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Dr K K Aggarwal

Spiritual prescriptions learnt from patients

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As doctors, we are witnesses to human suffering. When we were young in medical college, we were quite disturbed seeing the sufferings of the people. But, in our practice, we have learnt many spiritual prescriptions from our patients. These have not only helped us to heal our patients but also changed our perception to health and sickness.

I recall, Swami Bodhanand, a disciple of Swami Chinmayananda, was once hospitalized under our care. When I asked him to give me a spiritual message, he said only two words “Detached Attachment”. He said, “As a doctor you should behave like a lotus leaf. It is wet as long as there is a drop of water on it, but once the drop is out, the leaf is as dry as if the water was never there.” The message was that “we should be attached to our patients as long as they are with us. The day they die, we should be completely detached from them or else we will not be able to treat other patients”.

I saw another spiritual guru through our Chief Anesthetist. The fee he paid me was a spiritual message “Suno Samjho Jano Karo – Hear Understand Wisdom and Do”. He said that hearing is different from listening, listening is different from wisdom and wisdom is different from doing. Unless you hear, understand what you have heard and implement, the learning has no value.

One of my Buddhist patients gave me a spiritual learning, which has helped me a lot in my routine clinical practice. He taught me the basic Buddhist message that there is suffering all over, there is a reason for every suffering and it is possible to maintain sufferings. This message fits into the main message of Hinduism and also the main teaching from Garud Purana.

In Hinduism, we know that the very fact that we are born in this life means that in our last life, we could not get liberation, as Hinduism believes that after liberation you are not reborn. Not getting liberated in the last birth means that some sufferings were left in our life. The basic purpose of this birth, therefore, is to face sufferings. When the basic purpose of our birth is to face sufferings, then why suffer from these sufferings. Every time we suffer, we should thank God that he has reduced one more. The period in between two sufferings is called a happy period (Sukh). In fact that period is nothing but a period of rest given by God to us to prepare the body for next suffering. This, as a concept of counselling, helps my patients in managing most of their mental disturbances.

Not telling a patient that he is suffering from terminal cancer sometimes works. One of my patient’s father aged 83 years was found to have extensive cancer of the prostate. Medically, we all gave him three months to live. My patient did not have the courage to tell his father or the family members that he (the father) had extensive cancer. He took me into confidence and played a game with the family. We gathered all the family members and told them that with the surgery this cancer had been cured. A party was organized in the evening to celebrate the cure. The magic happened; he lived almost a symptom-free life for the next 9 years. I have tried this on many of my patients thereafter and it works. The probable explanation was loss of fear of death, a confidence in his doctor and faith in himself.

The way to live up to the age of hundred is to go on working in life. My great grand–father–in–law was 75 years old, when I got married. That year, he gathered all family members from across the world and said that his purpose of life was over and he would like a collective family photograph and like to quit the world. Nothing happened for a year and he did this again next year. The entire family from across the world gathered but he remained alive for another year. This went on for three years. Suddenly, we played a spiritual trick on him and told everyone to convince him that he is going to live for 100 years as he has many more works of the family to be done. Every year, we gave him law students from within the family to be taught (he was a lawyer himself), or gave him the responsibility of finding a boy for some eligible girl in the family. We made him teach and search for suitable bride/bridegrooms for years together and he actually died at the age of 100 years. This is the beauty of positive attitude in life.

Spiritual prescriptions learnt from patients

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Spiritual prescriptions learnt from patients

In a hospital practice, we all witness suffering all the time. When we were young, in medical college, quite often we were disturbed seeing the sufferings of the people. But, in our practice, we have learnt many spiritual prescriptions from our patients. These have not only helped us to heal our patients but also changed our perception to health and sickness.

I recall Swami Bodhanand, a disciple of Swami Chinmayananda, was once hospitalized under our care. When I asked him to give me a spiritual message, he told me only two words “Detached Attachment”. He said, “As a doctor you should behave like a lotus leaf. It is wet as long as a drop of water is there, but once the drop is out, the leaf is as dry as if the water was never there.” The message was that “we should be attached to our patients as long as they are with us. The day they die, we should be completely detached from them or else we will not be able to treat other patients”.

I saw another spiritual guru through our Chief Anesthetist. The fee he paid to me was a spiritual message “Suno Samjho Jano Karo – Hear Understand Wisdom and Do”. He said that hearing is different from listening, listening is different from wisdom and wisdom is different from doing. Unless you hear, understand what you have heard and implement, the learning has no value.

One of my Buddhist patients gave me a spiritual learning, which has helped me a lot in my routine clinical practice. He taught me the basic Buddhist message that there is suffering all over; there is a reason for every suffering and it is possible to maintain sufferings. This message fits into the main message of Hinduism and also the main teaching from Garud Purana.

In Hinduism, we know that the very fact that we are born in this life means that in our last life, we could not get liberation as Hinduism believes that after liberation you are not reborn. Not getting liberated in the last birth means that some sufferings were left in our life. The basic purpose of this birth, therefore, is to face sufferings. When the basic purpose of our birth is to face sufferings, then why suffer from these sufferings. Every time we suffer, we should thank God that he has reduced one more. The period in between two sufferings is called a happy period (Sukh). In fact that period is nothing but a period of rest given by God to us to prepare the body for next suffering. This as a concept of counseling helps my patients in managing most of their mental disturbances.

