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Dr K K Aggarwal

Wahans (Vehicles) in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In mythology, the negative tendency of a man is symbolized with the animal nature. Gods in Indian mythology are symbolized as living a positive behavior. Every God has been given a vehicle or Wahan. Both God and the Wahan symbolize how to live a positive life and how to control the animal tendencies. Following are a few examples:

  1. Lord Ganesha rides a mouse. Mouse in mythology is symbolized with greed and Ganesha as the one who removes obstacles. The spiritual meaning behind both is – one should learn to control greed to tackle obstacles in life.
  2. Lord Shiva rides Nandi. The bull symbolizes uncontrolled sexual desires and the duo signifies that to learn meditation, one needs to control sexual desires first.
  3. Saraswati (the goddess of knowledge) sitting on a swan symbolizes that to acquire knowledge one must learn the power of discrimination or vivek. A swan can drink milk and leave water from a mixture of milk and water.
  4. Indra (the one who has complete control over the intellect) riding on the elephant Airavat symbolizes that for its development, the intellect (Indra) requires control over masti and madness (elephant).
  5. Durga (the perfect woman) riding a lion symbolizes that to become a perfect woman, she must learn to control agitation or aggression (lion).
  6. Lakshmi (wealth) riding an owl symbolizes that to earn righteously, one must learn to control owl-like properties within us, which is not to be fooled.
  7. Lord Vishnu (the doer) riding the eagle or garuda (Eagles are opportunistic predators, which means, they eat almost anything they can find) means controlling your desires to eat an unbalanced diet.
  8. Krishna riding five horses means one needs to control our five senses.
  9. Kartikeya riding a peacock symbolizes that one should learn to control one’s pride (vanity) or ego.
  10. The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides Mesha, a ram. Kubera, the god of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Goat also signifies uncontrolled sexual desires but lesser than the bull.
  11. Yamraj rides a buffalo, which is known for its rampant destruction. Lord Yama or Yamraj is referred to as the God of death, lord of justice, Dharma Raja. One can do justice only if one has control over anger and aggressive behavior.

In mythology, apart from Wahans, animals are also shown to be sacrificed, which means to kill the animal tendency within ourselves. In Kali Pooja, a buffalo is sacrificed, which again means that in extreme situations, you may need to kill your ego or anger.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Wahans (Vehicles) In Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Health Care - Ask Dr KK | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Wahans (Vehicles) In Mythology

In mythological era, the negative tendency of a man is symbolized with the animal nature. Gods in Indian mythology have been symbolized as living a positive behavior. Every God has been given a vehicle or Wahan. Both God and the Wahan symbolized how to live a positive life and how to control the animal tendencies.

Following are a few examples:

  • Lord Ganesha rides a Mouse. Mouse in mythology is symbolized with greed and Ganesha with one who removes obstacles. The spiritual meaning behind the two is “one should learn to control greed to tackle obstacles in life”.
  • Lord Shiva riding Nandi (Bull symbolizes uncontrolled sexual desires) and the duo signifies that to learn meditation, one needs to control sexual desires first.
  • Saraswati (the Goddesses of knowledge) sitting on Swan symbolizes that to acquire knowledge one must learn to control the power of discrimination or Vivek. Swan can drink milk and leave water from a mixture of milk and water.
  • Indra (the one who has a complete control over the intellect) riding on the elephant Airavat symbolizes that development of intellect (Indra) requires control over Masti and madness (elephant).
  • Durga (the perfect woman) riding a lion symbolizes that to become a perfect woman, one must learn to control her agitation or aggression (lion).
  • Lakshmi (wealth) riding an owl symbolizes that to earn righteously, one must learn to control owl-like properties within us, which is not to get befooled.
  • Lord Vishnu (the doer) riding eagle or Garuda (Eagles are opportunistic predators which means they eat almost anything they can find) means controlling your desires to eat unbalanced meals.
  • Krishna riding five horses means one needs to control our five senses.
  • Kartikeya riding on Peacock symbolizes that should learn to control one’s pride (vanity) or ego.
  • The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides Mesha – a ram. Kubera, the God of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Goat also signifies uncontrolled sexual desires but lesser than the bull.
  • Yamraj rides a buffalo, which is known for its rampant destruction. Lord Yama or Yamraja is referred to as the God of death, twin brother, lord of justice, Dharma Raja. One can do justice only if one has a control over anger and aggressive behavior.

