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Dr K K Aggarwal

Food poisoning with rice dishes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Staph and Bacillus cereus can cause acute food poisoning within 6 hours of ingestion of food. B. cereus is likely when rice is the culprit.

  • B. cereus is able to persist in food processing environments due to its ability to survive at extreme temperatures as well as its ability to form biofilms and spores.
  • B. cereus has been recovered from a wide range of foods, including rice, dairy products, spices, bean sprouts and other vegetables.
  • Fried rice is an important cause of emetic-type food poisoning associated with B. cereus.
  • The organism is frequently present in uncooked rice, and heat-resistant spores may survive cooking.
  • Cooked rice, subsequently at room temperature, can allow vegetative forms to multiply. The heat-stable toxin that is produced can survive brief heating such as stir frying.
  • Two distinct types of toxin-mediated food poisoning are caused by B. cereus, characterized by either diarrhea or vomiting, depending on which toxin is involved. The diarrheal toxin is produced by vegetative cells in the small intestine after ingestion of either bacilli or spores. The emetic toxin is ingested directly from contaminated food. Both toxins cause disease within 24 hours of ingestion.
  • The emetic syndrome is caused by direct ingestion of the toxin.
  • The number of viable spores and vegetative bacteria that produce diarrheal toxin is reduced by heating, although spores associated with emetic toxin are capable of surviving heat processing.
  • Cereulide is heat stable and resistant to gastric conditions.
  • The ingested toxin itself may therefore cause disease despite sufficient heating to kill B. cereus.
  • The emetic syndrome is characterized by abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting. Diarrhea also occurs in about one-third of individuals. Symptom onset is usually within one to five hours of ingestion, but it can also occur within half an hour and up to six hours after ingestion of contaminated food.
  • Symptoms usually resolve in 6 to 24 hours.
  • Rice-based dishes, in particular, have been implicated in emetic toxin-mediated disease, usually as a result of cooling fried rice dishes overnight at room temperature followed by reheating the next day.
  • The infective dose of cereulide required to cause symptoms is 8 to 10 micrograms per kilogram of body weight.

Tips to cope with food poisoning

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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An estimated 600 million cases of food-borne diseases occur annually worldwide. This translates into 1 in 10 people falling ill after eating contaminated food. Food-borne illnesses or food poisoning can be severely debilitating; hence, access to sufficient amounts of safe and nutritious food is therefore key to sustaining life and promoting good health.

Food poisoning usually occurs after eating food contaminated with bacteria or their toxins. Virus and parasites can also cause food poisoning.

Food poisoning due to preformed toxins vs live organisms: Food poisoning due to preformed toxins presents within 6 hours and the predominant symptom is vomiting, whereas food poisoning due to live organisms presents after 6 hours and the predominant symptom is diarrhea.

Symptoms of food poisoning include abdominal pain, nausea, headache, fatigue, vomiting and diarrhea. Symptoms may appear several hours to several days after eating tainted food. Severe dehydration may result due to vomiting and diarrhea.

Children, the elderly, immunocompromised people, pregnant women are particularly at risk of developing food poisoning.

Tips to cope with food poisoning

  • Let your stomach settle. Stop eating and drinking for a few hours.
  • Try sucking on ice chips or taking small sips of water. If your urine is clear and not dark, this means the body is hydrated enough.
  • Ease back into eating. Gradually begin to eat bland, low-fat, easy-to-digest foods, such as crackers, toast, bananas and rice. Stop eating if your nausea returns.
  • Avoid certain foods and substances until you’re feeling better. These include dairy products, caffeine, alcohol, nicotine, and fatty or highly seasoned foods.
  • Take adequate rest. The illness and dehydration can weaken and tire you.

Avoid food poisoning by thorough washing and proper cooking

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Thorough washing and proper cooking of fruits and vegetables can eliminate most bacteria that cause food poisoning.

Food borne illnesses or food poisoning usually occurs due to eating food that is contaminated withbacteria or their toxins.

Virus and parasites can also be cause food poisoning.

People have known for long that raw meat, poultry and eggs can also harbor diseases causing microbes.

But in recent years most outbreaks of food borne illnesses have been due to fresh fruits and vegetables.

