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Dr K K Aggarwal

Science behind regrets

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In a US–based study, dying people were asked about their regrets, if any. The top five regrets were:

  1. I wish I had the courage to live a life I wanted to live and not what others expected me to live.
  2. I wish I had worked harder.
  3. I wish I had the courage to express my feelings.
  4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.
  5. I wish I had let myself to be happier.

Regrets are always based on suppression of emotions or non–fulfillment of desires and needs. These need-based desires can be at the level of physical body, mind, intellect, ego or the soul. Therefore, regrets can be at any of these levels.

I did a survey of 15 of my patients and asked them a simple question that if they come to know that they are going to die in next 24 hours, what would be their biggest regret.

Only one of them, a doctor said that she would have no regrets.

Only one person expressed a physical regret and that was from a Yoga expert who said that her regret was not getting married till that day.

Mental regrets were two.

  1. A state trading businessman said, “I wish I could have taken care of my parents.”
  2. A homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have given more time to my family.”

Intellectual regrets were three.

  1. A lawyer said, “I wish I could have become something in life.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have helped more people.”
  3. A retired revenue inspector said, “I wish I had married off my younger child.”

Egoistic regrets were two.

  1. One fashion designer said, “I wish I could have become a singer.”
  2. A housewife said, “I wish I could have become a dietician.”

Spiritual regrets were six.

  1. A Consultant Government Liaison officer said, “I wish I could have made my family members happy.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have meditated more.”
  3. A Homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my family.”
  4. A reception executive said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my parents.”
  5. An entertainment CEO said, “I wish I could have taken my parents for a pilgrimage.”
  6. A fashion designer said, “I wish I could have worked more for the animals.”

In a very popular and successful movie, Kal Ho Na Ho, the hero was to die in the next 40 days. When asked to remember the days of his life, he could not remember 20 ecstatic instances in life.

This is what happens with each one of us where we waste all our days and cannot remember more than 50 or even 20 of such instances. If we are given 40 days to live and if we live every day ecstatically, we can get inner happiness. Therefore, we should learn to live in the present instead of having a habit of postponing everything we do.

We should learn to prioritize our work and do difficult work first or else we would be in a state of constant worry till that work is over.

I teach my patients that they should practice confession exercise and one confession is to talk about your regrets and take them as challenge and finish before the next Tuesday. When working, there are three things which are to be remembered – passion, profession and fashion. Profession is at the level of mind, ego and spirit.

We should convert our profession in such a manner that it is fashionable and passionate. Passion means working from the heart and profession means working from mind and intellect and fashion means working the same at the level of ego which is based on show–off.(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Temple enhances soul to soul connectivity

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A Temple, Gurudwara or a Masjid can also be understood by studying the concept of computer internet-based virtual e-communication.

The physical body can be compared to that of a computer hardware and the subtle body with three application softwares of a computer namely, Mind (Microsoft Word), Intellect (Excel) and Ego (Power Point).

These three application softwares are controlled by Chitta or the life force, which is a combination of Prana, Tejas and Ojas (or Operational Software in computer language). Without chitta or operational software, the body cannot function. A dead person (dead computer) will be devoid of chitta (operational software).

The application and operation softwares in turn are controlled by the soul, which is nothing but energized information or soul. This energized information in the body in Vedic language is called Shiva Shakti, where Shiva represents information and Shakti represents the energy or the power of the software.

This energized information or the soul can be equated to a very high speed internet connection www.god.com-drkkaggarwal for me. For another person, for example, Mr B S Sokhi, the soul communication will be www.god.com-bssokhi.

Both these souls will be communicated to a virtual internet called GOD or SPIRIT. The same can be represented as www.GOD.com and in this virtual consciousness or GOD, these pages will be similar to Facebook pages for individual members. For example, there will be a page called www.GOD.com-drkkaggarwal and another page called www.GOD.com-bssokhi.

Whatever you do is converted into a virtual memory and a copy of that is saved in both www.god.com and www.GOD.com. This way the phrase that GOD is watching each and every action can be explained.

Increasing one’s connectivity with GOD is like increasing the bandwidth of a computer internet. The same can be done in the body by controlling the mind, intellect and ego and by learning the process of Meditation, Pranayama and living a parasympathetic lifestyle.

Mobile towers or satellites are used to enhance connectivity for computers.

The natural towers in the body are called Chakras or the automatic ganglion. They behave like internal towers and intensify our communication with the soul and the spirit. In the outside world, this work is done by a Temple, Gurudwara or a Masjid.

According to the Vedic philosophy, we should practice focusing on our Chakras or ganglions regularly to increase our internal communication.

