Sub Logo

Dr K K Aggarwal

Tips to prevent deficiency of Vitamin B12

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Tips to prevent deficiency of Vitamin B12

Avoid consumption of alcohol. Consuming alcohol in excess leads to gastritis and damages the intestinal lining. This can further interfere with absorption of vitamin B12.

Quit smoking. It has been observed that serum vitamin B12 levels are usually lower in smokers.

Have supplements. Vegetarian food is deficient in vitamin B12. Therefore, it is important to take a B12-containing multivitamin. Other than this, include soy foods and foods fortified with vitamin B12 in your diet.

Include vitamin B6 in your diet. This will help in the absorption and storage of vitamin B12. Spinach, walnuts, poultry, avocados, and bananas are good sources of B6.

5 tips to reduce salt in your diet

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on 5 tips to reduce salt in your diet

  1. Make reading food labels a habit. Sodium content is always listed on food labels. Sodium content can vary from brand to brand, so compare and choose the lowest sodium product. Certain foods don’t taste particularly salty but are actually high in sodium, such as cottage cheese, so it’s critical to check labels.
  2. Stick to fresh meats, fruits and vegetables rather than their packaged counterparts, which tend to be higher in sodium.
  3. Avoid spices and seasonings that contain added sodium, for example garlic salt. Choose garlic powder instead.
  4. Many restaurants list the sodium content of their products on their websites, so do your homework before dining out. Also, you can request that your food be prepared without any added salt.
  5. Try to spread your sodium intake out throughout the day; it’s easier on your kidneys than eating lots of salt all at once.

5 tips to reduce salt in your diet

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on 5 tips to reduce salt in your diet

  1. Make reading food labels a habit.Sodium content is always listed on food labels. Sodium content can vary from brand to brand, so compare and choose the lowest sodium product. Certain foods do not taste particularly salty but are actually high in sodium, such as cottage cheese, so it is critical to check labels.
  2. Stick to fresh meats, fruits and vegetables rather than their packaged counterparts, which tend to be higher in sodium.
  3. Avoid spices and seasonings that contain added sodium, for example, garlic salt. Choose garlic powder instead.
  4. Many restaurants list the sodium content of their products on their websites, so do your homework before dining out. Also, you can request that your food be prepared without any added salt.
  5. Try to spread your sodium intake out throughout the day; it’s easier on your kidneys than eating lots of salt all at once.

Diet is linked to the diabetes epidemic

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Diet is linked to the diabetes epidemic

 

A study published in the journal Diabetes Care, highlights the importance of the whole diet rather than focusing on certain foods or food groups that might be beneficial.

A diet rich in whole grains, fruits and vegetables (leafy green), nuts and low–fat dairy may help people lower their risk of type 2 diabetes by 15% over 5 years than those who ate the lowest amounts of these foods.

In contrast, adults whose diets were high in red meat, high–fat dairy, refined grains like white bread plus beans and tomatoes, saw their diabetes risk go up by 18% as a group.

Type 2 diabetes is closely linked to obesity and it is well–known that maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise reduces the risk of developing the disease. Diet affects diabetes risk independent of a person’s weight.

Add fiber to the diet only slowly

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Add fiber to the diet only slowly

Fiber is a plant substance that is required for a healthy diet. Lots of fiber is needed each day to help reduce the risk of heart disease, improve digestion, prevent constipation and maintain a healthy body weight.

Fiber can be found in fruits, whole grains and vegetables. Most adults should eat at least 20 to 35 grams of fiber every day; though the doctors say most people only eat about half as much. It’s best to slowly increase the fiber in your diet instead of piling it on all at once. A sudden increase in fiber intake can cause abdominal discomfort.

Fiber intake should be at least 14 grams per 1000 calories daily; higher fiber intake may improve glycemic control. Saturated fat should be less than 7 percent of calories and there should be minimal trans fat. Total cholesterol should be less than 200 mg daily.

There is an average fall of 1.2/1.3 mmHg blood pressure with average 10 gram intake of fiber.

Certain soluble fibers (psyllium, pectin, wheat dextrin and oat products) reduce bad LDL cholesterol. Every gram increase in soluble fiber reduces LDL cholesterol by an average of 2.2 mg/dL. The message is incorporation of greater amounts of fiber, in which carbohydrate is derived from unprocessed whole foods.

