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Dr K K Aggarwal

Can diabetes be prevented?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Adhering to a Mediterranean diet, rich in fruits and vegetables and low in animal products, may protect one against developing type 2 diabetes. The diet emphasizes olive oil, vegetables, fruits, nuts, cereals, legumes and fish, and de-emphasizes meat and dairy products. It is a healthy eating plan that seems to help in the prevention of heart disease.

Moreover, the people who tended to stick closest to the diet were those with factors that put them at the highest risk for developing diabetes, such as being older, having a family history of diabetes and being an ex-smoker. These people were expected to have a higher rate of diabetes, but when they adhered to the Mediterranean diet this was not the case.

Type 2 diabetes is typically brought on by poor eating habits, too much weight and too little exercise.

One key factor that might be responsible for the protective effect of the Mediterranean diet is its emphasis on olive oil for cooking, frying, putting on bread and mixing in salad dressings.

Tips to prevent diabetes

1. Eat less

2. Omit refined carbohydrates (white sugar, white rice and white maida)

3. Use olive oil, vegetables, fruits, nuts, cereals, legumes and fish, and reduce meat and dairy products.


Can Diabetes Be Warded Off?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Adhering to Mediterranean diet, rich in fruits and vegetables and low in animal products may protect from type 2 diabetes. The Mediterranean diet gives emphasis to olive oil, vegetables, fruits, nuts, cereals, legumes and fish and de–emphasizes meat and dairy products. It is a healthy eating plan that prevents heart disease.

In the study published in the British Medical Journal, researchers tracked the diets of 13,380 Spanish university graduates with no history of diabetes. The study participants filled out a 136–item food questionnaire, which measured their entire diet (including their intake of fats), their cooking methods and their use of dietary supplements. During an average of 4.4 years of follow–up, the researchers found that people who adhered to a Mediterranean diet had a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In fact, those who very closely adhered to the diet reduced their risk by 83 percent.

Moreover, the people who tended to stick closest to the diet were those with factors that put them at the highest risk for developing diabetes, such as being older, having a family history of diabetes and being an ex–smoker. These people were expected to have a higher rate of diabetes, but when they adhered to the Mediterranean diet this was not the case.

Type 2 diabetes is typically brought on by poor eating habits, too much body weight and too little exercise. One key factor that might be responsible for the protective effect of the Mediterranean diet is its emphasis on olive oil for cooking, frying, putting on bread and mixing in salad dressings.

Tips to prevent diabetes

  • Eat less
  • Omit refined carbohydrates (white sugar, white rice and white maida)
  • Use olive oil, vegetables, fruits, nuts, cereals, legumes and fish, and reduce meat and dairy products.

Can diabetes be prevented?

By
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Can diabetes be prevented?

Adhering to a Mediterranean diet, rich in fruits and vegetables and low in animal products, may protect one against developing type 2 diabetes. The diet emphasizes olive oil, vegetables, fruits, nuts, cereals, legumes and fish, and deemphasizes meat and dairy products.  It is a healthy eating plan that seems to help in the prevention of heart disease.

In a study published in the British Medical Journal, researchers tracked the diets of 13,380 Spanish university graduates with no history of diabetes. Participants filled out a 136-item food questionnaire, which measured their entire diet (including their intake of fats), their cooking methods and their use of dietary supplements. During an average of 4.4 years of follow-up, the team found that people who adhered to a Mediterranean diet had a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In fact, those who stuck very closely to the diet reduced their risk by 83 percent.

Moreover, the people who tended to stick closest to the diet were those with factors that put them at the highest risk for developing diabetes, such as being older, having a family history of diabetes and being an ex-smoker. These people were expected to have a higher rate of diabetes, but when they adhered to the Mediterranean diet this was not the case.

Type 2 diabetes is typically brought on by poor eating habits, too much weight and too little exercise.

One key factor that might be responsible for the protective effect of the Mediterranean diet is its emphasis on olive oil for cooking, frying, putting on bread and mixing in salad dressings.

Tips to prevent diabetes

 1.  Eat less

2.  Omit refined carbohydrates (white sugar, white rice and white maida)

3.  Use olive oil, vegetables, fruits, nuts, cereals, legumes and fish, and reduce meat and dairy products.

Even Nuts Can Cause Severe Allergy

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Most allergic reactions in children occur at home, most are triggered by peanuts or cashews, and treatment is often delayed.

Anaphylaxis is a severe life-threatening allergic reaction and develops within seconds or minutes of exposure. The immune system releases histamine that cause tightening of the airways and shock. Common causes of anaphylaxis are foods, drugs or insect bites.

In the journal Allergy, Dr. Mimi L. K. Tang from Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne and colleagues report 123 anaphylactic reactions in 117 children over a 5-year period. The median age of the children was 2.4 years. One death was reported in a 7-year old girl with a known peanut allergy who ate a peanut satay sauce. Most events, 48%, took place at home, and almost all initially involved breathing and skin symptoms. Gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects were also common.

The median time from exposure to the offending agent to allergic reaction was 10 minutes, and the median time until treatment was 40 minutes.

Food was the most common trigger (85 percent), with peanuts (18 percent) and cashew nuts (13 percent) the most common cause. Six percent of allergic reactions were caused by drugs and 3 percent by insect stings.

Tagore’s “Kabuliwala” the archetypal nut seller has never been as significant as in this modern era, when plethora of information is available that nuts are good for the heart.

Walnuts, are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, and have beneficial effect on serum cholesterol.

Replacing 35% of the energy obtained from monounsaturated fats [1] or 20% of calories [2] of total diet with walnuts have shown to reduce 4 -12 percent reductions in serum total cholesterol and 6-12 percent reduction in serum bad LDL cholesterol levels.

Walnuts also improve endothelial function in patients with elevated cholesterol [3]

In one study when almonds were given replacing 20% of energy (68g) in healthy adults and in adults with mildly elevated cholesterol levels, the diet led to marked improvements in lipids within four weeks [4].

Prospective Adventist Health Study results have shown that individuals who consume nuts more than four times per week have significant reductions in mortality from coronary heart disease and in nonfatal heart attacks compared to those who consumed nuts less than once per week [5]

Results of Physicians’ Health Study also showed that men who consumed nuts two or more times per week had significant reductions in total coronary deaths and sudden cardiac deaths. [6]

Almonds, peanuts and walnuts contain Vitamin E and are good for the heart. People who take nuts 5 days a week have 20 per cent less chances of having a heart attack. Patients may also consume nuts and seeds in moderate amounts.

Being plant in origin nuts contains zero cholesterol.

References
1. Ann Intern Med 2000; 132:538.
2. N Engl J Med 1993; 328:603
3. Circulation 2004; 109:1609.
4. Circulation 2004; 109:1609
5. Am J Clin Nutr 2003; 77:1379.
6. Arch Intern Med 1992; 152:1416