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Dr K K Aggarwal

Top Characters of Mahabharata

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Top Characters of Mahabharata

To be in harmony with the body (five elements represented by Draupadi), one must acquire five qualities or in other terms live a focused life, full of strength and not being disturbed with loss or gain and finally working for the welfare of the society without having any partiality towards anyone.

  1. Balanced mind: Yudhishthir (“sthir” or balanced in “yudh” or disturbed state of mind)
  2. Focused vision (Arjuna)
  3. Using internal power or strength (Bhima)
  4. Not being partial or remaining neutral (Nakul)
  5. Working for the welfare of the society (Sahdev)

With this, one can kill 100 negative qualities that a person can have (the 100 Kauravs). The hundred negative qualities are acquired because of cunningness (Shakuni), not working with the eyes of the soul (Dhritarashtra) and keeping a blind eye to any wrong happening (Gandhari).

The main negative qualities are taking decisions in day–to–day life situations (Duryodhana: dusht in yudha or war) and choosing wrong choices as a ruler (dushasana: dusht and shasan).

The positive qualities once acquired will also win over other negative qualities like blind faith or undue attachments (Bhishma pitamaha); unrighteous loyalty (Dronacharya) and unrighteous ego (Karna).

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Top Characters of Mahabharata

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Top Characters of Mahabharata

To be in harmony with the body (five elements represented by Draupadi), one must acquire five qualities or in other terms live a focused life, full of strength and not being disturbed with loss or gain and finally working for the welfare of the society without having any partiality towards anyone.

• Balanced mind: Yudhishtir (“sthir” or balanced in “yudh” or disturbed state of mind)

• Focused vision (Arjuna)

• Using internal power or strength (Bhima)

• Not being partial or remaining neutral (Nakul)

• Working for the welfare of the society (Sahdev) With this, one can kill 100 negative qualities that a person can have (the 100 Kauravs). The hundred negative qualities are acquired because of cunningness (Shakuni), not working with the eyes of the soul (Dhritarashtra) and keeping a blind eye to any wrong happening (Gandhari). The main negative qualities are taking decisions in day–to–day life situations (Duryodhana: dusht in yudha or war) and choosing wrong choices as a ruler (dusshasana: dusht and shasan). The positive qualities once acquired will also win over other negative qualities like blind faith or undue attachments (Bhishma pitamaha); unrighteous loyalty (Dronacharya) and unrighteous ego (Karna).