Sometimes not telling a patient that he is suffering from terminal cancer works. One of my patient’s father aged 83 years was found to have extensive cancer of the prostate. Medically, we all gave him three months’ to live. My patient did not have the courage to tell his father or the family members that he (the father) had extensive cancer. He took me into confidence and played a game with the family. We gathered all the family members and told them that with the surgery this cancer had been cured. A party was organized in the evening to celebrate the cure. The magic happened; he lived almost a symptom–free life for the next 9 years. I have tried this on many of my patients thereafter and it works. The probable explanation was loss of fear of death, a confidence in his doctor and faith in himself.

The way to live up to the age of hundred is to go on working in life. My great grandfather–in–law was 75 years old, when I got married. That year, he gathered all family members across the world and said that his purpose of life was over and, he would like a collective family photograph and like to quit the world. Nothing happened for a year and on 20th July next year, he again played behaved the same way. Family from across the world gathered but he remained alive for another year. This went on for three years. Suddenly, we played a spiritual trick on him and told everyone to convince him that he is going to live for 100 years as he has many more work of the family to be done. Every year, we gave him law students from within the family to be taught (he was a lawyer himself), or gave him the responsibility of finding a boy for some eligible girl in the family. We made him teach and search for suitable bride/bridegrooms for years together and he actually died at the age of 100 years. This is the beauty of positive attitude in life.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Should doctors smile while talking to their patients?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Bhagavad Gita 2.10: tam uva ca hṛṣīkeśaḥ, prahasann iva bhārata, senayor ubhayor madhye, viṣīdantam idaḿ vacaḥ SYNONYMS: tam — unto him; uvāca — said; hṛṣīkeśaḥ — the master of the senses, Kṛṣṇa; prahasan — smiling; iva — like that; bhārata — O Dhṛtarāṣṭra, descendant of Bharata; senayoḥ — of the armies; ubhayoḥ — of both parties; madhye — between; viṣīdantam — unto the lamenting one; idam — the following; vacaḥ — words.

TRANSLATION: O descendant of Bharata, at that time Krishna, smiling, in the midst of both the armies, spoke the following words to the grief-stricken Arjuna. The answer comes in Bhagavad Gita, the first text book of counseling. When grief-ridden Arjuna approaches him, he starts his counseling in happy and smiling mood. Arjuna was grief-filled, sad and rebellious. Yet Krishna smiled.

The word in the Gita is prahasann, which means to smile before laughing (beginning to laugh). It was not a weak or full smile or a sarcastic grimace, but a very positive smile.

The grief of a patient halves if he sees his doctor smiling or the relatives see a smile on the face of the doctor coming out of the operation theater. In a situation like in Bhagavad Gita, it also gives confidence to the patient (Arjuna) that his doctor (Krishna) has understood his problem fully and has a solution to his problem. Buddha is also shown smiling and Goddess Kushmanda is also shown with a smiling face.

 

Should doctors smile while talking to their patients?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Should doctors smile while talking to their patients?

Bhagavad Gita 2.10: tam uvāca hṛṣīkeśaḥ, prahasann iva bhārata, senayor ubhayor madhye, viṣīdantam idaḿ vacaḥ

SYNONYMS: tam — unto him; uvāca — said; hṛṣīkeśaḥ — the master of the senses, Kṛṣṇa; prahasan — smiling; iva — like that; bhārata — O Dhṛtarāṣṭra, descendant of Bharata; senayoḥ — of the armies; ubhayoḥ — of both parties; madhye — between; viṣīdantam — unto the lamenting one; idam — the following; vacaḥ — words.

TRANSLATION: O descendant of Bharata, at that time Krishna, smiling, in the midst of both the armies, spoke the following words to the grief-stricken Arjuna.

The answer comes in Bhagavad Gita, the first text book of counseling. When grief ridden Arjuna approaches him he starts his counseling in happy and smiling mood. Arjuna was grief-filled, sad and rebellious. Yet Krishna smiled. The word in the Gita is prahasann, which means to smile before laughing (beginning to laugh). It was not a weak or full smile or a sarcastic grimace, but a very positive smile. About half of the worry of a patient is relieved if he/she sees the doctor smiling or the relatives see a smile on the face of a doctor coming out of operation theater. In a situation similar to that in Bhagavad Gita, a smile also gives confidence to the patient (Arjuna) that his doctor (Krishna) has understood his problem fully and has a solution to his problem.

Buddha is also shown smiling and Goddess Kushmanda is also shown with a smiling face.

 

Spiritual prescriptions learnt from patients

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Spiritual prescriptions learnt from patients

As doctors we are witness to human suffering. When we were young in medical college, we were quite disturbed seeing the sufferings of the people. But, in our practice, we have learnt many spiritual prescriptions from our patients. These have not only helped us to heal our patients but also changed our perception to health and sickness.