Food poisoning can cause abdominal pain, nausea, headache, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration.

Symptoms may appear several hours to several days after eating tainted food.

For example, Salmonella bacteria will cause illness 12 hours to 3 days after ingestion lasting about 4-7 days.

The most common way to treat food poisoning is to drink plenty of fluids.

The sickness usually subsides within a few days.

Food poisoning with rice dishes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Food poisoning with rice dishes

Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus can cause acute food poisoning within 6 hours of ingestion of food. B. cereus is likely when rice is the culprit.

B. cereus is able to persist in food processing environments due to its ability to survive at extreme temperatures as well as its ability to form biofilms and spores.

B. cereus has been recovered from a wide range of foods, including rice, dairy products, spices, bean sprouts and other vegetables.

Fried rice is an important cause of emetic–type food poisoning associated with B. cereus.

The organism is frequently present in uncooked rice, and heat–resistant spores may survive cooking.

Cooked rice subsequently at room temperature can allow vegetative forms to multiply, and the heat-stable toxin that is produced can survive brief heating such as stir frying

Two distinct types of toxin-mediated food poisoning are caused by B. cereus, characterized by either diarrhea or vomiting, depending on which toxin is involved. The diarrheal toxin is produced by vegetative cells in the small intestine after ingestion of either bacilli or spores. The emetic toxin is ingested directly from contaminated food. Both toxins cause disease within 24 hours of ingestion.

The emetic syndrome is caused by direct ingestion of the toxin.

The number of viable spores and vegetative bacteria that produce diarrheal toxin is reduced by heating, although spores associated with emetic toxin are capable of surviving heat processing.

Cereulide is heat stable and resistant to gastric conditions.

The ingested toxin itself may therefore cause disease despite sufficient heating to kill B. cereus.

The emetic syndrome is characterized by abdominal cramps, nausea, and vomiting. Diarrhea also occurs in about one–third of individuals. Symptom onset is usually within 1 to 5 hours of ingestion, but it can also occur within half an hour and up to six hours after ingestion of contaminated food.

Symptoms usually resolve in 6 to 24 hours.

Rice–based dishes have been implicated in emetic toxin mediated disease, usually as a result of cooling fried rice dishes overnight at room temperature followed by reheating the next day.

The infective dose of cereulide required to cause symptoms is 8 to 10 micrograms per kilogram of body weight.

Avoid Food Poisoning by thorough washing and proper cooking

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Avoid Food Poisoning by thorough washing and proper cooking

Thorough washing and proper cooking of fruits and vegetables can eliminate most bacteria that cause food poisoning.

Food-borne illnesses or food poisoning usually occurs due to eating food that is contaminated with bacteria or their toxins. Virus and parasites can also be cause food poisoning. People have known for long that raw meat, poultry and eggs can also harbor diseases causing microbes. But in recent years most outbreaks of food borne illnesses have been due to fresh fruits and vegetables.

Food poisoning can cause abdominal pain, nausea, headache, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration. Symptoms may appear several hours to several days after eating tainted food. For example, Salmonella bacteria will cause illness 12 hours to 3 days after ingestion lasting about 4-7 days.

The most common way to treat food poisoning is to drink plenty of fluids. The sickness usually subsides within a few days.

Avoid food poisoning by thorough washing and proper cooking

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Avoid food poisoning by thorough washing and proper cooking

Thorough washing and proper cooking of fruits and vegetables can eliminate most bacteria that cause food poisoning.
Food-borne illnesses or food poisoning usually occurs due to eating food that is contaminated with bacteria or their toxins.
Virus and parasites can also be cause food poisoning. People have known for long that raw meat, poultry and eggs can also harbor diseases causing microbes. But in recent years most outbreaks of food borne illnesses have been due to fresh fruits and vegetables.
Food poisoning can cause abdominal pain, nausea, headache, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration. Symptoms may appear several hours to several days after eating tainted food. For example, Salmonella bacteria will cause illness 12 hours to 3 days after ingestion lasting about 4-7 days.
The most common way to treat food poisoning is to drink plenty of fluids. The sickness usually subsides within a few days.

Food poisoning with rice dishes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Food poisoning with rice dishes

Staph and Bacillus cereus can cause acute food poisoning within 6 hours of ingestion of food. B. cereus is likely when rice is the culprit.

