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Dr K K Aggarwal

Tips to prevent water-borne diseases this monsoon:

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Tips to prevent water-borne diseases this monsoon:

  • Drink only filtered/boiled water.
  • Store water in a clean container.
  • Water jars/containers should be washed daily.
  • Always wash hands before and after preparing food and eating. Likewise, children should be educated about the importance of washing their hands effectively and regularly.
  • It is mandatory to wash one’s hands with soaps or use hand sanitizers after using a washroom, changing a childs diaper, or after visiting unclean and infection-prone areas, such as public washrooms, hospitals, etc.
  • Consume warm and home cooked foods and avoid consuming street food.
  • Wash food thoroughly before cooking.
  • Always keep foods/beverages covered.
  • Make sure that the pipes and tanks that supply water to your house are properly maintained and clean.
  • Travelers should only drink bottled water and avoid uncooked food.
  • People suffering from water-borne diseases should not go to work until fully recovered to avoid spreading the infection.
  • Avoid using ice made from tap water.
  • Freezing does not kill the organisms that cause diarrhea. Ice in drinks is not safe unless it has been made from adequately boiled or filtered water.
  • Alcohol does not sterilize water or the ice. Mixed drinks may still be contaminated.
  • Hot tea and coffee are the best alternates to boiled water.
  • Drink only filtered/boiled water.
  • Store water in a clean container.
  • Water jars/containers should be washed daily.
  • Always wash hands before and after preparing food and eating. Likewise, children should be educated about the importance of washing their hands effectively and regularly.
  • It is mandatory to wash one’s hands with soaps or use hand sanitizers after using a washroom, changing a childs diaper, or after visiting unclean and infection-prone areas, such as public washrooms, hospitals, etc.
  • Consume warm and home cooked foods and avoid consuming street food.
  • Wash food thoroughly before cooking.
  • Always keep foods/beverages covered.
  • Make sure that the pipes and tanks that supply water to your house are properly maintained and clean.
  • Travelers should only drink bottled water and avoid uncooked food.
  • People suffering from water-borne diseases should not go to work until fully recovered to avoid spreading the infection.
  • Avoid using ice made from tap water.
  • Freezing does not kill the organisms that cause diarrhea. Ice in drinks is not safe unless it has been made from adequately boiled or filtered water.
  • Alcohol does not sterilize water or the ice. Mixed drinks may still be contaminated.
  • Hot tea and coffee are the best alternates to boiled water.

Monsoon and Dengue on the Door

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Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Monsoon and Dengue on the Door

Bed netting is of little use since the dengue mosquitoes are most active during the daytime.

Remaining in well-screened or air-conditioned buildings during the day can reduce the risk of exposure. When outside during the day, one should wear clothing that reduces the amount of exposed skin and should use an effective mosquito repellent, such as N, N-diethyl-metatoluamide (DEET).

Because dramatic plasma leakage can develop suddenly, substantial attention has been placed upon the early identification of patients at higher risk for shock and other complications. The following clinical features are of help in this regard.

Duration of illness: The period of maximum risk for shock is between the third and seventh day of illness. This tends to coincide with resolution of fever. Plasma leakage generally first becomes evident between 24 hours before and 24 hours after fever is over.

Alarm signs: Severe abdominal pain, persistent vomiting, abrupt change from fever to hypothermia, or abnormal mental status, such as disorientation, are noted in a minority of patients.

Hematocrit: An elevation of the hematocrit is an indication that plasma leakage has already occurred and that fluid repletion is urgently required.

Platelet count: Severe thrombocytopenia (<100,000/mm3) is one of the clinical criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever and usually precedes overt plasma leakage.

Serum aspartate transaminase (SGOT): Mild elevations in serum transaminases are common in both dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. However, levels are significantly higher in patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever, and elevated SGOT levels are noted earlier in illness.

Patients with suspected dengue who do not have any of the above indicators can be safely managed as outpatients as long as close clinical observation is assured. Daily outpatient visits may be needed to permit serial assessment of blood pressure, hematocrit, and platelet count.

A patient should be hospitalized when:

  • Blood pressure <90/60 mmHg
  • Hematocrit >50 percent
  • Platelet count <50,000/mm3
  • Evidence of bleeding other than petechiae