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Dr K K Aggarwal

Too much salt damages blood vessels and cause high BP

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Eating a high-salt diet for several years is associated with markers of blood vessel damage like high uric acid and presence of albumin in the urine.  People with any of these markers of blood vessel damage, who eat a high-salt diet, are more likely to develop high blood pressure.

The study published in the journal Circulation analyzed the association between sodium consumption and blood levels of uric acid and albumin in the urine — both markers of blood vessel damage — in participants not taking high blood pressure medicine.

  1. Higher sodium intake was associated with increasing levels of uric acid and albumin over time.  The higher the levels of these markers, the greater the risk of developing hypertension if dietary salt intake was high.
  2. Compared with participants eating the least amount of sodium (2.2 grams a day), those eating the most (6.2 grams mg/d) were 21 percent more likely to develop high blood pressure.
  3. Those who had high uric acid levels and ate the most salt were 32 percent more likely to develop high blood pressure while those with high urine albumin levels and highest salt intake were 86 percent more likely to develop high blood pressure.

If you have high BP, keep your sugar lower than 90

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Hypertension is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. If not properly managed they are likely to end up with diabetes with subsequent high risk of kidney damage.

The results of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA) study have shown that the major predictor of new-onset diabetes (NOD) in patients with hypertension is high baseline fasting plasma glucose levels of more than 90mg/dL. The risk increases by 5.8 times for each 18mg/dl rise above 90 mg/dL.

Other risk factors are higher weight, higher blood pressure and higher triglyceride levels. Hypertensive patients on atenolol (beta blocker drug) with or without a diuretic are also at risk.

On the other hand, high BP patients on amlodipine (calcium blocker) ± perindopril (ACE inhibitor), with high good HDL cholesterol levels, moderate alcohol use and age older than 55 years are protected from developing diabetes.

Some measurement mistakes that can lead to high BP

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Having a full bladder – This can add 10-15 points to your reading. You should always empty your bladder before measuring blood pressure.
  2. Slouching, unsupported back/feet – Poor support when sitting can increase your reading by 6-10points. Make sure you’re in a chair with your back supported and feet flat on the floor or a footstool.
  3. Unsupported arm – If your arm is hanging by your side or you have to hold it up during a reading, you may see numbers up to 10 points higher than they should be. Position your arm on a chair or counter, so that the measurement cuff is level with your heart.
  4. Wrapping the cuff over clothing – This common error can add 5-50 points to your reading. Instead, be sure the cuff is placed on a bare arm.
  5. When the cuff is too small – Your pressure may read 2-10 points higher. Ensure a proper fit. Your healthcare provider can help you with this.
  6. Sitting with crossed legs – While polite, it could increase a blood pressure reading 2-8 points. It’s best to uncross your legs as well as ensure your feet are supported.
  7. Talking – Answering questions, talking on the phone, etc. can add 10 points. Stay still and silent to ensure an accurate measurement.

Some measurement mistakes that can lead to high BP

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Some measurement mistakes that can lead to high BP

  1. Having a full bladder – This can add 10-15 points to your reading. You should always empty your bladder before measuring blood pressure.
  2. Slouching, unsupported back/feet – Poor support when sitting can increase your reading by 6-10points. Make sure you’re in a chair with your back supported and feet flat on the floor or a footstool.
  3. Unsupported arm – If your arm is hanging by your side or you have to hold it up during a reading, you may see numbers up to 10 points higher than they should be. Position your arm on a chair or counter, so that the measurement cuff is level with your heart.
  4. Wrapping the cuff over clothing – This common error can add 5-50 points to your reading. Instead, be sure the cuff is placed on a bare arm.
  5. When the cuff is too small – Your pressure may read 2-10 points higher. Ensure a proper fit. Your healthcare provider can help you with this.
  6. Sitting with crossed legs – While polite, it could increase a blood pressure reading 2-8 points. It’s best to uncross your legs as well as ensure your feet are supported.
  7. Talking – Answering questions, talking on the phone, etc. can add 10 points. Stay still and silent to ensure an accurate measurement.

Sugar, not salt, may be at fault for high BP

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Sugar, not salt, may be at fault for high BP

Sugar, not salt contributes to the majority of the hypertension risk associated with processed food and a reduction in the consumption of added sugars and, in particular, processed foods may translate into decreased rates of hypertension as well as decreased cardiometabolic disease.

James J. DiNicolantanio, PharmD, from Saint Lukes Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Missouri, and Sean C. Lucan, MD, MPH, from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York, published their review of epidemiological and experimental studies in the journal Open Heart. They concluded that high-sugar diets may make a significant contribution to cardiometabolic risk.

Highly refined processed foods should be replaced by natural whole foods.

If you have high BP keep your sugar lower than 90

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on If you have high BP keep your sugar lower than 90

Hypertension is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. If not properly managed they are likely to end up with diabetes with subsequent high risk of kidney damage.

The results of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA) study have shown that the major predictor of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension is high baseline fasting plasma glucose levels of more than 90mg/dL. The risk increases by 5.8 times for each 18mg/dL rise above 90 mg/dL.

Other risk factors are higher weight, higher blood pressure and higher triglyceride levels. Patients of high BP taking the drugs atenolol (beta-blocker) regimen with or without a diuretic are also at risk.

On the other hand, high BP patients on amlodipine (calcium blocker) ± perindopril (ACE inhibitor), with high good HDL cholesterol levels, moderate alcohol use and age older than 55 years have protection from developing diabetes.

Even a feeling of helping someone can make a difference.

If you have high BP keep your sugar lower than 90

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on If you have high BP keep your sugar lower than 90

Hypertension is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. If not properly managed they are likely to end up with diabetes with subsequent high risk of kidney damage.

The results of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA) study have shown that the major predictor of new-onset diabetes (NOD) in patients with hypertension is high baseline fasting plasma glucose levels of more than 90mg/dL. The risk increases by 5.8 times for each 18mg/dl rise above 90 mg/dL.

Other risk factors are higher weight, higher blood pressure and higher triglyceride levels. Hypertensive patients on atenolol (beta blocker drug) with or without a diuretic are also at risk.

On the other hand, high BP patients on amlodipine (calcium blocker) ± perindopril (ACE inhibitor), with high good HDL cholesterol levels, moderate alcohol use and age older than 55 years are protected from developing diabetes.

 

Sugar, not salt, may be at fault for high BP

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Sugar, not salt, may be at fault for high BP

Sugar, not salt contributes to the majority of the hypertension risk associated with processed food and a reduction in the consumption of added sugars and, in particular, processed foods may translate into decreased rates of hypertension as well as decreased cardiometabolic disease. James J. DiNicolantanio, PharmD, from Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Missouri, and Sean C. Lucan, MD, MPH, from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York, published their review of epidemiological and experimental studies in the journal Open Heart. They concluded that high-sugar diets may make a significant contribution to cardiometabolic risk. Highly refined processed foods should be replaced by natural whole foods.