Add fiber to the diet only slowly

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Add fiber to the diet only slowly

Fiber is a plant substance that is required for a healthy diet. Lots of fiber is needed each day to help reduce the risk of heart disease, improve digestion, prevent constipation and maintain a healthy body weight.

Fiber can be found in fruits, whole grains and vegetables. Most adults should eat at least 20 to 35 grams of fiber every day; though the doctors say most people only eat about half as much. It’s best to slowly increase the fiber in your diet instead of piling it on all at once. A sudden increase in fiber intake can cause abdominal discomfort.

Fiber intake should be at least 14 grams per 1000 calories daily; higher fiber intake may improve glycemic control. Saturated fat should be less than 7 percent of calories and there should be minimal trans fat. Total cholesterol should be less than 200 mg daily.

There is an average fall of 1.2/1.3 mmHg blood pressure with average 10 gram intake of fiber.

Certain soluble fibers (psyllium, pectin, wheat dextrin and oat products) reduce bad LDL cholesterol. Every gram increase in soluble fiber reduces LDL cholesterol by an average of 2.2 mg/dL. The message is incorporation of greater amounts of fiber, in which carbohydrate is derived from unprocessed whole foods.

Some health tips from HCFI

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Some health tips from HCFI

  1. Be aware of the products you use in your home and on your skin. For example, cleaning products with harsh chemicals.
  2. Eat healthy and include lots of fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet. They contain fibre and substances that can help in flushing toxins out of your system.
  3. Take steps to combat stress as this lowers your immune system function. Exercise, sleep well, and meditate. You can also opt for yoga to get rid of stress.
  4. Sleep well as it reduces cortisol produced by the body during stress. It also balances leptin, which determines how much food we eat. If our leptin is off balance, most likely the body will feel that it never gets enough food, which leads to overeating.
  5. Reduce or quit smoking and drinking.

Some tips from HCFI.

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Some tips from HCFI.

  1. Achieve and maintain a healthy weight for your height.
  2. Exercise regularly.
  3. Eat a diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
  4. Limit sodium intake to under 2,300 milligrams a day (one teaspoon of salt), and get plenty of potassium (at least 4,700 mg per day) from fruits and vegetables.
  5. Drink alcohol in moderation, if at all.
  6. Reduce stress.
  7. Monitor your blood pressure regularly, and work with your doctor to keep it in a healthy range.

HCFI tips for fasting

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on HCFI tips for fasting

  1. Plan your diet especially if you have medical conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Do not skip your medication schedule. Keep a healthy snack handy for those cravings.
  2. Keep yourself hydrated by drinking water, coconut water, green tea, buttermilk, and lime juice. Avoid aerated drinks.
  3. Avoid gorging on salty ‘vrat snacks’. Eat something that is boiled or roasted instead.
  4. Use rock salt in your food instead of usual salt as it helps in better mineral absorption. It is also beneficial for those who have high or low blood pressure.
  5. Eat lighter meals as these can aid digestion.
  6. For dessert, you can try eating dates or fruit yogurt. Also, add honey instead of sugar.
  7. Eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Slowly add fiber to diet

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Slowly add fiber to diet

Fiber is a plant substance that is required for a healthy diet. Lots of fiber is needed each day to help reduce the risk of heart disease, improve digestion, prevent constipation and maintain a healthy body weight. Fiber can be found in fruits, whole grains and vegetables. Most adults should eat at least 20 to 35 grams of fiber every day; though the doctors say most people only eat about half as much. It’s best to slowly increase the fiber in your diet instead of piling it on all at once. A sudden increase in fiber intake can cause abdominal discomfort. Fiber intake should be at least 14 grams per 1000 calories daily; higher fiber intake may improve glycemic control. Saturated fat should be less than 7 percent of calories and there should be minimal trans fat. Total cholesterol should be less than 200 mg daily. There is an average fall of 1.2/1.3 mmHg blood pressure with average 10 gram intake of fiber. Certain soluble fibers (psyllium, pectin, wheat dextrin and oat products) reduce bad LDL cholesterol. Every gram increase in soluble fiber reduces LDL cholesterol by an average of 2.2 mg/dL. The message is incorporation of greater amounts of fiber, in which carbohydrate is derived from unprocessed whole foods.