Debts in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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It is said that there are three debts which everybody has to pay in his or her lifetime. In Vedic language, they are called Dev Rin, Pitra Rin and Rishi Rin.

In medical language, the body consists of soul, physical body, mind, intellect and ego. The soul is given to us by God or Devtas (Dev Rin), the physical body by our parents (Pitra Rin) and the mind, intellect and ego by our Gurus (Rishi Rin).

In terms of computer language, if I see my body as a computer, then my body as a computer is made by my parents; operating software and my inner internet represent the soul or consciousness given by the Devtas and the application softwares i.e. Word, Excel and Power point, which we learn over a period of time are given to us by our Gurus. Therefore, we have to pay all these three debts while we are still alive.

Wahans (Vehicles) in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Wahans (Vehicles) in Mythology

In mythology, the negative tendency of a man is symbolized with the animal nature. Gods in Indian mythology are symbolized as living a positive behavior. Every God has been given a vehicle or Wahan. Both God and the Wahan symbolized how to live a positive life and how to control the animal tendencies. Following are a few examples.

  1. Lord Ganesha rides a Mouse. Mouse in mythology is symbolized with greed and Ganesha as the one who removes obstacles. The spiritual meaning behind both is – one should learn to control greed to tackle obstacles in life.
  2. Lord Shiva rides Nandi. The bull symbolizes uncontrolled sexual desires and the duo signifies that to learn meditation, one needs to control sexual desires first.
  3. Saraswati (the Goddess of knowledge) sitting on a swan symbolizes that to acquire knowledge one must learn to control the power of discrimination or vivek. A swan can drink milk and leave water from a mixture of milk and water.
  4. Indra (the one who has a complete control over the intellect) riding on the elephant Airavat symbolizes that for its development the intellect (Indra) requires control over masti and madness (elephant).
  5. Durga (the perfect woman) riding a lion symbolizes that to become a perfect woman, she must learn to control agitation or aggression (lion).
  6. Lakshmi (wealth) riding an owl symbolizes that to earn righteously, one must learn to control owl-like properties within us, which is not to get befooled.
  7. Lord Vishnu (the doer) riding the eagle or Garuda (Eagles are opportunistic predators which means they eat almost anything they can find) means controlling your desires to eat an unbalanced diet.
  8. Krishna riding five horses means one need to control our five senses.
  9. Kartikeya riding a peacock symbolizes that one should learn to control one’s pride (vanity) or ego.
  10. The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides Mesha, a ram. Kubera, the god of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Goat also signifies uncontrolled sexual desires but lesser than the bull.
  11. Yamraj rides a buffalo, which is known for its rampant destruction. Lord Yama or Yamraja is referred to as the God of death, twin brother, lord of justice, Dharma Raja. One can do justice only if one has a control over anger and aggressive behavior.

In mythology, apart from Wahans, animals are also shown to be sacrificed, which means to kill the animal tendency within ourselves. In Kali Pooja, a buffalo is sacrificed, which again means that in extreme situations, you may need to kill your ego or anger.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Wahans (Vehicles) in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Wahans (Vehicles) in Mythology

In mythology, the negative tendency of a man is symbolized with the animal nature. Gods in Indian mythology are symbolized as living a positive behavior. Every God has been given a vehicle or Wahan. Both God and the Wahan symbolized how to live a positive life and how to control the animal tendencies. Following are a few examples.