• B. cereus is able to persist in food processing environments due to its ability to survive at extreme temperatures as well as its ability to form biofilms and spores.

• B. cereus has been recovered from a wide range of foods, including rice, dairy products, spices, bean sprouts and other vegetables.

• Fried rice is an important cause of emetic–type food poisoning associated with B. cereus.

• The organism is frequently present in uncooked rice, and heat–resistant spores may survive cooking.

• Cooked rice subsequently at room temperature can allow vegetative forms to multiply, and the heat-stable toxin that is produced can survive brief heating such as stir frying.

• Two distinct types of toxin-mediated food poisoning are caused by B. cereus, characterized by either diarrhea or vomiting, depending on which toxin is involved. The diarrheal toxin is produced by vegetative cells in the small intestine after ingestion of either bacilli or spores. The emetic toxin is ingested directly from contaminated food. Both toxins cause disease within 24 hours of ingestion.

• The emetic syndrome is caused by direct ingestion of the toxin.

• The number of viable spores and vegetative bacteria that produce diarrheal toxin is reduced by heating, although spores associated with emetic toxin are capable of surviving heat processing.

• Cereulide is heat stable and resistant to gastric conditions.

• The ingested toxin itself may therefore cause disease despite sufficient heating to kill B. cereus.

• The emetic syndrome is characterized by abdominal cramps, nausea, and vomiting. Diarrhea also occurs in about one–third of individuals. Symptom onset is usually within 1 to 5 hours of ingestion, but it can also occur within half an hour and up to six hours after ingestion of contaminated food.

• Symptoms usually resolve in 6 to 24 hours.

• Rice–based dishes in particular have been implicated in emetic toxin mediated disease, usually as a result of cooling fried rice dishes overnight at room temperature followed by reheating the next day.

• The infective dose of cereulide required to cause symptoms is 8 to 10 micrograms per kilogram of body weight.

Food poisoning with rice dishes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Food poisoning with rice dishes

Staph and Bacillus cereus can cause acute food poisoning within 6 hours of ingestion of food. B. cereus is likely when rice is the culprit.

  • B. cereus is able to persist in food processing environments due to its ability to survive at extreme temperatures as well as its ability to form biofilms and spores.
  • B. cereus has been recovered from a wide range of foods, including rice, dairy products, spices, bean sprouts and other vegetables.
  • Fried rice is an important cause of emetic–type food poisoning associated with B. cereus.
  • The organism is frequently present in uncooked rice, and heat–resistant spores may survive cooking.
  • Cooked rice subsequently at room temperature can allow vegetative forms to multiply, and the heat-stable toxin that is produced can survive brief heating such as stir frying
  • Two distinct types of toxin-mediated food poisoning are caused by B. cereus, characterized by either diarrhea or vomiting, depending on which toxin is involved. The diarrheal toxin is produced by vegetative cells in the small intestine after ingestion of either bacilli or spores. The emetic toxin is ingested directly from contaminated food. Both toxins cause disease within 24 hours of ingestion.
  • The emetic syndrome is caused by direct ingestion of the toxin.
  • The number of viable spores and vegetative bacteria that produce diarrheal toxin is reduced by heating, although spores associated with emetic toxin are capable of surviving heat processing.
  • Cereulide is heat stable and resistant to gastric conditions.
  • The ingested toxin itself may therefore cause disease despite sufficient heating to kill B. cereus.
  • The emetic syndrome is characterized by abdominal cramps, nausea, and vomiting. Diarrhea also occurs in about one–third of individuals. Symptom onset is usually within 1 to 5 hours of ingestion, but it can also occur within half an hour and up to six hours after ingestion of contaminated food.
  • Symptoms usually resolve in 6 to 24 hours.
  • Rice–based dishes in particular have been implicated in emetic toxin mediated disease, usually as a result of cooling fried rice dishes overnight at room temperature followed by reheating the next day.
  • The infective dose of cereulide required to cause symptoms is 8 to 10 micrograms per kilogram of body weight.

