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Dr K K Aggarwal

Diet and Aging: Gaining a Nutritional Edge

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Diet and Aging: Gaining a Nutritional Edge

Choose fruits and vegetables wisely

  • Eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.
  • When filling your plate with fruits and vegetables, choose from a full color palette.
  • For even more health benefits, aim for nine servings a day. To get there, choose vegetable soups and vegetable or fruit salads. Sprinkle fruit on breakfast cereal, and select it for snacks or as a sweet end note after meals.

Choose fats wisely

  • Whenever possible, use monounsaturated and polyunsaturated oils. Avoid trans fats entirely. Limit saturated fats to less than 7% of daily calories and total fat to 20% to 30% of daily calories.
  • If you don’t have coronary artery disease, the American Heart Association recommends eating foods rich in omega–3 fatty acids, such as salmon, trout, or mackerel, twice weekly. If you have documented coronary artery disease, consume roughly 1 gram a day of EPA or DHA from oily fish and supplements if your doctor advises this.

Choose carbohydrates wisely

  • Choose whole–grain foods over those made with refined grains, such as white bread. Look beyond popular choices like whole oats and brown rice to lesser–known whole grains like barley, bulgur, kasha and quinoa. Limit your intake of white potatoes.

Choosing protein wisely

  • Emphasize plant sources of protein, such as beans, nuts, and grains, to help you bypass unhealthy fats predominant in animal sources. Enjoying a wide variety of vegetables and eating beans and grains helps you get a full complement of amino acids over the course of a week. Shy away from protein sources high in saturated fat. Favor fish and well–trimmed poultry. If you do eat beef, pick lean cuts.
  • Don’t char or overcook meat, poultry, or fish, it causes a buildup of carcinogens. Cutting off fat, which causes flames to flare on the grill, can help avoid charring; try gently sautéing, steaming, or braising these foods in liquid instead. Grilling vegetables is safe, however.

Diet and Aging: Gaining a Nutritional Edge

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Diet and Aging: Gaining a Nutritional Edge

Choose fruits and vegetables wisely

  • Get at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.
  • When filling your plate with fruits and vegetables, choose from a full color palette.
  • For even more health benefits, aim for nine servings a day. To get there, choose vegetable soups and vegetable or fruit salads. Sprinkle fruit on breakfast cereal, and select it for snacks or as a sweet end note after meals.

Choose fats wisely

  • Whenever possible, use monounsaturated and polyunsaturated oils. Avoid trans fats entirely. Limit saturated fats to less than 7% of daily calories and total fat to 20% to 30% of daily calories.
  • If you don’t have coronary artery disease, the American Heart Association recommends eating foods rich in omega–3 fatty acids, such as salmon, trout, or mackerel, twice weekly. If you have documented coronary artery disease, consume roughly 1 gram a day of EPA or DHA from oily fish and supplements if your doctor advises this.

Choose carbohydrates wisely

  • Choose whole–grain foods over those made with refined grains, such as white bread. Look beyond popular choices like whole oats and brown rice to lesser–known whole grains like barley, bulgur, kasha, and quinoa. Limit your intake of white potatoes.

Choosing proteins wisely

  • Emphasize plant sources of protein, such as beans, nuts, and grains, to help you bypass unhealthy fats predominant in animal sources. Enjoying a wide variety of vegetables and eating beans and grains helps you get a full complement of amino acids over the course of a week. Shy away from protein sources high in saturated fat. Favor fish and well–trimmed poultry. If you do eat beef, pick lean cuts.
  • Don’t char or overcook meat, poultry, or fish — it causes a buildup of carcinogens. Cutting off fat, which causes flames to flare on the grill, can help avoid charring; try gently sautéing, steaming, or braising these foods in liquid instead. Grilling vegetables is safe, however.