  1. Lord Ganesha rides a Mouse. Mouse in mythology is symbolized with greed and Ganesha as the one who removes obstacles. The spiritual meaning behind both is – one should learn to control greed to tackle obstacles in life.
  2. Lord Shiva rides Nandi. The bull symbolizes uncontrolled sexual desires and the duo signifies that to learn meditation, one needs to control sexual desires first.
  3. Saraswati (the Goddess of knowledge) sitting on a swan symbolizes that to acquire knowledge one must learn to control the power of discrimination or vivek. A swan can drink milk and leave water from a mixture of milk and water.
  4. Indra (the one who has a complete control over the intellect) riding on the elephant Airavat symbolizes that for its development the intellect (Indra) requires control over masti and madness (elephant).
  5. Durga (the perfect woman) riding a lion symbolizes that to become a perfect woman, she must learn to control agitation or aggression (lion).
  6. Lakshmi (wealth) riding an owl symbolizes that to earn righteously, one must learn to control owl-like properties within us, which is not to get befooled.
  7. Lord Vishnu (the doer) riding the eagle or Garuda (Eagles are opportunistic predators which means they eat almost anything they can find) means controlling your desires to eat an unbalanced diet.
  8. Krishna riding five horses means one need to control our five senses.
  9. Kartikeya riding a peacock symbolizes that one should learn to control one’s pride (vanity) or ego.
  10. The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides Mesha, a ram. Kubera, the god of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Goat also signifies uncontrolled sexual desires but lesser than the bull.
  11. Yamraj rides a buffalo, which is known for its rampant destruction. Lord Yama or Yamraja is referred to as the God of death, twin brother, lord of justice, Dharma Raja. One can do justice only if one has a control over anger and aggressive behavior.

In mythology, apart from Wahans, animals are also shown to be sacrificed, which means to kill the animal tendency within ourselves. In Kali Pooja, a buffalo is sacrificed, which again means that in extreme situations, you may need to kill your ego or anger.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Ego in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Ego in Mythology

For spirituality, one needs to control two things, firstly, lust and lastly, the ego. In Kaama, Krodha, Lobha, Moha and Ahankara, ego and lust both are slow poisons and do not allow one to be spiritual healthy. There are many examples of how to control ego in mythology. Fundamentally, it is said that one should learn to kill ego of oneself and never hurt the ego of others.

Ego in Ramayana is equated to Ravana and in Krishna’s era to Kans. One should learn to kills the ego. In Ramayana, Kumbhkarana is Tamas killed by the self i.e. Rama, Meghnath is Rajas and is killed by the mind i.e. Lakshman and ego, the Ravana, is killed again by self i.e. Rama. In Krishna’s Yuga Kans is killed by consciousness or Lord Krishna.

Mythology also teaches us to keep our ego under control.

  1. The door of any temple is always low in height so that nobody can enter without bending. Bending is sign of humility. Most temples have caves which have the same significance. Older the temple longer will be the cave and smaller will be the entry gate.
  2. Ego in mythology is depicted by Sheshnaaga or Cobra snake with its hood directed inwards indicating keeping your ego under control. The Sheshnaaga over Vishnu when he is resting indicates the same. In Krishna’s birth also, the snake represents controlled ego and protects Krishna when Vasu dev takes him out in the rain.
  3. Lord Shiva is also shown wearing a snake in his neck with hood directed inwards. Shiva is also said to have a blue neck or Neelkanth indicating that to control anger one should neutralize the anger continuously (matted hairs) with cool mind ( Moon) using positive flow of thoughts(ganga) with ego controlled ( naag)
  4. In Hanuman ki Lanka Yatra, Sursa snake is handled by Hanuman with humility. Sursa, the ego, went on increasing in size when Hanuman increases his size.
  5. No Hindu marriage is complete without Varmala, which again indicates the need to bow in front of each other.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Wahans (Vehicles) in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Wahans (Vehicles) in Mythology

In mythology, the negative tendency of a man is symbolized with the animal nature. Gods in Indian mythology are symbolized as living a positive behavior. Every God has been given a vehicle or Wahan. Both God and the Wahan symbolized how to live a positive life and how to control the animal tendencies. Following are a few examples.