Food poisoning with rice dishes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Food poisoning with rice dishes

Staph and Bacillus cereus can cause acute food poisoning within 6 hours of ingestion of food. B. cereus is likely when rice is the culprit

  • B. cereus is able to persist in food processing environments due to its ability to survive at extreme temperatures as well as its ability to form biofilms and spores.
  • B. cereus has been recovered from a wide range of foods, including rice, dairy products, spices, bean sprouts and other vegetables.
  • Fried rice is an important cause of emetic–type food poisoning associated with B. cereus
  • The organism is frequently present in uncooked rice, and heat–resistant spores may survive cooking.
  • Cooked rice subsequently at room temperature can allow vegetative forms to multiply, and the heat–stable toxin that is produced can survive brief heating such as stir frying
  • Two distinct types of toxin–mediated food poisoning are caused by B. cereus, characterized by either diarrhea or vomiting, depending on which toxin is involved. The diarrheal toxin is produced by vegetative cells in the small intestine after ingestion of either bacilli or spores. The emetic toxin is ingested directly from contaminated food. Both toxins cause disease within 24 hours of ingestion.
  • The emetic syndrome is caused by direct ingestion of the toxin.
  • The number of viable spores and vegetative bacteria that produce diarrheal toxin is reduced by heating, although spores associated with emetic toxin are capable of surviving heat processing.
  • Cereulide is heat stable and resistant to gastric conditions.
  • The ingested toxin itself may therefore cause disease despite sufficient heating to kill
    B. cereus.
  • The emetic syndrome is characterized by abdominal cramps, nausea, and vomiting. Diarrhea also occurs in about one–third of individuals. Symptom onset is usually within 1 to 5 hours of ingestion, but it can also occur within half an hour and up to six hours after ingestion of contaminated food.
  • Symptoms usually resolve in 6 to 24 hours.
  • Rice-based dishes in particular have been implicated in emetic toxin mediated disease, usually as a result of cooling fried rice dishes overnight at room temperature followed by reheating the next day.
  • The infective dose of cereulide required to cause symptoms is 8 to 10 mcg per kg of body weight.

Food poisoning with rice dishes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Food poisoning with rice dishes

Staph and Bacillus cereus can cause acute food poisoning within 6 hours of ingestion of food. B. cereus is likely when rice is the culprit

  • B. cereus is able to persist in food processing environments due to its ability to survive at extreme temperatures as well as its ability to form biofilms and spores.
  • B. cereus has been recovered from a wide range of foods, including rice, dairy products, spices, bean sprouts and other vegetables.
  • Fried rice is an important cause of emetic–type food poisoning associated with B. cereus
  • The organism is frequently present in uncooked rice, and heat–resistant spores may survive cooking.
  • Cooked rice subsequently at room temperature can allow vegetative forms to multiply, and the heat–stable toxin that is produced can survive brief heating such as stir frying
  • Two distinct types of toxin–mediated food poisoning are caused by B. cereus, characterized by either diarrhea or vomiting, depending on which toxin is involved. The diarrheal toxin is produced by vegetative cells in the small intestine after ingestion of either bacilli or spores. The emetic toxin is ingested directly from contaminated food. Both toxins cause disease within 24 hours of ingestion.
  • The emetic syndrome is caused by direct ingestion of the toxin.
  • The number of viable spores and vegetative bacteria that produce diarrheal toxin is reduced by heating, although spores associated with emetic toxin are capable of surviving heat processing.
  • Cereulide is heat stable and resistant to gastric conditions.
  • The ingested toxin itself may therefore cause disease despite sufficient heating to kill B cereus.
  • The emetic syndrome is characterized by abdominal cramps, nausea, and vomiting. Diarrhea also occurs in about one-third of individuals. Symptom onset is usually within one to five hours of ingestion, but it can also occur within half an hour and up to six hours after ingestion of contaminated food.
  • Symptoms usually resolve in 6 to 24 hours.
  • Rice–based dishes in particular have been implicated in emetic toxin mediated disease, usually as a result of cooling fried rice dishes overnight at room temperature followed by reheating the next day.
  • The infective dose of cereulide required to cause symptoms is 8 to 10 micrograms per kilogram of body weight.

Food poisoning with rice dishes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Food poisoning with rice dishes

Staph and Bacillus cereus can cause acute food poisoning within 6 hours of ingestion of food. B. cereus is likely when rice is the culprit.

