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Dr K K Aggarwal

Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

In a survey conducted by Heart Care Foundation of India of 400 people from all walks of life, 90% of the people said that wishes of the dying person and dead body should be respected in the hospital setting. They said that doctors should be more compassionate and emphatic at the time of declaring a patient dead.

Unless people are expecting a death, death usually comes as a shock to the family members. It is expected that the relations may be in agony, pain and even anger. Every hospital should have a mourning room where the relatives should be made to sit, counseled and death declared.

After the death is declared, the treating doctors, nurses and hospital staff must sit with the patient’s relatives, counsel them, tell them about the sequence of events before death and also counsel them about how to handle the dead body. People also want to know the cause of death so that similar thing may not happen to another person in the family.

They also want to know if the body is infectious or not and what rituals should be avoided if the body is infectious. They also like to know about how to preserve the dead body till cremation.

They may also like to know whether a postmortem is required to know exact cause of death, which can help future family members of the family.

Negative Thoughts are Absence of Positive Thoughts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Negative Thoughts are Absence of Positive Thoughts

Darkness cannot be removed physically; it can only be removed by switching on the light or going into sunlight or lighting a fire. Similarly, negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts.

In Bhagavad Gita, it has been said that in the period of Uttarayana with longer days, the first half at full moon, in the presence of light or agni, more positive thoughts are acquired compared to in Dakshinayana, before Amavasya or no moon or in absence of light.

Bhagavad Gita also says that whatever you think the whole life, you think at the time of death and if the time at the time of death you have positive thoughts, you are likely to get Moksha.

That may be the reason why in Hindu mythology it is said that just before the death, we should light a diya or chant in front of agni (fire) so that dying person’s thoughts become positive.

In computer language, it is explained that when you open a file repeatedly, it becomes a priority file and appears in the search engine on priority as compared to other files.

Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

In a survey conducted by Heart Care Foundation of India of 400 people from all walks of life, 90% of the people wanted that wishes of the dying person and dead body should be respected in the hospital setting. They said that doctors should be more compassionate and emphatic at the time of declaring a patient dead.

Unless people are expecting a death, death usually comes as a shock to the family members. It is expected that the relations may be in agony, pain and even anger. Every hospital should have a mourning room where the relatives should be made to sit, counselled and death declared.

After the death is declared, the treating doctors, nurses and hospital staff must sit with the patient’s relatives, counsel them, tell them about the sequence of events before death and also counsel them about how to handle the dead body. People also want to know the cause of death so that similar thing may not happen to another person in the family.

They also want to know if the body is infectious or not and what rituals to be avoided if the body is infectious. They also like to know about how to preserve the dead body till cremation.

They may also like to know whether a postmortem is required to know exact cause of death, which can help future family members of the family.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

Darkness cannot be removed physically; it can only be removed by switching on the light or going into sunlight or lighting a fire. Similarly, negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts.

In Bhagavad Gita, it has been said that in the period of Uttarayana with longer days, the first half at full moon, in the presence of light or agni, more positive thoughts are acquired compared to in Dakshinayana, before Amavasya or no moon or in absence of light.

Bhagavad Gita also says that whatever you think the whole life, you think at the time of death and if the time at the time of death you have positive thoughts, you are likely to get Moksha. That may be the reason why in Hindu mythology it is said that just before the death, we should light a diya or chant in front of agni (fire) so that dying person’s thoughts become positive.

In computer language, it is explained that when you open a file repeatedly, it becomes a priority file and appears in the search engine on priority as compared to other files.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

I want to live after my death

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In my workshops, whenever I ask delegates as to how long they want to live, the answer I get from most of them is 60, 70 or 80 years. While answering they forget that they are only talking about the death of the physical body but what about the mental, social, intellectual and spiritual bodies.

It is well known that the soul never dies and so do your Sanskars and good work done. The aim of life should be that one should live even after the death of his or her physical body. It is your good Karmas, which keep your memories alive even after your physical death.

It is equally true that your bad Karmas too can make people remember you after death but that is not the purpose of life. We would like to be remembered as Rama and not like Ravana after death.

In Vedic language your present is decided by your past and your future is decided by your present. To improve your future you need to work positively in your present.