With collective consciousness of people (more than 1% of the population) focusing on a particular area or a stone, it acquires the powers of a communication tower or satellite.

A stone that becomes a focus of the collective consciousness of the people becomes a GOD ideal and the process is called Pratishthan.

A Mandir, Gurudwara or a Masjid, where the collective consciousness of the people gets focused, becomes a source of increase connectivity between the body and the soul. A person sitting in such an environment therefore, finds himself more near God, Allah or Wahe Guru.

The story of Hiranyakashyap where God comes out of the pillar on the request of the Prahlad and kills Hiranyakashyap basically proves that even the impossible is possible if you focus your concentration on the object of concentration and give preference to object of concentration over other thoughts.

This explains how in the past the collective consciousness of the people could bring rains or light candles or diyas. This also forms the basis of collective prayer.

The collective thoughts of the people get posted to the virtual Mandir, Gurudwara and Masjid and when a critical mass of 1% is reached, everyone will start working towards what is taught.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Why do we ring the bell in a temple?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The vibrations of the ringing bell also produce the auspicious primordial sound ‘Om’, thus creating a connection between the deity and the mind. As we start the daily ritualistic worship (pooja), we ring the bell, chanting:

Aagamaarthamtu devaanaam

gamanaarthamtu rakshasaam

Kurve ghantaaravam tatra

devataahvaahna lakshanam

“I ring this bell indicating the invocation of divinity, So that virtuous and noble forces enter (my home and heart); And the demonic and evil forces From within and without, depart.”

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

Spiritual Prescriptions – Controlling the Inner Noise

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Yoga Sutras of Patanjali define yoga as restraint of the mental states (Chapter 1.2). In the state of total restraint, the mind is devoid of any external object and is in its true self or the consciousness. To control the mind many Vedic scholars have given their own formulas.

Being in touch with one’s own consciousness requires restraining of the mind, intellect and ego on one hand and the triad of rajas, tamas and satwa on the other hand. Every action leads to a memory, which in turn leads to a desire and with this a vicious cycle starts.

The mental turmoil of thoughts can be equated to the internal noise and the external desires and objects to an external noise.

The process of withdrawing from the external noise with an aim to start a journey inwards the silent field of awareness bypassing the internal noise is called pratihara by Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. It involves living in a satwik atmosphere based on the dos and don’ts learnt over a period of time or as told by the scriptures.

To control inner noise based thoughts we either need to neutralize negative thoughts by cultivating opposite thoughts or kill the origin of negative thoughts.

Not allowing thoughts to occur has been one of the strategies mentioned by the scholars. One of them has been neti–neti by Yagnayakya.

The other method is to pass through these inner thoughts and not get disturbed by it and that is what the process of meditation is. This can be equated to a situation where two people are talking in an atmosphere of loud external noise. For proper communication one will have to concentrate on each other’s voice for long till the external noise ceases to disturb. In meditation, one concentrates on the object of concentration to such an extent that the noisy thoughts cease to bother or exist.

One of the ways mentioned by Adi Shankaracharya in Bhaja Govindam and by Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (Chapter 2.35) is that whenever one is surrounded by evil or negative thoughts one should meditate open the contrary thoughts. For example, if one is feeling greedy, one can think of donating something to somebody. Deepak Chopra in his book Seven Laws of Spiritual Success talks in detail about the importance of giving and sharing. He says you should never visit friends or relations empty handed. You should always carry some gift of nature, which if nothing is available can be a simple smile, compliment or a flower. By repeatedly indulging into positive behavior and thoughts, you can reduce the internal noise, which helps in making the process of meditation or conscious living a simpler one.

Washing out negative thoughts is another way mentioned by many Vedic scholars. Three minutes writing is one such exercise which anybody can do. Just before sleep anybody can do three minutes writing where you can write down all your emotions and then discard the paper. Another exercise is to reward or punish oneself at bed time for the activities done during the day by either patting or slapping yourself.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

More about Debts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Hindu scriptures have talked three types of rin (debts): Dev rin, Pitra rin and Rishi rin.God or the devtas gave us the consciousness, parents gave us our body and teachers gave us the knowledge or intellect.In Vedic language, our body is a mix of mind, body and soul which can be equated to three rins of mind (teachers), body (parents) and soul (Rishi & Gods). In computer language, this can be equated to operational software (God), application software (teachers) and computer hardware (parents).

(Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views)

Why do we Ring the Bell in a Temple?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The vibrations of the ringing bell also produce the auspicious primordial sound ‘Om’, thus creating a connection between the deity and the mind. As we start the daily ritualistic worship (pooja), we ring the bell, chanting:

Aagamaarthamtu devaanaamgamanaarthamtu rakshasaamKurve ghantaaravam tatradevataahvaahna lakshanam

“I ring this bell indicating the invocation of divinity, So that virtuous and noble forces enter (my home and heart); And the demonic and evil forces from within and without, depart.”

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

If you hate somebody, it means you have a lot of time to waste

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If you hate somebody, it only means that you have lot of meaningless time to spare. If you are busy and live in the present, you cannot think of the past or the future.

There is a well-known saying in Vedanta that you cannot hate strangers, you only can hate somebody whom you loved and withdrawal of love is what hatred is.

Love and hate, therefore, are the two sides of the same coin. You cannot have both. You need to make an effort to hate somebody but love is always spontaneous. It is not true that if you love somebody, it means that you have a lot of time to spare. Love comes from the heart and not from the mind or the intellect.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Confession

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Confession is one of the many ways of detoxifying the mind. It has its roots in Hindu mythology but today it is mainly practiced in Christianity as a ritual, where the individual confesses to the Bishop without disclosing his or her identity.In Hindu mythology, confession is a routine spiritual practice. People can confess to their Guru, to their God in the temple or their mentor. Confession can also be done to a plant (Peepal tree), an animal (dog or a cat) or birds. It is a common saying that taking a dip in Yamuna or Ganga removes all your sins. The dip in water involves a ritual of confessing guilt every time we make a dip.Giving food to birds is also a way of confession where one does a confession with each offering. The easiest way to confess is 3 minutes of free writing, which can be done every night. Tear off the paper after writing. This involves writing from the heart and not giving time to the mind to think.Earlier people used to confess and de–stress their emotions by writing in a diary or making a folder in the computer and writing.However, the best confession is to meditate, which is equivalent to reformatting the hard disk and removing viruses and corrupt files from our body computer. Meditating with intent to get rid of guilt washes them over a period of time.Confession involves the process of forgiving and forgetting. Forgiving is at the level of mind and forgetting is at the level of heart.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

The three types of Debts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Hindu scriptures have talked about three types of Hrin (debts): Dev Hrin, Pitra Hrin and Rishi Hrin.

God or the devtas gave us the consciousness, parents gave us our body and teachers gave us the knowledge or intellect. In Vedic language, our body is a mix of mind, body and soul, which can be equated to three Hrins of mind (teachers), body (parents) and soul (Rishi & Gods). In computer language, this can be equated to operational software (God), application software (teachers) and computer hardware (parents).

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

How to Finish Your Pending Work?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • This involves principles of time management and some Vedic principles.
  • The first thing to do is to make a checklist of all the pending work by writing it down and re–categorizing them depending upon the urgency and importance.
  • Pending work can be classified under following four sections:
    • Urgent and important: Should be done immediately.
    • Important but not urgent: Should be scheduled as per the time available
    • Not important and not urgent: One should learn to say no and dump it
    • Urgent but not important: This work should be delegated to others.
  • Urgency of the work is decided by the deadlines available.
  • The importance of the work is decided by directing the result of the work to the mind, body or the soul. One should see whether the result of the work gives pleasure to the body, mind or the soul. The one which is giving pleasure to the soul will be free of fear or guilt.
  • When choosing files between simple or difficult, choose the difficult first so that you do not carry them back home in the mind. In terms of importance, difficult files are more important than simple files.
  • When choosing right versus convenient action, give priority to the right action and not the convenient action.
  • Delegation of work – team work is very important.
  • When deadlines are available, it is always better not to keep the work just near the deadlines.
  • Anticipate delay and keep time for unforeseen movements.
  • Work is work and not something personal.
  • Always remember the spiritual principle that you get what you deserve and not what you desire. So never get linked to the results of your actions.
  • Yoga, pranayama, afternoon naps and meditation help to prioritize your work.
  • Follow the principles of creativity and learn to give breaks in between the work so that the mind is relaxed and can take soul boosting decisions.
  • Remember, Yudhishthir never kept anything pending for tomorrow. In this way you can have a fearless, undisturbed sleep.
  • Organizing your pending list always helps.
  • Do not waste time on learning material on which you are already an expert.
  • Take advantage of down time. If you find free time in your routine, then convert it into a creative time so that you can plan strategies or do something new.
  • Always get up at the same time and never disturb your sleep time.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Controlling the Inner Noise

