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Dr K K Aggarwal

Harvard 4 simple ways to boost your energy Dr KK Aggarwal, 16 February 2018

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Pace yourself: Keep going, but don’t risk overtaxing yourself. Instead of burning through all your battery life in two hours, spread it out between morning tasks, afternoon tasks, and evening activities, with rest and meals between.
  2. Take a walk or a nap: However, if you have trouble sleeping at night, napping can make the insomnia worse. If that’s the case for you, get moving instead. Get up and walk around the block, or just get up and move around. If you are not an insomniac, enjoy that 20– to 30–minute power nap.
  3. Skip most supplements: There is no evidence that they works
    • DHEA: There is no evidence that dehydroepiandrosterone or DHEA offers any real benefits.
    • Iron. Iron only improves energy if you are clearly deficient.
    • B vitamins. It is true that B vitamins (B1, B2, B6 and B12) help the body convert food into the form of energy that cells can burn, but taking more B vitamins does not supercharge your cells.

4. Fuel up wisely: A sugary bakery roll delivers plenty of calories, but your body tends to metabolize them faster, and then you can end up with sinking blood sugar and fatigue. You’ll maintain a steadier energy level by eating lean protein and unrefined carbohydrates. Try low–fat yogurt with a sprinkling of nuts, raisins, and honey

Harvard 4 simple ways to boost your energy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Harvard 4 simple ways to boost your energy

  1. Pace yourself: Keep going, but don’t risk overtaxing yourself. Instead of burning through all your battery life in two hours, spread it out between morning tasks, afternoon tasks, and evening activities — with rest and meals between.
  2. Take a walk or a nap: However, if you have trouble sleeping at night, napping can make the insomnia worse. If that’s the case for you, get moving instead. Get up and walk around the block, or just get up and move around. If you are not an insomniac, enjoy that 20– to 30–minute power nap.
  3. Skip most supplements. There is no evidence that they works.
    • DHEA: There is no evidence that DHEA offers any real benefits.
    • Iron. Iron only improves energy if you are clearly deficient.
    • B vitamins. It is true that B vitamins (B1, B2, B6, B12) help the body convert food into the form of energy that cells can burn, but taking more B vitamins doesn’t supercharge your cells.
  4. Fuel up wisely. A sugary bakery roll delivers plenty of calories, but your body tends to metabolize them faster, and then you can end up with sinking blood sugar and fatigue. You’ll maintain a steadier energy level by eating lean protein and unrefined carbohydrates. Try low–fat yogurt with a sprinkling of nuts, raisins, and honey.

Harvard 8 tips for buying shoes that are good to your feet

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Harvard 8 tips for buying shoes that are good to your feet

Start with your own feet, and look at what’s already in your closet. Stand barefoot on a piece of paper or cardboard, and trace the shape of each foot. Now take your shoes, one by one, and place them on top of the drawing. If you’re like most people, your “comfortable” shoes will closely match the outline of your own feet.

Identify the shoes that cause pain. If you’re a woman, most of these will be shoes with narrow toes or high heels. Check to see if the toe of the shoe is narrower or shorter than your own toes.

  1. Wait until the afternoon to shop for shoes — your feet naturally expand with use during the day and may swell in hot weather.
  2. Wear the same type of socks that you intend to wear with the shoes.
  3. Have the salesperson measure both of your feet. If one foot is larger or wider than the other, buy a size that fits the larger foot.
  4. Stand in the shoes. Make sure you have at least a quarter– to a half–inch of space between your longest toe and the end of the shoe.
  5. Walk around in the shoes to determine how they feel. Is there enough room at the balls of the feet? Do the heels fit snugly, or do they pinch or slip off? Don’t rationalize that the shoes just need to be “broken in” or that they’l stretch with time. Find shoes that fit from the start.
  6. Trust your own comfort level rather than a shoe’s size or description. Sizes vary from one manufacturer to another. You’re the real judge.
  7. Feel the inside of the shoes to see if they have any tags, seams, or other material that might irritate your feet or cause blisters.
  8. Turn the shoes over and examine the soles. Are they sturdy enough to provide protection from sharp objects? Do they provide any cushioning? Also, take the sole test as you walk around the shoe store: do the soles cushion against impact? Try to walk on hard surfaces as well as carpet to see how the shoes feel.