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Dr K K Aggarwal

Makar Sankranti: Uttarayana: The Medical Importance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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An extremely auspicious day, Lohri marks the sun’s entry in to the ‘Makar Rashi’.  The next day after lohri is Makar Sankranti. One can remember lohri as the end of winter and Makar sankranti as the first day of summer.

 

The word Sankranti means “change of direction” and the sun change its direction north wards on the day of Makar Sankranti.

 

The period, beginning from 14 January (Makar Sankranti) lasting till 14 July, is known as Uttarayana (“Uttar” North and “ayan” movement towards).  It is also the last day of the month of Maargazhi, which is the ninth month of the lunar calendar. The Bhagawad Gita deems it as an extremely sacred and auspicious time when Lord Krishna manifests himself most tangibly.  Bhisham Pitamah in Mahbharata also waited for this period (not day) to relieve his body.  Uttarayana is considered to be the holiest half of the year. In Bhagavad Gita, the Lord says, “I am Uttarayana among the Ayanas.”

 

In chapter 8 shloka 24 Lord Krishna has said “Those who know the Supreme Brahman attain that Supreme by passing away from the world during the influence of the fiery god, in the light, at an auspicious moment of the day, during the fortnight of the waxing moon, or during the six months when the sun travels in the north.”

 

The earth, farthest from the sun at this point of time, starts its journey towards the sun, thus ending the coldest month of the year (peak winter), Paush, and announcing the start of the month of Magh.

 

As per the “Puranas” Dakshinayana (The other six month period) is the night of the deities whereas Uttarayana is their day. It’s the time to take a dip in the Ganges at sun rise and at sunset and say good bye to winter foods.

 

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Human body needs servicing too!

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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While automobile vehicles need preventive servicing every three months, the human body needs it every two months.

According to Ayurveda, the seasons change every two months, approximately in the middle of the month.

Ayurveda describes these changes and precautions to be taken in great detail. The current makar rashi season, which starts today with sun changing its direction northwards resulting into lengthening of day and shortening of night time needs many lifestyle changes to balance health and prevent diseases. Vata gets aggravated, kapha gets accumulated and pitta gets depleted in this season.

In allopathic language, pitta denotes metabolic functions, vata signifies movement functions and kapha stands for secretory functions of the body.

Lohri, Makar Sankranti and Pongal are celebrated with khichdi, milk, gur, bhaat, sesame (Til) laddu, light hot food and beverages, etc. all indicating measures to reduce vata and kapha and to increase pitta in the body.

Human body needs servicing too

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Human body needs servicing too

While automobile vehicles need preventive servicing every three months, the human body needs it every two months. According to Ayurveda, the seasons change every two months, approximately in the middle of the month. Ayurveda describes these changes and precautions to be taken in great detail. The current makar rashi season, which starts today with sun changing its direction northwards resulting into lengthening of day and shortening of night time needs many lifestyle changes to balance health and prevent diseases. Vata gets aggravated, kapha gets accumulated and pitta gets depleted in this season. In allopathic language, pitta denotes metabolic functions, vata signifies movement functions and kapha stands for secretory functions of the body. Lohri, Makar Sankranti and Pongal are celebrated with khichdi, milk, gur, bhaat, sesame (Til) laddu, light hot food and beverages, etc. all indicating measures to reduce vata and kapha and to increase pitta in the body.

Makar Sankranti: Uttarayana: The Medical Importance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Makar Sankranti: Uttarayana: The Medical Importance

An extremely auspicious day, Lohri marks the sun’s entry into the ‘Makar Rashi’. The next day after lohri is Makar Sankranti. One can remember lohri as the last day of winter and maker sankranti as the first day of summer.

The word Sankranti means “change of direction” and the sun changes its direction north words on the day of makar Sankranti.

The period, beginning from 14 January (Makar Sankranti) lasting till 14 July, is known as Uttarayana (“Uttar” North and “ayan” movement towards). It is also the last day of the month of Maargazhi (Dhanur), which is the ninth month of the lunar calendar. The Bhagawad Gita deems it as an extremely sacred and auspicious time when Lord Krishna manifests himself most tangibly. Bhishma Pitamah in Mahabharata also waited for this period (not day) to leave his body. Uttarayana is considered to be the holiest half of the year. In Bhagavad Gita, the Lord says, “I am Uttarayana among the Ayanas.”

In chapter 8 shloka 24 Lord Krishna has said “Those who know the Supreme Brahman attain that Supreme by passing away from the world during the influence of the fiery god, in the light, at an auspicious moment of the day, during the fortnight of the waxing moon, or during the six months when the sun travels in the north.”

