

TRANSLATION: O descendant of Bharata, at that time Krishna, smiling, in the midst of both the armies, spoke the following words to the grief-stricken Arjuna. The answer comes in Bhagavad Gita, the first text book of counseling. When grief-ridden Arjuna approaches him, he starts his counseling in happy and smiling mood. Arjuna was grief-filled, sad and rebellious. Yet Krishna smiled.

The word in the Gita is prahasann, which means to smile before laughing (beginning to laugh). It was not a weak or full smile or a sarcastic grimace, but a very positive smile.

The grief of a patient halves if he sees his doctor smiling or the relatives see a smile on the face of the doctor coming out of the operation theater. In a situation like in Bhagavad Gita, it also gives confidence to the patient (Arjuna) that his doctor (Krishna) has understood his problem fully and has a solution to his problem. Buddha is also shown smiling and Goddess Kushmanda is also shown with a smiling face.

 

Let the mud settle down

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Let the mud settle down

Once Buddha while travelling happened to pass a lake. Buddha told one of his disciples, I am thirsty. Do get me some water from that lake there.

The disciple noticed that some people were washing clothes in the water and, right at that moment, a bullock cart started crossing through the lake. As a result, the water became very muddy, very turbid. The disciple thought, how can I give this muddy water to Buddha to drink! So he came back and told Buddha, The water in there is very muddy. I don’t think it is fit to drink.

After about an hour later Buddha asked the same disciple again to go back to the lake and get him some water to drink. This time the disciple found that the lake had absolutely clear water in it. The mud had settled down and the water was fit for drinking. So he collected some water in a pot and brought it to Buddha.

Buddha looked at the water and said, See what you did to make the water clean. You let it be … and the mud settled down on its own and you got clear water… Your mind is also like that. When it is disturbed, just let it be. Give it a little time. It will settle down on its own. You don’t have to put in any effort to calm it down. It will happen. It is effortless.

Darkness is absence of light and similarly negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts. The answer to negative thoughts is to bring positive thoughts back. Ideal mind is devils workshop and will always think negative.

Here are the ways
1.      Think differently as taught by Adi Shankracharya. Once Menka approached Arjuna with lust and said that she wanted to have a son like him with him. Arjuna said that why wait for 25 years consider me as you son from today.
2.      Think opposite as taught by Patanjali. For example if you are having a though to steal, silently start thinking of charity
3.      Think positive as taught by Buddha. Make a list of positive action to be done today as the first thing in the morning and concentrate on that list. Divert your mind to the pending works. It’s a type of behavioral therapy.

How to remove negative thoughts

By
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on How to remove negative thoughts

Darkness is absence of light and similarly negative thoughts are
absence of positive thoughts. The answer to negative thoughts is to
bring positive thoughts back. Ideal mind is devils workshop and will
always think negative.
Here are the ways
1.      Think differently as taught by Adi Shankracharya. Once Menka
approached Arjuna with lust and said that she wanted to have a son
like him with him. Arjuna said that why wait for 25 years consider me
as you son from today.
2.      Think opposite as taught by Patanjali. For example if you are
having a though to steal, silently start thinking of charity
3.      Think positive as taught by Buddha. Make a list of positive action
to be done today as the first thing in the morning and concentrate on
that list. Divert your mind to the pending works. It’s a type of
behavioral therapy.

Any activity should always engage the 3 H model – of Heart, Head, and the Hand. The same has been advocated by the western scholars of today. The concept means that while doing any work one should ask the head for choices and then refer these choices to the heart to choose one and finally order the hands to do the action.

Deepak Chopra also talks about this in great details in his book ‘The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success’. He writes that conscious-based decisions are the best decisions. Before taking any decision he recommends asking the body for the signals of comfort or discomfort and if the signals of discomfort are perceived, then one should not indulge into that action.

All the above concepts come from our ancient Vedic knowledge. The two main mantras are the Mahamrityunjaya Mantra and the Gayatri Mantra.

The Mahamritunjaya Mantra comes from the Rig Veda. This is the greatest reliever from all evils and reads as under: Aum Trayambakam Yajamahe, Sugandhim Pushtivardhanam, Urva Rukamiva Bandhanan, Mrityor Mokshiye Mamritat. It means we worship Shiva – The Three-Eyed Lord; who is fragrant and nourishes all beings; May he protect us (bandhan) from all big (urva) diseases (aarookam). May he liberate us (mokshiye) from death (mrityor), For the sake of immortality (mamritat, amrit); as the cucumber is automatically liberated, from its bondage from the creeper when it fully ripens.

The meaning of the manta is the importance of the third eye and the benefits of its opening. The two eyes are at the level of the physical body. The third eye means the eyes of the mind and the eyes of the soul. It also indicates that in difficulty one should look inward from the eyes of the mind and ask for the choices. Like the cucumber, one should chose the good ones and drop the bad choices. (Jo acha lage use apna lo; Jo bura lage use jaane do).

The mantra for the conscious-based decision comes from Gayatri Mantra. The same reads as Om Bhur Bhuva Svah Tat Savutur Varenyam Bhargo Devasya Dheemahi Dhiyo Yo Nah Prachodayaat. It means that we meditate on the glory of the Creator; who has created the Universe; who is worthy of Worship; who is the embodiment of Knowledge and Light; who is the remover of all Sin and Ignorance; may He enlighten our Intellect. It talks about the importance of conscious-based decisions and its directions to the intellect to choose the right and not the convenient actions.

The Gayatri Mantra is the Vedic prayer to illuminate the intellect. Gayatri is considered as Vedasara or “the essence of the Vedas.” Veda means knowledge, and this prayer fosters and sharpens the knowledge-yielding faculty. As a matter of fact, the four mahavakyas or ‘core-declarations’ enshrined in the four Vedas are implied in this Gayatri mantra.

Choosing the right decision from the consciousness was later defined by Buddha. He taught that before any action ask yourself the following four questions and if the answer to any of the question is no, not to indulge in that actions. These four questions are:

  • Is it the truth?
  • Is it necessary?
  • Will the action bring happiness to you?
  • Will the action bring happiness to others?