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Controlling the Inner Noise

Yoga Sutras of Patanjali define yoga as restraint of the mental states (Chapter 1.2). In the state of total restraint, the mind is devoid of any external object and is in its true self or the consciousness. To control the mind many Vedic scholars have given their own formulas.  Being in touch with one’s own consciousness requires restraining of the mind, intellect and ego on one hand and the triad of rajas, tamas and satwa on the other hand. Every action leads to a memory, which in turn leads to a desire and with this a vicious cycle starts.  The mental turmoil of thoughts can be equated to the internal noise and the external desires and objects to an external noise.  The process of withdrawing from the external noise with an aim to start a journey inwards the silent field of awareness bypassing the internal noise is called pratihara by Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. It involves living in a satwik atmosphere based on the dos and don’ts learnt over a period of time or as told by the scriptures.  To control the inner noise, we either need to neutralize negative thoughts by cultivating opposite thoughts or kill the origin of negative thoughts.  Not allowing thoughts to occur has been one of the strategies mentioned by the scholars. One of them has been neti–neti by Yajnavalkya.  The other method is to pass through these inner thoughts and not get disturbed by it and that is what the process of meditation is. This can be equated to a situation where two people are talking in an atmosphere of loud external noise. For proper communication one will have to concentrate on each other’s voice for long till the external noise ceases to disturb. In meditation, one concentrates on the object of concentration to such an extent that the noisy thoughts cease to bother or exist. One of the ways mentioned by Adi Shankaracharya in Bhaja Govindam and by Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (Chapter 2.35) is that whenever one is surrounded by evil or negative thoughts one should think contrary thoughts. For example, if one is feeling greedy, one can think of donating something to somebody. Deepak Chopra in his book “The Seven Laws of Spiritual Success” talks in detail about the importance of giving and sharing. He says you should never visit friends or relations empty handed. You should always carry some gift of nature, which if nothing is available can be a simple smile, compliment or a flower. By repeatedly indulging into positive behavior and thoughts, you can reduce the internal noise, which helps in making the process of meditation or conscious living a simpler one.  Washing out negative thoughts is another way mentioned by many Vedic scholars. Three minutes writing is one such exercise which anybody can do. Before going to bed, take three minutes to write down all your emotions and then discard the paper. Another exercise is to reward or punish oneself at bed time for the activities done during the day by either patting or slapping yourself.

Temple enhances soul to soul connectivity

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Temple enhances soul to soul connectivity

A Temple, Gurudwara or a Masjid can also be understood by studying the concept of computer internet-based virtual e-communication.

The physical body can be compared to that of a computer hardware and the subtle body with three application softwares of a computer namely, Mind (Microsoft Word), Intellect (Excel) and Ego (Power Point).

These three application softwares are controlled by Chitta or the life force, which is a combination of PranaTejas and Ojas (or Operational Software in computer language). Without chitta or operational software, the body cannot function. A dead person (dead computer) will be devoid of chitta (operational software).

The application and operation softwares in turn are controlled by the soul, which is nothing but energized information or soul. This energized information in the body in Vedic language is called Shiva Shakti, where Shiva represents information and Shakti represents the energy or the power of the software.

This energized information or the soul can be equated to a very high speed internet connection www.god.com-drkkaggarwal for me. For another person, for example, Mr B S Sokhi, the soul communication will be www.god.com-bssokhi.

Both these souls will be communicated to a virtual internet called GOD or SPIRIT. The same can be represented as www.GOD.com and in this virtual consciousness or GOD, these pages will be similar to Facebook pages for individual members. For example, there will be a page called www.GOD.com-drkkaggarwal and another page called www.GOD.com-bssokhi.

Whatever you do is converted into a virtual memory and a copy of that is saved in both www.god.com and www.GOD.com. This way the phrase that GOD is watching each and every action can be explained.

Increasing one’s connectivity with GOD is like increasing the bandwidth of a computer internet. The same can be done in the body by controlling the mind, intellect and ego and by learning the process of Meditation, Pranayama and living a parasympathetic lifestyle.

Mobile towers or satellites are used to enhance connectivity for computers.

The natural towers in the body are called Chakras or the automatic ganglion. They behave like internal towers and intensify our communication with the soul and the spirit. In the outside world, this work is done by a Temple, Gurudwara or a Masjid.

According to the Vedic philosophy, we should practice focusing on our Chakras or ganglions regularly to increase our internal communication.

With collective consciousness of people (more than 1% of the population) focusing on a particular area or a stone, it acquires the powers of a communication tower or satellite.

A stone that becomes a focus of the collective consciousness of the people becomes a GOD ideal and the process is called Pratishthan.

A Mandir, Gurudwara or a Masjid, where the collective consciousness of the people gets focused, becomes a source of increase connectivity between the body and the soul. A person sitting in such an environment therefore, finds himself more near God, Allah or Wahe Guru.

