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Dr K K Aggarwal

Nail Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Nails can harbor dirt and germs and contribute to the spread of many infections. Keep nails short. Trim nails often. Scrub the underside of nails with soap or water each time you wash your hands. Clean any nail grooming tools before use. Nail grooming tools should be sterilized before use in saloons. Avoid biting or chewing nails. Avoid cutting cuticles as they act as barriers to prevent infection. Never rip or bite a hang nail instead clip it with a clear sterilized nail trimmer a hang nail is small torn piece of skin next to finger nail or toe nail . Infections of the finger nails or toe nails are often characterized by swelling of the skin or thickening of the nail. In some cases these infections may be serious and need to be treated by a doctor.

Nail Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Nail Hygiene

• Nails can harbor dirt and germs and contribute to the spread of many infections.

• Keep nails short.

• Trim nails often.

• Scrub the underside of nails with soap or water each time you wash your hands.

• Clean any nail grooming tools before use.

• Nail grooming tools should be sterilized before use in saloon.

• Avoid biting nails.

• Avoid chewing nails.

• Avoid cutting cuticles as they act as barriers to prevent infection.

• Never rip or bite a hang nail, instead clip it with a clear sterilized nail trimmer (a hang nail is small torn piece of skin next to finger nail or toe nail).

• Infections of the finger nails or toe nails are often characterized by swelling of the skin or thickening of the nail. In some cases these infections may be serious and need to be treated by a doctor.

Nail Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Nail Hygiene

Nails can harbor dirt and germs and contribute to the spread of many infections.

• Keep nails short.

• Trim nails often.

• Scrub the underside of nails with soap or water each time you wash your hands.

• Clean any nail grooming tools before use.

• Nail grooming tools should be sterilized before use in saloon.

• Avoid biting nails.

• Avoid chewing nails.

• Avoid cutting cuticles as they act as barriers to prevent infection.

• Never rip or bite a hang nail, instead clip it with a clear sterilized nail trimmer (a hang nail is small torn piece of skin next to finger nail or toe nail).

• Infections of the finger nails or toe nails are often characterized by swelling of the skin or thickening of the nail. In some cases these infections may be serious and need to be treated by a doctor.

Water Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Safe water is an essential commodity for prevention of most water and food-borne diseases like diarrhea, typhoid and jaundice. These diseases are 100% preventable. All of them can be lethal if not prevented, diagnosed or treated in time. Transmission of parasitic infections can also occur with contaminated water. Here are a few tips:

• Travelers should avoid consuming tap water.

• Avoid ice made from tap water.

• Avoid any food rinsed in tap water.

• Chlorination kills most bacterial and viral pathogens.

• Chlorination does not kill giardia or amoeba cysts.

• Chlorination does not kill Cryptosporidium.

• Boiled/Treated/Bottled water is safe.

• Carbonated drinks, wine and drinks made with boiled water are safe.

• Freezing does not kill organisms that cause diarrhea. Ice in drinks is not safe unless it has been made from adequately boiled or filtered water.

• Alcohol does not sterilize water or the ice. Mixed drinks may still be contaminated.

• Hot tea and coffee are the best alternates to boiled water.

• Bottled drinks should be requested without ice and should be drunk from the bottle with a straw rather than with a glass.

• Boiling water for 3 minutes followed by cooling to room temperature will kill bacterial parasites.

• Adding two drops of 5% sodium hydrochloride (bleach) to quarter of water (1 liter) will kill most bacteria in 30 minutes.

Cough Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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When you cough or sneeze, you tend to expel out respiratory waste, which can be droplets (larger than 5 microns) or airborne droplet less than 5 microns; both have different implications. • Droplets remain suspended in the air only for a limited period and exposure of less than 3 feet is usually required for human to human transmission of droplet–borne respiratory organisms. In flu this can be upto 6 feet. The examples of droplet infections are patients with meningitis, influenza, rubella (German measles) etc.

• No precautions need to be taken by a person, who is 6–10 feet away from the patient but if a person is sitting or working even at a distance of 3–6 feet, the non–coughing person should wear simple mask.

• In contrast, airborne droplet nuclei, which carry respiratory secretions smaller than 5 microns can remain suspended in the air for extended period and can cause infections to people who are standing even more than 10 feet away. The example of airborne droplet nuclei infections are TB, measles, chickenpox and SARS.

• Patients with these diseases require to be placed in an isolation room and all those people who are looking after these patients must use a safe N95 mask.

• In normal house with open windows, there is a constant exchange of air, which prevents spread of infections but in rooms with air conditioners (ACs) with no air exchange, the infections can spread from one person to another.

• When sitting in an air conditioned atmosphere, the setting of the AC should be such that the same air is not circulated and fresh air is allowed to exchange. Split ACs, therefore, are more dangerous than the window ACs.

• In an office with split AC, if one of the employees is suffering from any of the droplet nuclei disease, he/she can transmit infection to others. Therefore, patients with confirmed TB, measles, chickenpox and SARS should not be allowed to work in offices with split ACs.

Mobile Phones Can Spread Infections In The Hospital

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Mobile phones used by hospital healthcare workers are often contaminated with germs, including those that can cause illness in hospitalized patients.

In a study published in the BMC journal Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials, Turkish researchers swabbed the dominant hand and the mobile phones of 200 doctors, nurses and other healthcare staff working in intensive care units and operating rooms and found that 95 percent of telephones were contaminated, often with more than one type of microbe and often with antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Potentially serious infectious bugs such as staphylococci were isolated from phones in intensive care units.

Ninety percent of health care workers said they never cleaned their mobile phones. The investigators recommend routine decontamination of mobile phones with alcohol-containing disinfectants.