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Dr K K Aggarwal

Who is a Good Teacher?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A good teacher is the one who follows the principles of listening first, teaching in detail till confusion arises and then teaching with reasoning while going into the minutest details and finally summarizing the ‘take–home’ messages.

This is how Lord Krishna discoursed to Arjuna in Bhagavad Gita. In the first chapter, he only listens, in the second, he gives detailed counseling and from chapters 2 to 17, he gives reasoning and in 18th chapter, he revises.

Who is a Good Teacher?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Who is a Good Teacher?

A good teacher is the one who follows the principles of listening first, teaching in detail till confusion arises and then teaching with reasoning while going into the minutest details and finally summarizing the ‘take–home’ messages.

This is what Lord Krishna taught to Arjuna in Bhagavad Gita. In the first chapter, he only listens, in the second, he gives detailed counseling, from 2 to 17 chapters, he gives reasoning and in 18th chapter, he revises.

(Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views)

Who is a Good Teacher?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Who is a Good Teacher?

A good teacher is the one who follows the principles of listening first, teaching in detail till confusion arises and then teaching with reasoning while going into the minutest details and finally summarizing the ‘take-home’ messages.

This is what Lord Krishna taught to Arjuna in Bhagavad Gita. In the first chapter, he only listens, in the second, he gives detailed counseling, from 2 to 17 chapter, he gives reasoning and in 18th chapter, he revises.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Direct all your energy towards the soul and not the ego

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The epic Mahabharata can also be understood as a science of inner Mahabharata happening in everybody’s mind.

Lord Krishna symbolizes the consciousness and the five Pandavas, the five positive qualities of a person namely, righteousness (Yudhishthir), focus (Arjuna), power to fight injustice (Bheem), helping others (Sahdev) and learning to be neutral in difficult situations (Nakul). Panchali indicates the five senses, which can only be controlled when these five forces are together.

Dhritarashtra symbolizes ignorance, Duhshasan negative ruling quality (dusht while ruling) and Duryodhana (dusht in yudh) one who is not balanced in war.

Conscious-based decisions need to be taken to kill the negativity in the mind. Every action, if directed towards the consciousness or the soul, is the right action. To kill all the 100 Kauravas (the 100 negative tendencies a person can have) controlled by Duryodhan and Duhshasan along with Shakuni (the negative power of cunningness), positive qualities have to be redirected towards consciousness and then take right decisions.

The five Pandavas (positive qualities) made soul (Lord Krishna) as their point of reference (Sarthi) and won over the evils (Kauravas).

Bhishma Pitamah, Karna and Dronacharya, individually all had winning powers; but, they all supported negative thoughts and made Duryodhana as their point of reference and ultimately had to die.

The message is very clear, if one directs his or her positive powers towards ego as the reference point in long run, they will be of no use and, in fact, will be responsible for one’s destruction.

Ravana too was a great scholar but he directed all his energies and powers towards his ego and ended up in misery.

Therefore, one should cultivate a positive mental attitude, positive thoughts instead of directing them towards desire, attachment or ego and should direct them to soul/consciousness for a positive outcome.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own)

Ganesha, the Stress Management Guru

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If Lord Krishna was the first counselor who taught the principles of counseling, Lord Ganesha taught us the principles of stress management.

We should worship Lord Ganesha and become like him whenever we face any difficulty or are stressed out.

The elephant head of Lord Ganesha symbolizes that when in difficulty, use your wisdom, intelligence and think differently. It can be equated to the Third Eye of Lord Shiva. Elephant is supposed to be the most intelligent animal in the kingdom. Here, wisdom means to think before speaking. Lord Buddha also said that don’t speak unless it is necessary and is truthful and kind.

The big elephant ears of Lord Ganesha signify listening to everybody when in difficulty. Elephant ears are known to hear long distances. Elephant eye see a long distance and in terms of mythology, it represents acquiring the quality of foreseeing when in difficulty. The mouth of Lord Ganesha represents speaking less and hearing and listening more.