  1. Lord Ganesha rides a Mouse. Mouse in mythology is symbolized with greed and Ganesha as the one who removes obstacles. The spiritual meaning behind both is – one should learn to control greed to tackle obstacles in life.
  2. Lord Shiva rides Nandi. The bull symbolizes uncontrolled sexual desires and the duo signifies that to learn meditation, one needs to control sexual desires first.
  3. Saraswati (the goddesses of knowledge) sitting on a swan symbolizes that to acquire knowledge one must learn to control the power of discrimination or vivek. A swan can drink milk and leave water from a mixture of milk and water.
  4. Indra (the one who has a complete control over the intellect) riding on the elephant Airavat symbolizes that for its development the intellect (Indra) requires control over masti and madness (elephant).
  5. Durga (the perfect woman) riding a lion symbolizes that to become a perfect woman, she must learn to control agitation or aggression (lion).
  6. Lakshmi (wealth) riding an owl symbolizes that to earn righteously, one must learn to control owl-like properties within us, which is not to get befooled.
  7. Lord Vishnu (the doer) riding the eagle or Garuda (Eagles are opportunistic predators which means they eat almost anything they can find) means controlling your desires to eat an unbalanced diet.
  8. Krishna riding five horses means one need to control our five senses.
  9. Kartikeya riding a Peacock symbolizes that one should learn to control one’s pride (vanity) or ego.
  10. The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides Mesha, a ram. Kubera, the god of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Goat also signifies uncontrolled sexual desires but lesser than the bull.
  11. Yamraj rides a buffalo, which is known for its rampant destruction. Lord Yama or Yamraja is referred to as the God of death, twin brother, lord of justice, Dharma Raja. One can do justice only if one has a control over anger and aggressive behavior.

In mythology, apart from Wahans, animals are also shown to be sacrificed, which means to kill the animal tendency within ourselves. In Kali Pooja, a buffalo is sacrificed, which again means that in extreme situations, you may need to kill your ego or anger.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Think Differently in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Is the only spiritual mantra taught in mythology? Here are a few examples

  1. Lord Ganesha with the elephant’s head depicts that one should use their wisdom before taking any decision.
  2. Vishnu’s first incarnation, fish, symbolizes learning to swim in the opposite direction.
  3. Brahma’s five heads mean to use all your five senses before taking any decision.
  4. Shiva’s third eye means to think differently in difficulties.
  5. Ravan’s ten heads mean using your ten senses before taking any decision. But, Ravan used them for negative forces.
  6. Maha Mrityunjaya mantra begins as we worship the three–eyed Shiva.
  7. Gayatri mantra means that one should ask the heart to direct the intellect to take the right decision. The 3H philosophy is linked to the same. The first H is ask the head for options; second H is to ask the heart to choose one of the options and the third H means to order the hand to do the action

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Vahans (Vehicles) In Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Vahans (Vehicles) In Mythology

The negative tendency of a man has been symbolized with the animal nature in mythology. Gods in Indian mythology have been symbolized as living a positive behavior. Every God has been given a vehicle or Vahan. And, both teach us how to live a positive life and control the animal tendencies.

Following are a few examples:

1. Lord Ganesha rides a Mouse. Mouse in mythology is symbolized with greed and Ganesha as the one who removes obstacles. The spiritual meaning behind both is – one should learn to control greed to tackle obstacles in life.

2. Lord Shiva riding Nandi (Bull is symbolized with uncontrolled sexual desires) and the duo signifies that for learning meditation, one needs to control sexual desires first.

3. Saraswati (the goddesses of knowledge) sitting on Swan symbolizes that to acquire knowledge one must learn to control the power of discrimination or Vivek. Swan can drink milk and leave water from a mixture of milk and water.