When you start working positively in your present moment, you will start neutralizing your bad karmas. It is like washing a dirty shirt, which will not become stain free in one washing. Only with repeated washings can it become stain free. Similarly washing away your bad karmas with good karmas will take time.

It is possible that even when one starts doing good Karmas, one may still suffer as the sum total of past karmas may not have been neutralized by that time.

For example, if a dacoit surrenders and wants to live a civilian life he may be pardoned to some extent but may still be jailed for some duration of time. In other word he may be pardoned from death sentence and given life sentence.

As per Bhagavad Gita, whatever your thoughts are at the time of death will decide the atmosphere you will get in your rebirth.

It also says that whatever will be your thoughts throughout your life will be your thoughts at the time of your death.

So do not expect that you can acquire positive thoughts at the time of death if you have been thinking negative throughout your life… The gist is to start doing good actions in the present.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Soul does not depart the body immediately after death

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Soul does not depart the body immediately after death

According to Prashna Upanishad, at the time of death, the Prana Vayu (life force and respiration) merges with Udana Vayu (brain stem reflexes) and leaves the body.

But this does not happen immediately after clinical death, defined as stoppage of heart and respiration. Medically the term used for clinically dead patients is sudden cardiac arrest.

As per modern medicine, in cardiac arrest, the brain does not die for the next 10 minutes and during this period, if the heart can be revived, life can be brought back.

The revival of patient during this period can be remembered by the formula of ten which is that within ten minutes of the stoppage of heart (cardiac arrest), if effective chest compressions are given for the next 10 minutes with a speed of 100 per min (10 x 10), 80% of the cardiac arrest victims can be revived.

This period can be much longer in hypothermia state. If the temperature of the body is low, the soul does not leave the body till the temperature is brought back to normal. Today, this property of soul is also used as therapeutic measure where patients who cannot be revived in the first 10 min of clinical death are put in a freezing chamber and artificial hypothermia is produced and these patients can then be transported to an advance cardiac centre where even after 24 hours resuscitation measure can be applied after re-warming the body. Many people have been revived even after 24 hours of cardiac arrest with such a technology.

There are instances in literature where a newborn with hypothermia was declared dead and got revived in the cremation ground when the heat of the atmosphere brought his temperature to normal and the pressure of the wood worked like cardiac massage.

This aspect of “life after death” is a contribution of the modern science to the Vedic science. Though in Vedic literature, it was a well-known phenomenon as Savitri brought life back into Satyavan even after his clinical death.

The take home message is that one should not declare a patient dead in the first 10 minutes give cardiac massage and try reviving him with chest compression cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Soul does not leave the body immediately after the death

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Soul does not leave the body immediately after the death

According to Prashna Upanishad, at the time of death, the Prana Vayu (life force and respiration) merges with Udana Vayu (brain stem reflexes) and leaves the body. But this does not happen immediately after clinical death, which is defined as stoppage of heart and respiration. Medically the term used for clinically dead patients is sudden cardiac arrest.

As per the modern medicine, in cardiac arrest, the brain does not die for the next 10 minutes and during this period, if the heart can be revived, life can be brought back.

The revival of patient during this period can be remembered by the ‘Formula of 10’: Within 10 minutes of the stoppage of heart (cardiac arrest), if effective chest compressions are given for the next ten minutes with a speed of 100 per minutes (10X10), 80% of the cardiac arrest victims can be revived.

This period can be much longer in hypothermia state. If the temperature of the body is low, the soul does not leave the body till the temperature is brought back to normal. Today, this property of soul is also used as therapeutic measure where patients who cannot be revived in the first 10 minutes of clinical death are put in a freezing chamber and artificial hypothermia is produced and these patients can then be transported to an advance cardiac centre where even after 24 hours, resuscitation measures can be applied after re-warming the body. Many people have been revived even after 24 hours of cardiac arrest with such a technology.

There are instances in literature where a newborn with hypothermia was declared dead but revived in the cremation ground when the environment heat brought the body temperature to normal and the pressure of the wood worked like cardiac massage.

This aspect of “life after death” is a contribution of the modern science to the Vedic science. Though in Vedic literature, it was well known phenomenon as Savitri brought life back into Satyavan even after his clinical death.