The big tummy of Lord Ganesha represents digesting any information gathered by listening to people in difficulty. The trunk denotes using the power of discrimination to decide from the retained information. It also indicates doing both smaller and bigger things by yourself. The elephant trunk can pick up a needle as well as a tree.

The teeth, broken and unbroken, signify to be in a state of balance in loss and gain. This implies that one should not get upset if the task is not accomplished and also not get excited if the task is accomplished. In times of difficulty, Ganesha also teaches us not to lose strength and control one’s attachments, desires and greed.

The four arms of Lord Ganesha represent strength. Ropes in two hands indicate attachment; Laddoo or Sweet in one hand represent desires and mouse represents greed. Riding over the mouse indicates controlling one’s greed.

Lord Ganesha is worshipped either when a new work is initiated or when one finds it difficult to complete a job or work. In these two situations, these principles of Lord Ganesha need to be inculcated in one’s habits.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own

Who is a Good Teacher?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Who is a Good Teacher?

A good teacher is the one who follows the principles of listening first, teaching in detail till confusion arises and then teaching with reasoning while going into the minutest details and finally summarizing the ‘take–home’ messages.

This is what Lord Krishna taught to Arjuna in Bhagavad Gita. In the first chapter, he only listens, in the second, he gives detailed counseling, from 2 to 17 chapters, he gives reasoning and in 18th chapter, he revises.

(Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views)

Direct all your energy towards the soul and nor the ego

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Direct all your energy towards the soul and nor the ego

 

The epic Mahabharata can also be understood as a science of inner Mahabharata happening in everybody’s mind.

Lord Krishna symbolizes the consciousness and the five Pandavas, the five positive qualities of a person namely, righteousness (Yudhishthir), focused (Arjuna), power to fight injustice (Bheem), helping others (Sahdev) and learning to be neutral in difficult situations (Nakul). Panchali indicates the five senses, which can only be controlled when these five forces are together.

Dhritrashtra symbolizes ignorance, Dushasan negative ruling quality (dusht while ruling) and Duryodhana (dusht in yudh) one who is not balanced in war.

Conscious-based decisions need to be taken to kill the negativity in the mind. Every action, if directed towards the consciousness or the soul, is the right action. To kill all the 100 Kauravas (the 100 negative tendencies a person can have) controlled by Duryodhan and Duhshasan along with Shakuni (the negative power of cunningness), positive qualities have to be redirected towards consciousness and take right decisions.

The five Pandavas (positive qualities) made soul (Lord Krishna) as their point of reference (Sarthi) and won over the evils (Kauravas).

Bhishma Pitamah, Karna and Dronacharya, individually all had winning powers; but, they all supported negative thoughts and made Duryodhana as their point of reference and ultimately had to die.

The message is very clear – if one directs his or her positive powers towards ego as the reference point in long run, they will be of no use and, in fact, will be responsible for one’s destruction.

Ravana too was a great scholar but he directed all his energies and powers towards his ego and ended up in misery.

Therefore, one should cultivate a positive mental attitude, positive thoughts instead of directing them towards desire, attachment or ego and should direct them to soul/consciousness for a positive outcome.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Makar Sankranti: Uttarayana: The Medical Importance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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An extremely auspicious day, Lohri marks the sun’s entry in to the ‘Makar Rashi’.  The next day after lohri is Makar Sankranti. One can remember lohri as the end of winter and Makar Sankranti as the first day of summer.

The word Sankranti means “change of direction” and the sun changes its direction north wards on the day of Makar Sankranti.

The period, beginning from 14 January (Makar Sankranti) lasting till 14 July, is known as Uttarayana (“Uttar” North and “ayan” movement towards).  It is also the last day of the month of Maargazhi, which is the ninth month of the lunar calendar. The Bhagawad Gita deems it as an extremely sacred and auspicious time when Lord Krishna manifests himself most tangibly.  Bhishma Pitamah in Mahabharata also waited for this period (not day) to relieve his body.  Uttarayana is considered to be the holiest half of the year. In Bhagavad Gita, the Lord says, “I am Uttarayana among the Ayanas.”