5 ways to boost bone strength early

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on 5 ways to boost bone strength early

1. Monitor your diet. Get enough calcium and vitamin D ideally through the foods you eat. Although dairy products may be the richest sources of calcium a growing number of foods such as orange juice are calcium fortified. Fruits vegetables and grains provide other minerals crucial to bone health such as magnesium and phosphorus. 2. Maintain a reasonable weight. This is particularly important for women. Menstrual periods often stop in women who are underweight due to a poor diet or excessive exercise and that usually means that estrogen levels are too low to support bone growth. 3. Don t smoke and limit alcohol intake. Smoking and too much alcohol both decrease bone mass. 4. Make sure your workouts include weight bearing exercises. Regular weight bearing exercise like walking dancing or step aerobics can protect your bones. Also include strength training as part of your exercise routine. 5. Talk with your doctor about your risk factors. Certain medical conditions like celiac disease and some medications steroids and others can increase the chances that you will develop osteoporosis. It s important to talk with your doctor to develop a prevention strategy that accounts for these factors.

Lifestyle changes should start in childhood

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Lifestyle changes should start in childhood

The seeds of heart blockages are born while a person is in his adolescence or childhood. Prevention, therefore, must start right at that age.
The doctors said that heart attack cannot be given or accepted as a Gift. It takes minimum 15 years to live a lifestyle against the laws of nature to develop early blockages. Heart disease, therefore, is reversible and gives you enough time to reverse. They also said that in diet one should adopt the principle of moderations and variety and include all seven colours and six tastes in their diet.
Traditional dances are better than western dance as classical traditional dance is a mix of yoga, meditation, relaxation and exercise.

Diet is linked to the diabetes epidemic

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Diet is linked to the diabetes epidemic

A study published in the journal Diabetes Care, has highlighted the importance of the whole diet rather than focusing on certain foods or food groups that might be beneficial. A diet rich in whole grains, fruits and vegetables (leafy green), nuts and low-fat dairy may help people lower their risk of type 2 diabetes by 15% over 5 years than those who ate the lowest amounts of these foods. Also, a diet which contains high amounts of red meat, high-fat dairy and refined grains like white bread may boost the odds of diabetes development by 18%. Type 2 diabetes is closely linked to obesity and it is well-known that maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise reduces the risk of developing the disease. Diet affects diabetes risk independent of a person’s weight.

How safe are anti-obesity drugs?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on How safe are anti-obesity drugs?

Obesity is a major health problem. The long–term success rate is low of diet and physical activity. Therefore, antiobesity drugs are of great interest, especially when lifestyle modification has failed. As obesity is not an immediate life–threatening disease, these drugs are required to be safe. Drugs developed so far have limited efficacies and considerable adverse effects affecting tolerability and safety. Therefore, most antiobesity drugs have been withdrawn

. • Fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine were withdrawn because of the potential damage to heart valves.

• Sibutramine was associated with an increase in major adverse cardiovascular events in the Sibutramine Cardiovascular Outcomes (SCOUT) trial and it was withdrawn from the market in 2010.

• Rimonabant was withdrawn because of significant psychiatric adverse effects.

• Orlistat was approved for long–term treatment of obesity, but many patients cannot tolerate its gastrointestinal side effects.

• Phentermine and diethylpropion can only be used for less than 12 weeks because the long–term safety of these drugs is unknown.

• Ephedrine and caffeine are natural substances but the effects on weight reduction are modest.

• Recently lorcaserin and topiramate plus phentermine have been approved for the treatment of obesity but long–term safety data are lacking. (Ther Adv in Drug Safe 2013;4(4):171–181)

5 tips to reduce salt in your diet

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on 5 tips to reduce salt in your diet

1. Make reading food labels a habit. Sodium content is always listed on food labels. Sodium content can vary from brand to brand, so compare and choose the lowest sodium product. Certain foods do not taste particularly salty but are actually high in sodium, such as cottage cheese, so it is critical to check labels.

2. Stick to fresh meats, fruits and vegetables rather than their packaged counterparts, which tend to be higher in sodium.

3. Avoid spices and seasonings that contain added sodium, for example, garlic salt. Choose garlic powder instead.

4. Many restaurants list the sodium content of their products on their websites, so do your homework before dining out. Also, you can request that your food be prepared without any added salt.

5. Try to spread your sodium intake out throughout the day; it’s easier on your kidneys than eating lots of salt all at once.