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Dr K K Aggarwal

All about Fits or Epilepsy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Seizure is a sudden change in behavior that is the consequence of brain dysfunction.
  • Approximately 0.5-1% of the population has epilepsy.
  • Some seizures are provoked, i.e., that occur in the metabolic derangement, drug or alcohol withdrawal and in situations like acute paralysis or acute encephalitis. Such patients are not considered to have epilepsy because these seizures would not recur in the absence of the provocation.
  • Less than 50% of epilepsy cases will have an identifiable cause such as head trauma, brain tumor, paralysis, infection, brain malformation, etc.
  • Having one seizure does not always mean that the patient would always get a seizure.
  • One episode of seizure may not require treatment.
  • Hospitalization is required in the first seizure only if it is associated with prolonged post-seizure altered level of consciousness.
  • Patients with unprovoked seizure may not be allowed to drive for some time.
  • In children, seizure can occur with high grade fever.
  • In adults, the first episode of seizure may be due to worms in the brain. In such a situation, it may be necessary to do an MRI test.
  • A patient with seizure can get married, live a normal life and produce children.
  • It is a misnomer that during a fit, you need to make the person smell a shoe.
  • During a seizure, use a spoon instead to prevent tongue bite. Never put the fingers inside the mouth of the patient as you could be bitten.
  • A patient with epilepsy fall will have stiffness in the body; on the contrary, a patient with cardiac loss of consciousness will fall loose.
  • A seizure that lasts for more than 5-10 minutes requires specialized attention.

Lassa fever: Some tips from HCFI

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Avoiding rodents (multimammate rats).
  2. Consider all patients as infectious even if signs and symptoms are mild.
  3. All standard, contact, and droplet precautions as well as correct use of appropriate personal protective equipment should be strictly adhered to.
  4. Blood and body fluid specimens from patients with suspected Lassa fever infection should be considered highly infectious. Caution should be exercised when handling such material.
  5. Postexposure prophylaxis with oral ribavirin for contacts with known or suspected Lassa fever infection with risk factors for transmission such as penetrating needle stick injury, exposure of mucous membranes or broken skin to blood or body fluids, and participation in procedures involving exposure to bodily fluids or respiratory secretions without use of personal protective equipment.

Myths

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• The right skin cream can keep your skin looking young: For reducing wrinkles, the topical treatment with the best evidence behind it is retinoic acid. The best ways to keep wrinkles at bay are using sunscreen and not smoking.

• Antibacterial soap is best for keeping your skin clean: Many experts are concerned that the use of antibacterial soap could lead to more antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Antibacterial soap is not necessary for everyday use. Regular soap is fine. Thorough and consistent hand-washing, not antibacterial soap is what helps prevent the spread of infection.