In chapter 8 shloka 24 Lord Krishna has said “Those who know the Supreme Brahman attain that Supreme by passing away from the world during the influence of the fiery god, in the light, at an auspicious moment of the day, during the fortnight of the waxing moon, or during the six months when the sun travels in the north.”

The earth, farthest from the sun at this point of time, starts its journey towards the sun, thus ending the coldest month of the year (peak winter), Paush, and announcing the start of the month of Magh.

As per the “Puranas” Dakshinayana (The other six month period) is the night of the deities whereas Uttarayana is their day. It’s the time to take a dip in the Ganges at sun rise and at sunset and say good bye to winter foods.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Who is a good teacher?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Health Care - Ask Dr KK | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Who is a good teacher?

A good teacher is the one who follows the principles of listening first, teaching in detail till confusion arises and then teaching with reasoning while going into the minutest details and finally summarizing the ‘take–home’ messages.

This is how Lord Krishna discoursed to Arjuna in Bhagavad Gita. In the first chapter, he only listens, in the second, he gives detailed counseling and from chapters 2 to 17, he gives reasoning and in 18th chapter, he revises.

 (Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Win Relationships and Not Arguments

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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It is a well known saying that when you are arguing with a wrong boss you may win the argument but you may invariably lose the relationship and not argument. Lord Krishna was born after Lord Rama and Krishna taught us when to say sorry even if you are not at fault. Never hurt the ego of a person who is under influence of alcohol or boss when he is angry. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

Every one cannot be a spiritual seeker. In fact majority is not interested in seeking spiritual knowledge and they keep themselves busy in the worldly desires. To become a good seeker one need to acquire many qualities. In Bhagavad Gita Arjuna in a state of disturbed mind sought guidance from Lord Krishna. In Katha Upanishad Nachiketa as a healthy seeker learned the knowledge of life after death from Yama. Katha Upanishad described in detail the qualities of a seeker in Nachiketa. The story goes as under Vajashrava sage performed a sacrifice in which he was required to give away all his worldly possessions. His son Nachiketa saw that the cows given in the donations were all old. Such charity was not going to give his father any merits. Feeling disturbed by the inappropriateness of his father s observance of the sacrifice Nachiketa asked to whom was he given. The sage ignored him twice but on third asking the irritated sage said in anger Unto Yama I give thee. Whereupon Nachiketa went to the abode of Yama and finding him absent waited there for three days and nights. Yama on his return offered to grant him three wishes. Nachiketa wished the following 1. To be allowed to return to his father alive and that his father not be angry with him 2. To be instructed about fire sacrifice 3. To be given knowledge about life after death Yama granted the first wish immediately. In answer to Nachiketa s second question Yama named performance of a special fire sacrifice after Nachiketa. Before answering the third question Yama tested Nachiketa offering him all sorts of worldly pleasures instead but Nachiketa insists. And then Yama taught him about life after death. The properties of true seeker therefore are 1. Righteousness and truthfulness Nachiketa did not agree with his father as his fathers act was not based on Dharma. 2. Persistence He waited for three days to meet Yama. 3. Compassion and forgiveness The first boon he asked was to have his father forgiven. 4. Intellectual understanding The fire of knowledge means intellectual understanding. 5. Let go off the desires He let go all his desires and did not get attracted to the worldly offers given by the Yama. Only after that he qualified to receive the knowledge of soul and become a true seeker. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

The lips of truth shall be recognized forever, a lying tongue is but for a moment