4. Indra (the one who has a complete control over the intellect) riding on the elephant Airavat symbolizes that intellect (Indra), for its development, requires control over Masti and madness (elephant).

5. Durga (the perfect woman) riding a lion symbolizes that to become a perfect woman, one must learn to control her agitation or aggression (lion).

6. Lakshmi (wealth) riding an owl symbolizes that to earn righteously, one must learn to control Owl like properties within us, which is not to get befooled.

7. Lord Vishnu (the doer) riding eagle or Garuda (Eagles are opportunistic predators which means they eat almost anything they can find) means controlling your desires to eat unbalanced meals.

8. Krishna riding five horses means one need to control our five senses.

9. Kartikeya riding on Peacock symbolizes that should learn to control one’s pride (vanity) or ego.

10. The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides Mesha – a ram. Kubera, the God of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Goat also signifies uncontrolled sexual desires but lesser than the bull.

11. Yamraj rides a buffalo, which is known for its rampant destruction. Lord Yama or Yamraja is referred to as the God of death, twin brother, lord of justice, Dharma Raja. One can do justice only if one has a control over anger and aggressive behavior.

Debts in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Debts in Mythology

It is said that there are three debts which everybody has to pay in his or her lifetime. In Vedic language, they are called Dev Rin, Pitra Rin and Rishi Rin. In medical language, the body consists of soul, physical body, mind, intellect and ego. The soul is given to us by God or Devtas (Dev Rin), the physical body by our parents (Pitra Rin) and the mind, intellect and ego by our Gurus (Rishi Rin). In terms of computer language, if I see my body as a computer, then my body as a computer is made by my parents; operating software and my inner internet represent the soul or consciousness given by the Devtas and the application softwares i.e. Word, Excel and Power point, which we learn over a period of time are given to us by our Gurus. Therefore, we have to pay all these three debts while we are still alive.

Wahans (Vehicles) In Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Wahans (Vehicles) In Mythology

In mythological era, the negative tendency of a man is symbolized with the animal nature. Gods in Indian mythology are symbolized by living a positive behavior. Every God has been given a vehicle or Wahan. Both God and the Wahan symbolize how to live a positive life and how to control the animal tendencies.

Following are a few examples:

• Lord Ganesha rides a Mouse. Mouse in mythology is symbolized with greed and Ganesha with one who removes obstacles. The spiritual meaning behind the two is that one should learn to control greed to tackle obstacles in life.

• Lord Shiva riding Nandi (Bull is symbolized with uncontrolled sexual desires) and the duo signifies that for learning meditation, one needs to control sexual desires first.

• Saraswati (the goddesses of knowledge) sitting on a Swan symbolizes that to acquire knowledge, one must learn to control the power of discrimination or Vivek. Swan can drink milk and leave water from a mixture of milk and water.

• Indra (the one who has a complete control over the intellect) riding on the elephant Airavat symbolizes that intellect (Indra) for its development requires control over Masti and madness (elephant).

• Durga (the perfect woman) riding a lion symbolizes that to become a perfect woman, one must learn to control her agitation or aggression (lion).

• Lakshmi (wealth) riding an owl symbolizes that to earn righteously, one must learn to control Owl like properties within us, which is not to get befooled.

• Lord Vishnu (the doer) riding eagle or Garuda (Eagles are opportunistic predators which means they eat almost anything they can find) means controlling your desires to eat the unbalanced food.

• Krishna riding five horses means one need to control our five senses.

• Kartikeya riding on Peacock symbolizes that one should learn to control one’s pride (vanity) or ego.

• The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides a Mesha (ram). Kubera, the God of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Goat also signifies uncontrolled sexual desires but lesser than the bull.

• Yamraj rides a buffalo, which is known for its rampant destruction. Lord Yama or Yamraja is referred to as the God of death, twin brother, lord of justice, Dharma Raja. One can do justice only if one has a control over anger and aggressive behavior.

