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Dr K K Aggarwal

Managing grief by free expressive writing

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Managing grief by free expressive writing

The loss of a loved is often painful. The resultant grief makes it hard to eat, sleep and leads to loss of interest in routine life affecting behavior and judgment. Some can feel agitated or exhausted, to sob unexpectedly, or to withdraw from the world and others may find themselves struggling with feelings of sorrow, numbness, anger, guilt, despair, irritability, relief, or anxiety. It is well known that disclosing deep emotions through writing can boost immune function as well as mood and well–being. Conversely, the stress of holding in strong feelings can ratchet up blood pressure and heart rate and increase muscle tension. One can write on a piece of paper, in your personal book, on the open website with nick name or keep it in the mind. One doesn’t have to preserve the emotions and can through away the writings. In absence of deeply troubling situations, such as suicide or a violent death, which are best explored with the help of an experienced therapist, one can choose writing as a way to express out the grief.

  • Start writing for 15 to 30 minutes a day for three to four days
  • Continue up to a week if it is helping
  • Continue writing for 15 to 30 min once a week for a month.
  • Writing has stronger effects when it extends over more days.
  • Remember, writing about grief and loss can trigger strong emotions (one may cry or feel deeply upset)
  • Many people find journal writing valuable and meaningful and report feeling better afterward.
  • Don’t worry about grammar or sentence structure.
  • Truly let go. Write down how you feel and why you feel that way. You’re writing for yourself, not others. (Source Harvard News Letter)

Managing grief by free expressive writing

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Managing grief by free expressive writing

The loss of a loved is often painful. The resultant grief makes it hard to eat, sleep and leads to loss of interest in routine life affecting behavior and judgment. Some can feel agitated or exhausted, to sob unexpectedly, or to withdraw from the world and others may find themselves struggling with feelings of sorrow, numbness, anger, guilt, despair, irritability, relief, or anxiety. It is well known that disclosing deep emotions through writing can boost immune function as well as mood and well–being. Conversely, the stress of holding in strong feelings can ratchet up blood pressure and heart rate and increase muscle tension. One can write on a piece of paper, in your personal book, on the open website with nick name or keep it in the mind. One doesn’t have to preserve the emotions and can through away the writings. In absence of deeply troubling situations, such as suicide or a violent death, which are best explored with the help of an experienced therapist, one can choose writing as a way to express out the grief.

  • Start writing for 15 to 30 minutes a day for three to four days
  • Continue up to a week if it is helping
  • Continue writing for 15 to 30 min once a week for a month.
  • Writing has stronger effects when it extends over more days.
  • Remember, writing about grief and loss can trigger strong emotions (one may cry or feel deeply upset)
  • Many people find journal writing valuable and meaningful and report feeling better afterward.
  • Don’t worry about grammar or sentence structure.
  • Truly let go. Write down how you feel and why you feel that way. You’re writing for yourself, not others. (Source Harvard News Letter)

Managing grief by free expressive writing

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Managing grief by free expressive writing

The loss of a loved is often painful. The resultant grief makes it hard to eat, sleep and leads to loss of interest in routine life affecting behavior and judgment.

Some can feel agitated or exhausted, to sob unexpectedly, or to withdraw from the world and others may find themselves struggling with feelings of sorrow, numbness, anger, guilt, despair, irritability, relief, or anxiety.

It is well known that disclosing deep emotions through writing can boost immune function as well as mood and well–being. Conversely, the stress of holding in strong feelings can increase blood pressure and heart rate and increase muscle tension.

One can write on a piece of paper, in your personal book, on the open website with nick name or keep it in the mind. One doesn’t have to preserve the emotions and can throw away the writings.

In absence of deeply troubling situations, such as suicide or a violent death, which are best explored with the help of an experienced therapist, one can choose writing as a way to express the grief.

  1. Start writing for 15 to 30 minutes a day for 3 to 4 days.
  2. Continue up to a week if it is helping.
  3. Continue writing for 15 to 30 minutes once a week for a month.
  4. Writing has stronger effects when it extends over for more number of days.
  5. Remember writing about grief and loss can trigger strong emotions (one may cry or feel deeply upset)
  6. Many people find journal writing valuable and meaningful and report feeling better afterward.
  7. Don’t worry about grammar or sentence structure.
  8. Truly let go. Write down how you feel and why you feel that way. You’re writing for yourself, not others. (Source Harvard News Letter)

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Is it necessary to take a dip in Ganga to remove your sins?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Is it necessary to take a dip in Ganga to remove your sins?

Ganga Jamuna and Saraswati the trio sangam in Allahabad is believed to be the holiest place in the country where taking a dip can wash away all past sins. After death ashes are also submerged in Ganga water with an assumption that the past sins will be removed. In Vedic era what was the intention of the rishis and munis while making this ritual In mythology moon represents cool mind and Ganga represents the positive flow of thoughts. And sea turmoil indicates the disturbed state of mind. Hanuman ki samudra yatra indicates the meditative journey through the flow of thoughts. Samudra manthan represents the journey of the mind during meditation. Taking a dip can be equated to shifting your mind towards your consciousness which can happen when you introspect in a relaxed state of mind or when you practice meditation. Meditation is defined as a journey from sympathetic and parasympathetic state of mind or a journey from disturbed state of consciousness to undisturbed state of consciousness. Every time you meditate you dip into your consciousness and clean your guilt and negative thoughts. It is something like reformatting your hard disk and removing the bad sectors and viruses in your software. It is therefore possible for you to do Ganga snan bath at your house in the morning while meditating or during pooja by drifting away from disturbed state of mind to non disturbed relaxed state of mind clearing your guilt and negative thoughts. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

Managing grief by free expressive writing

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Managing grief by free expressive writing

The loss of a loved is often painful. The resultant grief makes it hard to eat, sleep and leads to loss of interest in routine life affecting behavior and judgment. Some can feel agitated or exhausted, to sob unexpectedly, or to withdraw from the world and others may find themselves struggling with feelings of sorrow, numbness, anger, guilt, despair, irritability, relief, or anxiety. It is well known that disclosing deep emotions through writing can boost immune function as well as mood and well–being. Conversely, the stress of holding in strong feelings can increase blood pressure and heart rate and increase muscle tension. One can write on a piece of paper, in your personal book, on the open website with nick name or keep it in the mind. These emotions need not be preserved and the writings can be throw away. In absence of deeply troubling situations, such as suicide or a violent death, which are best explored with the help of an experienced therapist, one can choose writing as a way to express the grief. 1. Start writing for 15 to 30 minutes a day for 3 to 4 days. 2. Continue up to a week if it is helping. 3. Continue writing for 15 to 30 minutes once a week for a month. 4. Writing has stronger effects when it extends over for more number of days. 5. Remember writing about grief and loss can trigger strong emotions (one may cry or feel deeply upset) 6. Many people find journal writing valuable and meaningful and report feeling better afterward. 7. Don’t worry about grammar or sentence structure. 8. Truly let go. Write down how you feel and why you feel that way. You’re writing for yourself, not others