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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This sutra from Bible has a very deep significance in day to day life. The truth is ever lasting and always ends up in internal happiness and self realization. And in the long run it always gives you happiness and an all win situation. A lying tongue on the contrary will only give you a momentary pleasure but will lead to or create some difficulty later in life. Spoken words cannot come back just as in the case of a released arrow from the bow. Once lost one cannot get back his youth virginity or respect. Similarly spoken bad words cannot be taken back and once spoken will create negative waves in the other persons on whom they were spoken mind which will persist as repressed thoughts or memory in the people s mind forever. Such bad memories will keep on coming back in the person s mind causing damage to the personal relationships. A spoken word is a karmic expression. For every karmic action there is an opposite and equal reaction. For every negative karmic action one has to pay the debt either now or in future. The law of karma says that every debt has to be paid. It is always better to avoid negative language both in spoken words as well as in the mind. The yoga sutras of Patanjali describe thinking speaking or doing anything wrong as having the same karmic significance. We should not only purify ourselves in actions and spoken words but also in the mind. If a person keeps negative thoughts in the mind sooner or later the same will be reflected to the outside world. The momentary pleasure which one gets by lying has no spiritual significance as it only satisfies your ego sense or makes you attached to any of the five senses. The transient pleasure experienced by the body stimulates a chain of reactions consisting of action memory and desire leading to action again which will only intensify the greed attachments. In the Mahabharata Lord Krishna has given only two examples which work as an exception to such a situation. Any truth which harms others may not be spoken and any lie which does not harm anyone but benefits a few may be spoken. Truth is the opposite of doubt and it is always better to clear all the doubts from the mind as any repressed doubts can end up into causation of heart attack paralysis and cancer. Truth also means taking conscious based decisions as the consciousness will never lie. While taking any decision always ask oneself Is it the truth Is it necessary And will it bring happiness to me and the people around Lord Krishna is also described as Satchitanand which only indicates qualities like truthfulness conscious based decisions and internal happiness. Truthfulness has to be practiced for over a period of time and made a part and parcel of your daily life. To start with a person may have bad experiences but in the long run truthfulness will always win. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

Who is a Good Teacher?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Who is a Good Teacher?

A good teacher is the one who follows the principles of listening first teaching in detail till confusion arises and then teaching with reasoning while going into the minutest details and finally summarizing the take home messages. This is how Lord Krishna discoursed to Arjuna in Bhagavad Gita. In the first chapter he only listens in the second he gives detailed counseling and from chapters 2 to 17 he gives reasoning and in 18th chapter he revises. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

Ganesha, the Stress Management Guru – Dr KK Aggarwal

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If Lord Krishna was the first counselor who taught the principles of counseling, Lord Ganesha taught us the principles of stress management. We should worship Lord Ganesha and become like him whenever we face any difficulty or are stressed out. The elephant head of Lord Ganesha symbolizes that when in difficulty, use your wisdom, intelligence and think differently. It can be equated to the Third Eye of Lord Shiva. Elephant is supposed to be the most intelligent animal in the kingdom. Here, wisdom means to think before speaking. Lord Buddha also said that don’t speak unless it is necessary and is truthful and kind. The big elephant ears of Lord Ganesha signify listening to everybody when in difficulty. Elephant ears are known to hear long distances. Elephant eye see a long distance and in terms of mythology, it represents acquiring the quality of foreseeing when in difficulty. The mouth of Lord Ganesha represents speaking less and hearing and listening more. The big tummy of Lord Ganesha represents digesting any information gathered by listening to people in difficulty. The trunk denotes using the power of discrimination to decide from the retained information. It also indicates doing both smaller and bigger things by yourself. The elephant trunk can pick up a needle as well as a tree. The teeth, broken and unbroken, signify to be in a state of balance in loss and gain. This implies that one should not get upset if the task is not accomplished and also not get excited if the task is accomplished. In times of difficulty, Ganesha also teaches us not to lose strength and control one’s attachments, desires and greed. The four arms of Lord Ganesha represent strength. Ropes in two hands indicate attachment; Laddoo or Sweet in one hand represent desires and mouse represents greed. Riding over the mouse indicates controlling one’s greed. Lord Ganesha is worshipped either when a new work is initiated or when one finds it difficult to complete a job or work. In these two situations, these principles of Lord Ganesha need to be inculcated in one’s habits. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own

Who is a Good Teacher?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Who is a Good Teacher?

A good teacher is the one who follows the principles of listening first, teaching in detail till confusion arises and then teaching with reasoning while going into the minutest details and finally summarizing the ‘take–home’ messages. This is what Lord Krishna taught to Arjuna in Bhagavad Gita. In the first chapter, he only listens, in the second, he gives detailed counseling, from 2 to 17 chapters, he gives reasoning and in 18th chapter, he revises. (Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views)