In mythology, apart from Wahans, animals are also shown to be sacrificed, which means to kill that animal tendency within ourselves. For example, during exams, you need to kill your goat behavior, which is known to possess excessive sexual desires. You may need to control them throughout the year but during exams you need to kill them. In Kali Pooja, a buffalo is sacrificed, which again means that in extreme situations, you may need to kill your ego or anger.

Sword, Dragger and Discus in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Out of nine forms of Goddess Durga, Chandraghanta, Katyayani and Kalratri are depicted as carrying a sword; Kushmunda, Sidhadhatri as holding a discus and Kalratri as holding additional Dragger (Bhala). All have mythological significance.

The powers of Durga represent feminine powers in all of us. The mythological weapons represent our inherent mental powers to fight to live in this world.

The power of a sword power (non moving astra power) indicates sharp intelligence and relates to straight forward resistance. For example, if you are not happy with somebody’s answer and you stab him on the spot and prove him wrong, is like using your sword power.

On the contrary, the power of a discus (moving shastra power) is your indirect power to make the other person realize his mistake and come back and withdraw.

The dagger or Bhala is in between the two. It is both an astra and a shastra. It is much sharper and more powerful than the sword.

All three of them are three human qualities used by a person in three different situations. For example, there is a theft in your house and you suspect your servant. You can use the sword power and confront him directly till he says yes or you can keep mum for the time being, look for evidence and, if you find it, then you confront him with much more force using your dagger power and, lastly, you can create circumstances by using your discus power and make the servant realize his mistake and come back to you to admit his mistake and seek pardon.

 

Self-esteem in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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For spirituality, one needs to control two things, first, lust and then the ego. Among, Kama, Krodha, Lobha, Moha and Ahankara, ego and lust both are slow poisons and do not allow one to be spiritual healthy. There are many examples of how to control ego in mythology. Fundamentally, it is said that one should learn to kill ego of oneself and never hurt the ego of others.

Ego in Ramayana is equated to Ravana and in Krishna’s era to Kans. One should learn to kill the ego. In Ramayana, Kumbhkarana is Tamas killed by the self i.e. Rama, Meghnath is Rajas and is killed by the mind i.e. Lakshman and ego, the Ravana, is killed again by self i.e. Rama. In Krishna’s Yuga, Kans is killed by consciousness or Lord Krishna. Mythology also teaches us to keep our ego under control.

• The door of any temple is always low in height so that nobody can enter without bending. Bending is sign of humility. Most temples have caves, which have the same significance. Older the temple longer will be the cave and smaller will be the entry gate.

• Ego in mythology is depicted by Sheshnaaga with its hood directed inwards indicating keeping your ego under control. The Sheshnaaga over Vishnu when he is resting indicates the same. In Krishna’s birth also, the snake represents controlled ego and protects Krishna when Vasudev takes him out in the rain.

• Lord Shiva is also shown wearing a snake in his neck with hood directed inwards. Shiva is also said to have a blue neck or Neelkanth indicating that to control anger one should neutralize the anger continuously (matted hairs) with cool mind (Moon) using positive flow of thoughts (ganga) with ego controlled (naag)

• In Hanuman ki Lanka Yatra, Sursa snake is handled by Hanuman with humility. Sursa, the ego, went on increasing in size when Hanuman increased his size.

• No Hindu marriage is complete without Varmala, which again indicates the need to bow in front of each other.

Self-esteem in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Self-esteem in Mythology

For spirituality, one needs to control two things, first, lust and then the ego. Among, Kama, Krodha, Lobha, Moha and Ahankara, ego and lust both are slow poisons and do not allow one to be spiritual healthy. There are many examples of how to control ego in mythology. Fundamentally, it is said that one should learn to kill ego of oneself and never hurt the ego of others.