Take home message is that one should not declare a patient dead in the first 10 minutes; give cardiac massage and try reviving him with chest compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

 (Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

Darkness cannot be removed physically it can only be removed by switching light or going into sunlight or lighting fire. Similarly negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts. In Bhagavad Gita also it has been said that the period of Uttarayana with longer days the first half at full moon in the presence of light or agni one acquires more positive thoughts as compared in Dakshinayana before Amavasya or no moon or in absence of light. Bhagavad Gita also says that whatever you think the whole life you think at the time of death and if the time at the time of death you have positive thoughts you are likely to get Moksha. That may be the reason why in Hindu mythology it is said that just before the death we should light a diya or chant in front of agni fire so that dying person s thoughts become positive. In computer language it is explained that when you open a file repeatedly it becomes a priority file and comes in search engine on priority as compared to other files. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

Darkness cannot be removed physically it can only be removed by switching on the light or going into sunlight or lighting a fire. Similarly negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts. In Bhagavad Gita it has been said that in the period of Uttarayana with longer days the first half at full moon in the presence of light or agni one acquires more positive thoughts as compared to in Dakshinayana before Amavasya or no moon or in absence of light. Bhagavad Gita also says that whatever you think the whole life you think at the time of death and if the time at the time of death you have positive thoughts you are likely to get Moksha. That may be the reason why in Hindu mythology it is said that just before the death we should light a diya or chant in front of agni fire so that dying person s thoughts become positive. In computer language it is explained that when you open a file repeatedly it becomes a priority file and comes in search engine on priority as compared to other files. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

What is the importance of life force?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A physical body becomes useless once the life force is gone. The same body, which was lovable to everyone, becomes a liability after death. Everyone wants to dispose it as early as possible as keeping a dead body at home is considered a bad omen. During the transfer of dead body from one place to another nobody wants to keep the body in a vehicle other than a hearse van, meant to transport dead bodies. No family would be willing to carry the dead body of a person in a car in which the deceased person had been traveling or driving for years. Once you touch a dead body you are required to take a bath, for any reason, health or ritual, before you commence your daily routine. Within a matter of hours in absence of life force, the physical body starts disintegrating and in a matter of days, it shows signs of self-destruction and putrefaction. This vital force is nothing but the soul, atma, brahma, spirit or consciousness described in different Vedic texts. Adi Shankaracharya in his book Bhaja Govindam shloka 6 says: Yávat-pavano nivasati dehe Távat-pøcchati kuùalam gehe, Gatavati váyau dehápáye Bháryá bibhyati tasmin káye.(6) “Till the life force remains in the body, people come and enquire about your welfare. But, the moment the life force goes out, even your wife is afraid of coming anywhere near your body”. Life force can be equated to the network of information in computer, radio, television or mobile phone. All these gadgets without data are useless and are thrown away. This silent data retrievable by operational and application software represent the life force or soul of these electronic gadgets. Just as one does not give importance to a computer without data, one should not give importance to the physical body. It is the life force within the body which is respected and cared for and that is what real “I” or “We” are. All glories of the body are only until the life force remains in it. In Bhagavad-Gita, Lord Krishna in Chapter 2 (2.23) says about this life force or ataman “fire cannot burn it, weapon cannot cut it, water cannot wet it, air cannot dry it, it is immortal”. The most defined relationship in Vedic text is between husband and wife. The very fact even a wife after death does not want to touch the husband signifies the importance of life force. The life force has no dimensions: height, weight, color or image. It is immortal, omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent. The weight of a live and a dead body immediately after the death is the same. It is the same life force, which dwells in everybody and during life is modified by the action, memory and desire cycle. If one gets attached to any of the three, then one starts getting detached from the soul or the life force. People who are in touch with their life force all the time attain peace and happiness and die young in old age. Most Vedic mahavakyas talk about, that it is the same spirit, which dwells in everybody and hence every person in the society should be welcomed and treated with equal importance. Aham brahmasami, tatwam asi, vasudeva kutumbakam, etc. are a few of the examples. According to Adi Shankaracharya, one can achieve non-duality only by seeing God in everyone. Athithi-devo-bhava is also based on the same principle. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