  • B. cereus is able to persist in food processing environments due to its ability to survive at extreme temperatures as well as its ability to form biofilms and spores.
  • B. cereus has been recovered from a wide range of foods, including rice, dairy products, spices, bean sprouts and other vegetables.
  • Fried rice is an important cause of emetic–type food poisoning associated with B. cereus.
  • The organism is frequently present in uncooked rice, and heat–resistant spores may survive cooking.
  • Cooked rice subsequently at room temperature can allow vegetative forms to multiply, and the heat-stable toxin that is produced can survive brief heating such as stir frying
  • Two distinct types of toxin-mediated food poisoning are caused by B. cereus, characterized by either diarrhea or vomiting, depending on which toxin is involved. The diarrheal toxin is produced by vegetative cells in the small intestine after ingestion of either bacilli or spores. The emetic toxin is ingested directly from contaminated food. Both toxins cause disease within 24 hours of ingestion.
  • The emetic syndrome is caused by direct ingestion of the toxin.
  • The number of viable spores and vegetative bacteria that produce diarrheal toxin is reduced by heating, although spores associated with emetic toxin are capable of surviving heat processing.
  • Cereulide is heat stable and resistant to gastric conditions.
  • The ingested toxin itself may therefore cause disease despite sufficient heating to kill B. cereus.
  • The emetic syndrome is characterized by abdominal cramps, nausea, and vomiting. Diarrhea also occurs in about one–third of individuals. Symptom onset is usually within 1 to 5 hours of ingestion, but it can also occur within half an hour and up to six hours after ingestion of contaminated food.
  • Symptoms usually resolve in 6 to 24 hours.
  • Rice–based dishes in particular have been implicated in emetic toxin mediated disease, usually as a result of cooling fried rice dishes overnight at room temperature followed by reheating the next day.
  • The infective dose of cereulide required to cause symptoms is 8 to 10 micrograms per kilogram of body weight.

Dead Rat in Hostel Meal, Kids Take Ill

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Some children took severely ill when a dead rat was allegedly found in dinner served at a government residential school in Hardauli village in Banda district on Sunday. The students started vomiting after which a team of government doctors was rushed to the school. The students are feeling better now reports TOI.

In this case it looks like the people vomited after they came to know about the rat and not because of the rat poisoning. If the rat is boiled and cooked in the food it cannot cause poisoning. If a dead rat is put in the boiled food again it is unlikely to cause poisoning. In any way if it was poisoning it was staph bacteria poisoning, which is self-limiting and causes no death.

One can classify food poisoning depending on the onset of symptoms as follows:

  • Rapid symptoms within 6-12 hours: are due to organisms that make a toxin in the food before the food is consumed. Symptom is predominantly vomiting. Examples are Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus emetic toxin and botulism.
  • Symptoms after 24 hours: are due to pathogens that make toxin once they have been ingested. They mainly cause diarrhea that may be watery (Vibrio cholerae or E. coli) or bloody (Shiga toxin-producing E. coli).
  • Symptoms after variable time: are due to microbes that cause pathology by either damaging the epithelial cell surface or by actually invading across the intestinal epithelial cell barrier. They can produce a wide spectrum of clinical presentations from watery diarrhea (Cryptosporidium parvum, enteric viruses) to inflammatory diarrhea (Salmonella, Campylobacter, Shigella) or systemic disease (L. monocytogenes).

Food poisoning can also be classified depending on the type of symptoms vomiting or diarrhea.  A sudden onset of nausea and vomiting is likely due to the ingestion of a preformed toxin, such as S. aureus enterotoxin or B. cereus emetic toxin, or a chemical irritant. There is no risk of person-to-person spread.

When the poisoning presents with diarrhea, the organisms are V. cholerae, Clostridium perfringens, enterotoxigenic E. coli, B. cereus, rotavirus, astroviruses, enteric adenoviruses and Noroviruses, and the parasitic organisms, Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis.

There are clinical clues that should increase suspicion that a food-borne microbe is causing inflammatory diarrhea. Such symptoms and signs include: Passage of diarrhea with blood or mucus; presence of severe abdominal pain and occurrence of fever. The most likely pathogens in patients with inflammatory diarrhea are Salmonella or Campylobacter.