Ego in Ramayana is equated to Ravana and in Krishna’s era to Kans. One should learn to kill the ego. In Ramayana, Kumbhkarana is Tamas killed by the self i.e. Rama, Meghnath is Rajas and is killed by the mind i.e. Lakshman and ego, the Ravana, is killed again by self i.e. Rama. In Krishna’s Yuga, Kans is killed by consciousness or Lord Krishna.

Mythology also teaches us to keep our ego under control.

• The door of any temple is always low in height so that nobody can enter without bending. Bending is sign of humility. Most temples have caves, which have the same significance. Older the temple longer will be the cave and smaller will be the entry gate.

• Ego in mythology is depicted by Sheshnaaga with its hood directed inwards indicating keeping your ego under control. The Sheshnaaga over Vishnu when he is resting indicates the same. In Krishna’s birth also, the snake represents controlled ego and protects Krishna when Vasudev takes him out in the rain.

• Lord Shiva is also shown wearing a snake in his neck with hood directed inwards. Shiva is also said to have a blue neck or Neelkanth indicating that to control anger one should neutralize the anger continuously (matted hairs) with cool mind (Moon) using positive flow of thoughts (ganga) with ego controlled (naag)

• In Hanuman ki Lanka Yatra, Sursa snake is handled by Hanuman with humility. Sursa, the ego, went on increasing in size when Hanuman increased his size.

• No Hindu marriage is complete without Varmala, which again indicates the need to bow in front of each other.

Wahans (Vehicles) In Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Wahans (Vehicles) In Mythology

In mythological era, the negative tendency of a man is symbolized with the animal nature. Gods in Indian mythology are symbolized by living a positive behavior. Every God has been given a vehicle or Wahan. Both God and the Wahan symbolized how to live a positive life and how to control the animal tendencies.

Following are a few examples:

  1. Lord Ganesha rides a Mouse. Mouse in mythology is symbolized with greed and Ganesha with one who removes obstacles. The spiritual meaning behind both is – one should learn to control greed to tackle obstacles in life.
  2. Lord Shiva riding Nandi (Bull is symbolized with uncontrolled sexual desires) and the duo signifies that for learning meditation, one needs to control sexual desires first.
  3. Saraswati (the goddesses of knowledge) sitting on Swan symbolizes that to acquire knowledge one must learn to control the power of discrimination or Vivek. Swan can drink milk and leave water from a mixture of milk and water.
  4. Indra (the one who has a complete control over the intellect) riding on the elephant Airavat symbolizes that intellect (Indra) for its development requires control over Masti and madness (elephant).
  5. Durga (the perfect woman) riding a lion symbolizes that to become a perfect woman, one must learn to control her agitation or aggression (lion).
  6. Lakshmi (wealth) riding an owl symbolizes that to earn righteously, one must learn to control Owl like properties within us, which is not to get befooled.
  7. Lord Vishnu (the doer) riding eagle or Garuda (Eagles are opportunistic predators which means they eat almost anything they can find) means controlling your desires to eat the unbalanced food.
  8. Krishna riding five horses means one need to control our five senses.
  9. Kartikeya riding on Peacock symbolizes that one should learn to control one’s pride (vanity) or ego.
  10. The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides Mesha – a ram. Kubera, the God of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Goat also signifies uncontrolled sexual desires but lesser than the bull.
  11. Yamraj rides a buffalo, which is known for its rampant destruction. Lord Yama or Yamraja is referred to as the God of death, twin brother, lord of justice, Dharma Raja. One can do justice only if one has a control over anger and aggressive behavior.

In mythology, apart from Wahans, animals are also shown to be sacrificed, which means to kill that animal tendency within ourselves. For example, during exams, you need to kill your goat behavior, which is known to possess excessive sexual desires. You may need to control them throughout the year but during exams you need to kill them. In Kali Pooja, a buffalo is sacrificed, which again means that in extreme situations, you may need to kill your ego or anger.