Did all Gods suffer before death?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Most Gods and spiritual gurus had suffered in their last days. Lord Krishna had a nonhealing wound, Jesus Christ was crucified, Bhagwan Rajneesh had an infectious disease, Swami Chinmayanand had low functioning heart, Maharshi Mahesh Yogi had heart and pancreatic disease, Satya Sai Baba was put on a ventilator etc. When they were God–like personalities, why did they suffer in their last days? The answer to this comes from Vedic knowledge within the concept of rebirth. Vedanta says that the very fact that we are born means that in the last birth we did not attain moksha or liberation. In other words, this means that there were some sufferings yet to be faced. You are born to face those sufferings. When you face the last suffering, there are high chances that that suffering may be your last suffering before liberation. Most Gods or saints who died in a phase of suffering may mean that they did not attain liberation. A person who dies suddenly or unnaturally would mean that he would have to take rebirth to face more sufferings. According to me, terminal sufferings are good from spiritual point of view.

Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

In a survey conducted by Heart Care Foundation of India of 400 people from all walks of life, 90% of the people wanted that wishes of the dying person and dead body should be respected in the hospital setting. They said that doctors should be more compassionate and emphatic at the time of declaring a patient dead. Unless people are expecting a death, death usually comes as a shock to the family members. It is expected that the relations may be in agony, pain and even anger. Every hospital should have a mourning room where the relatives should be made to sit, counselled and death declared. After the death is declared, the treating doctors, nurses and hospital staff must sit with the patient’s relatives, counsel them, tell them about the sequence of events before death and also counsel them about how to handle the dead body. People also want to know the cause of death so that similar thing may not happen to another person in the family. They also want to know if the body is infectious or not and what rituals to be avoided if the body is infectious. They also like to know about how to preserve the dead body till cremation. They may also like to know whether a postmortem is required to know exact cause of death, which can help future family members of the family.

Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

Darkness cannot be removed physically; it can only be removed by switching on the light or going into sunlight or lighting a fire. Similarly, negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts. In Bhagavad Gita, it has been said that in the period of Uttarayana with longer days, the first half at full moon, in the presence of light or agni, more positive thoughts are acquired compared to in Dakshinayana, before Amavasya or no moon or in absence of light. Bhagavad Gita also says that whatever you think the whole life, you think at the time of death and if the time at the time of death you have positive thoughts, you are likely to get Moksha. That may be the reason why in Hindu mythology it is said that just before the death, we should light a diya or chant in front of agni (fire) so that dying person’s thoughts become positive. In computer language, it is explained that when you open a file repeatedly, it becomes a priority file and appears in the search engine on priority as compared to other files

Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

Darkness cannot be removed physically; it can only be removed by switching on the light or going from the dark into the sunlight or lighting a fire. Similarly, negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts. In Bhagavad Gita also it has been said that during Uttarayana with longer days, the first half at full moon, in the presence of light or agni, one acquires more positive thoughts as compared to Dakshinayana, before Amavasya or no moon or in absence of light. Bhagavad Gita also says that whatever you think the whole life, you think at the time of death and at the time of death you have positive thoughts, you are likely to get Moksha. This may be the reason why in Hindu mythology it is said that just before the death, we should light a diya or chant in front of agni (fire) so that the dying person’s thoughts become positive. In computer language, it is explained that when you open a file repeatedly, it becomes a priority file and comes in search engine on priority as compared to other files.

Can death be postponed?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Yes. If you read Vedic science, it is possible to postpone death. As per Chandoghya Upanishad, death is a process in which first Karma Indriyas die, then Gyan Indriyas die followed by mind, intellect, memory, ego, and then Prana vayu merges with Udana vayu, which then merges with Tejas and finally Tejas leaves to merge with the Sat. That means at every step it is possible to help the body. 1. At the level of Karma Indriyas, the immunity can be strengthened by providing adequate fat and oil based nutrition to the dying person. 2. Karma Indriyas, mind, intellect, memory and ego can be strengthened by giving non-fat based earthy food to the dying person that means maintaining full calories. 3. Prana Vayu can be strengthened by providing liquid hydration and with the assistance of ventilator as and when required. 4. At the level of Tejas, it is possible to postpone death by creating artificial therapeutic hypothermia in which the body temperature is brought down to less than 95, preferably to 89. 5. If the heart has stopped, it is possible to revive it by the CPR 10 technique which is based on the formula – within 10 minutes of death (earlier the better), for the next 10 minutes (longer the better), compress the center of the chest of the victim with a speed of 10×10=100 per minute.