The story of Hiranyakashyap where God comes out of the pillar on the request of the Prahlad and kills Hiranyakashyap basically proves that even the impossible is possible if you focus your concentration on the object of concentration and give preference to object of concentration over other thoughts.

This explains how in the past the collective consciousness of the people could bring rains or light candles or diyas. This also forms the basis of collective prayer.

The collective thoughts of the people get posted to the virtual Mandir, Gurudwara and Masjid and when a critical mass of 1% is reached, everyone will start working towards what is taught.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

 

 

Debts in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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It is said that there are three debts, which everybody has to pay in his or her lifetime. In Vedic language, they are called Dev Rin, Pitra Rin and Rishi Rin.
In medical language, the body consists of soul, physical body, mind, intellect and ego. The soul is given to us by God or Devtas (Dev Rin), the physical body by our parents (Pitra Rin) and the mind, intellect and ego by our Gurus (Rishi Rin).
In terms of computer language, if I see my body as a computer, then my body as a computer is made by my parents; operating software and my inner internet represent the soul or consciousness given by the Devtas and the application softwares i.e. Word, Excel and Power point, which we learn over a period of time are given to us by our Gurus. Therefore, we have to pay all these three debts while we are still alive.
(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Science behind regrets (Dr KK Aggarwal)

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In a US–based study, dying people were asked about their regrets, if any. The top five regrets were: 1. I wish I had the courage to live a life I wanted to live and not what others expected me to live. 2. I wish I had worked harder. 3. I wish I had the courage to express my feelings. 4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. 5. I wish I had let myself be happier. Regrets are always based on suppression of emotions or non–fulfillment of desires and needs. These need-based desires can be at the level of physical body, mind, intellect, ego or the soul. Therefore, regrets can be at any of these levels. I did a survey of 15 of my patients and asked them a simple question that if they come to know that they are going to die in next 24 hours, what would be their biggest regret. Only one of them, a doctor said that she would have no regrets. Only one person expressed a physical regret and that was from a Yoga expert who said that her regret was not getting married till that day. Mental regrets were two. 1. A state trading businessman said, “I wish I could have taken care of my parents.” 2. A homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have given more time to my family.” Intellectual regrets were three. 1. A lawyer said, “I wish I could have become something in life.” 2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have helped more people.” 3. A retired revenue inspector said, “I wish I had married off my younger child.” Egoistic regrets were two. 1. One fashion designer said, “I wish I could have become a singer.” 2. A housewife said, “I wish I could have become a dietician.” Spiritual regrets were six. 1. A Consultant Government Liaison officer said, “I wish I could have made my family members happy.” 2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have meditated more.” 3. A Homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my family.” 4. A reception executive said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my parents.” 5. An entertainment CEO said, “I wish I could have taken my parents for a pilgrimage.” 6. A fashion designer said, “I wish I could have worked more for the animals.” In a very popular and successful movie, Kal Ho Na Ho, the hero was to die in the next 40 days. When asked to remember the days of his life, he could not remember 20 ecstatic instances in life. This is what happens with each one of us where we waste all our days and cannot remember more than 50 or even 20 of such instances. If we are given 40 days to live and if we live every day ecstatically, we can get inner happiness. Therefore, we should learn to live in the present instead of having a habit of postponing everything we do. We should learn to prioritize our work and do difficult work first or else we would be in a state of constant worry till that work is over. I teach my patients that they should practice confession exercise and one confession is to talk about your regrets and take them as challenge and finish before the next Tuesday. When working, there are three things which are to be remembered – passion, profession and fashion. Profession is at the level of mind, ego and spirit. We should convert our profession in such a manner that it is fashionable and passionate. Passion means working from the heart and profession means working from mind and intellect and fashion means working the same at the level of ego which is based on show–off. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own

Debts in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Debts in Mythology

It is said that there are three debts which everybody has to pay in his or her lifetime. In Vedic language, they are called Dev Rin, Pitra Rin and Rishi Rin. In medical language, the body consists of soul, physical body, mind, intellect and ego. The soul is given to us by God or Devtas (Dev Rin), the physical body by our parents (Pitra Rin) and the mind, intellect and ego by our Gurus (Rishi Rin). In terms of computer language, if I see my body as a computer, then my body as a computer is made by my parents; operating software and my inner internet represent the soul or consciousness given by the Devtas and the application softwares i.e. Word, Excel and Power point, which we learn over a period of time are given to us by our Gurus. Therefore, we have to pay all these three debts while we are still alive.