The earth, farthest from the sun at this point of time, starts its journey towards the sun, thus ending the coldest month of the year (peak winter), Paush, and announcing the start of the month of Magh.

As per “Puranas”, Dakshinayana (the other six month period) is the night of the deities where as Uttarayana is their day. It’s the time to start a dip in Ganges at sun rise and at sunset and say good bye to winter foods.

Makar Sankranti: Uttarayana: The Medical Importance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Makar Sankranti: Uttarayana: The Medical Importance

An extremely auspicious day, Lohri marks the sun’s entry into the ‘Makar Rashi’. The next day after lohri is Makar Sankranti. One can remember Lohri as the last day of winter and Makar Sankranti as the first day of summer.

The word Sankranti means “change of direction” and the sun changes its direction northwards on the day of Makar Sankranti.

The period, beginning from 14 January (Makar Sankranti) lasting till 14 July, is known as Uttarayana (“Uttar” North and “ayan” movement towards). It is also the last day of the month of Maargazhi, which is the ninth month of the lunar calendar. The Bhagawad Gita deems it as an extremely sacred and auspicious time when Lord Krishna manifests himself most tangibly. Bhishma Pitamah in Mahabharata also waited for this period (not day) to leave his body.

Uttarayana is considered to be the holiest half of the year. In Bhagavad Gita, the Lord says, “I am Uttarayana among the Ayanas.”

In chapter 8 shloka 24 Lord Krishna has said “Those who know the Supreme Brahman attain that Supreme by passing away from the world during the influence of the fiery god, in the light, at an auspicious moment of the day, during the fortnight of the waxing moon, or during the six months when the sun travels in the north.”

The earth, farthest from the sun at this point of time, starts its journey towards the sun, thus ending the coldest month of the year (peak winter), Paush, and announcing the start of the month of Magh.

As per “Puranas”, Dakshinayana (the other 6-month period) is the night of the deities whereas Uttarayana is their day.

It’s the time to take a dip in the Ganges at sunrise and at sunset and say good bye to winter foods.

An extremely auspicious day, Lohri marks the sun’s entry in to the ‘Makar Rashi’.  The next day after lohri is Makar Sankranti. One can remember lohri as the last day of winter and maker sankranti as the first day of summer.

The word Sankranti menas “change of direction” and the sun change its direction north words on the day of maker sankranti.

The period, beginning from 14 January (Makar Sankranti) lasting till 14 July, is known as Uttarayana (“Uttar” North and “ayan” movement towards).  It is also the last day of the month of Maargazhi, which is the ninth month of the lunar calendar. The Bhagawad Gita deems it as an extremely sacred and auspicious time when Lord Krishna manifests himself most tangibly.  Bhisham Pitamah in Mahbharata also waited for this period (not day) to relieve his body.  Uttarayana is considered to be the holiest half of the year. In Bhagavad Gita, the Lord says, “I am Uttarayana among the Ayanas.”

In chapter 8 shloka 24 Lord Krishna has said “Those who know the Supreme Brahman attain that Supreme by passing away from the world during the influence of the fiery god, in the light, at an auspicious moment of the day, during the fortnight of the waxing moon, or during the six months when the sun travels in the north.”

The earth, farthest from the sun at this point of time, starts its journey towards the sun, thus ending the coldest month of the year (peak winter), Paush, and announcing the start of the month of Magh.

As per “Puranas” Dakshinayana (The other six months period) is the night of the deities where as Uttarayana is their day.  It’s the time to start a dip in Ganges at sun rise and at sunset and say good bye to winter foods.

Period of Holy Baths (Makar Sankranti to Maha Shivaratri)

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Vitamin D deficiency causes severe bone loss in adults across northern India despite abundant sunlight in the region. The factors are inadequate exposure to sunlight and poor nutrition. The resultant disease is Osteomalacia, the loss of calcium from bones brought about by vitamin D deficiency. It can lead to life threatening emergencies in young adults. The examples are acute respiratory failure caused by a grossly deformed thoracic cage resulting from advanced bone loss in the spine and thoracic cage and pregnant women with poor intake of calcium and excessive demand leading to bone pains. Over 50% of healthy people surveyed in one of Delhi’s study by Dr Ambrish Mithal showed poor vitamin D levels.

The sun is the main source of Vitamin D. Human body make Vitamin D when sunlight touches the bare skin. However, too much exposure to direct sunlight Read more