Diet and Aging: Gaining a Nutritional Edge

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Diet and Aging: Gaining a Nutritional Edge

Choose fruits and vegetables wisely

  • Get at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.
  • When filling your plate with fruits and vegetables, choose from a full color palette.
  • For even more health benefits, aim for nine servings a day. To get there, choose vegetable soups and vegetable or fruit salads. Sprinkle fruit on breakfast cereal, and select it for snacks or as a sweet end note after meals.

Choose fats wisely

  • Whenever possible, use monounsaturated and polyunsaturated oils. Avoid trans fats entirely. Limit saturated fats to less than 7% of daily calories and total fat to 20% to 30% of daily calories.
  • If you don’t have coronary artery disease, the American Heart Association recommends eating foods rich in omega–3 fatty acids, such as salmon, trout, or mackerel, twice weekly. If you have documented coronary artery disease, consume roughly 1 gram a day of EPA or DHA from oily fish and supplements if your doctor advises this.

Choose carbohydrates wisely

  • Choose whole–grain foods over those made with refined grains, such as white bread. Look beyond popular choices like whole oats and brown rice to lesser–known whole grains like barley, bulgur, kasha, and quinoa. Limit your intake of white potatoes.

Choosing protein wisely

  • Emphasize plant sources of protein, such as beans, nuts, and grains, to help you bypass unhealthy fats predominant in animal sources. Enjoying a wide variety of vegetables and eating beans and grains helps you get a full complement of amino acids over the course of a week. Shy away from protein sources high in saturated fat. Favor fish and well–trimmed poultry. If you do eat beef, pick lean cuts.
  • Don’t char or overcook meat, poultry, or fish — it causes a buildup of carcinogens. Cutting off fat, which causes flames to flare on the grill, can help avoid charring; try gently sautéing, steaming, or braising these foods in liquid instead. Grilling vegetables is safe, however.

Gaining weight losing strength versus losing weight gaining strength

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Gaining weight losing strength versus losing weight gaining strength

When we gain weight, we must acquire more strength and when we lose weight, we must lose the strength. This is a fundamental principle.

If we gain weight and feel weak, it is a disease and when we lose weight and gain strength, we are recovering from the disease. One is not supposed to gain more than 5kg of weight after the age of 20 years. Any weight gain after that will only be due to accumulation of fat, which leads to insulin resistance.

Insulin resistance does not allow food to convert into energy. In the state of insulin resistance, whatever you eat is converted into fat. As it is not converted into energy so you feel weak. When you reduce insulin resistance by drugs or walking, the metabolism becomes normal and whatever you eat gets converted into energy and you start gaining strength.

 

Gaining Weight Losing Strength Versus Losing Weight Gaining Strength

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Gaining Weight Losing Strength Versus Losing Weight Gaining Strength

When we gain weight, we must acquire more strength and when we lose weight, we must lose the strength. This is a fundamental medical principle.

If we gain weight and feel week, it is a disease and when we lose weight and gain strength, we are recovering from the disease. One is not supposed to gain more than 5kg of weight after the age of 20 years. Any weight gain after that will only be due to accumulation of fat which leads to insulin resistance.

Insulin resistance does not allow food to convert into energy. In the state of insulin resistance, whatever you eat, it is converted into fat. As it is not converted into energy and you feel week. When you reduce insulin resistance by drugs or walking the metabolism becomes normal and whatever you eat gets converted into energy and you start gaining strength

Gaining weight losing strength versus losing weight gaining strength

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Gaining weight losing strength versus losing weight gaining strength

When we gain weight, we must acquire more strength and when we lose weight, we must lose the strength. This is a fundamental principle.

If we gain weight and feel weak, it is a disease and when we lose weight and gain strength, we are recovering from the disease. One is not supposed to gain more than 5kg of weight after the age of 20 years. Any weight gain after that will only be due to accumulation of fat, which leads to insulin resistance.

Insulin resistance does not allow food to convert into energy. In the state of insulin resistance, whatever you eat is converted into fat. As it is not converted into energy so you feel weak. When you reduce insulin resistance by drugs or walking, the metabolism becomes normal and whatever you eat gets converted into energy and you start gaining strength.