I recall Swami Bodhanand, a disciple of Swami Chinmayananda, was once hospitalized under our care. When I asked him to give me a spiritual message, he said only two words “Detached Attachment”. He said, “As a doctor you should behave like a lotus leaf. It is wet as long as there is a drop of water on it, but once the drop is out, the leaf is as dry as if the water was never there.” The message was that “we should be attached to our patients as long as they are with us. The day they die, we should be completely detached from them or else we will not be able to treat other patients”.

I saw another spiritual guru through our Chief Anesthetist. The fee he paid me was a spiritual message “Suno Samjho Jano Karo – Hear Understand Wisdom and Do”. He said that hearing is different from listening, listening is different from wisdom and wisdom is different from doing. Unless you hear, understand what you have heard and implement, the learning has no value.

One of my Buddhist patients gave me a spiritual learning, which has helped me a lot in my routine clinical practice. He taught me the basic Buddhist message that there is suffering all over, there is a reason for every suffering and it is possible to maintain sufferings. This message fits into the main message of Hinduism and also the main teaching from Garud Purana.

In Hinduism, we know that the very fact that we are born in this life means that in our last life, we could not get liberation as Hinduism believes that after liberation you are not reborn. Not getting liberated in the last birth means that some sufferings were left in our life. The basic purpose of this birth, therefore, is to face sufferings. When the basic purpose of our birth is to face sufferings, then why suffer from these sufferings. Every time we suffer, we should thank God that he has reduced one more. The period in between two sufferings is called a happy period (Sukh). In fact that period is nothing but a period of rest given by God to us to prepare the body for next suffering. This as a concept of counseling helps my patients in managing most of their mental disturbances.

Not telling a patient that he is suffering from terminal cancer sometime works. One of my patient’s father aged 83 years was found to have extensive cancer of the prostate. Medically, we all gave him three months to live. My patient did not have the courage to tell his father or the family members that he (the father) had extensive cancer. He took me into confidence and played a game with the family. We gathered all the family members and told them that with the surgery this cancer had been cured. A party was organized in the evening to celebrate the cure. The magic happened; he lived almost a symptom–free life for the next 9 years. I have tried this on many of my patients thereafter and it works. The probable explanation was loss of fear of death, a confidence in his doctor and faith in himself.

The way to live up to the age of hundred is to go on working in life. My great grand–father–in–law was 75 years old, when I got married. That year, he gathered all family members across the world and said that his purpose of life was over and, he would like a collective family photograph and like to quit the world. Nothing happened for a year and he did this again next year. The Entire family from across the world gathered but he remained alive for another year. This went on for three years. Suddenly, we played a spiritual trick on him and told everyone to convince him that he is going to live for 100 years as he has many more work of the family to be done. Every year, we gave him law students from within the family to be taught (he was a lawyer himself), or gave him the responsibility of finding a boy for some eligible girl in the family. We made him teach and search for suitable bride/bridegrooms for years together and he actually died at the age of 100 years. This is the beauty of positive attitude in life.

Should doctors smile while talking to their patients?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Should doctors smile while talking to their patients?

Bhagavad Gita 2.10: tam uvāca hṛṣīkeśaḥ, prahasann iva bhārata, senayor ubhayor madhye, viṣīdantam idaḿ vacaḥ SYNONYMS: tam — unto him; uvāca — said; hṛṣīkeśaḥ — the master of the senses, Kṛṣṇa; prahasan — smiling; iva — like that; bhārata — O Dhṛtarāṣṭra, descendant of Bharata; senayoḥ — of the armies; ubhayoḥ — of both parties; madhye — between; viṣīdantam — unto the lamenting one; idam — the following; vacaḥ — words.

TRANSLATION: O descendant of Bharata, at that time Krishna, smiling, in the midst of both the armies, spoke the following words to the grief-stricken Arjuna.

The answer comes in Bhagavad Gita, the first text book of counseling. When grief ridden Arjuna approaches him he starts his counseling in happy and smiling mood. Arjuna was grief-filled, sad and rebellious. Yet Krishna smiled. The word in the Gita is prahasann, which means to smile before laughing (beginning to laugh). It was not a weak or full smile or a sarcastic grimace, but a very positive smile. About half of the worry of a patient is relieved if he/she sees the doctor smiling or the relatives see a smile on the face of a doctor coming out of operation theater. In a situation similar to that in Bhagavad Gita, a smile also gives confidence to the patient (Arjuna) that his doctor (Krishna) has understood his problem fully and has a solution to his problem. Buddha is also shown smiling and Goddess Kushmanda is also shown with a smiling face.

Spiritual prescriptions learnt from patients

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Spiritual prescriptions learnt from patients

As doctors we are witness to human suffering. When we were young in medical college, we were quite disturbed seeing the sufferings of the people. But, in our practice, we have learnt many spiritual prescriptions from our patients. These have not only helped us to heal our patients but also changed our perception to health and sickness.

I recall Swami Bodhanand, a disciple of Swami Chinmayananda, was once hospitalized under our care. When I asked him to give me a spiritual message, he said only two words “Detached Attachment”. He said, “As a doctor you should behave like a lotus leaf. It is wet as long as there is a drop of water on it, but once the drop is out, the leaf is as dry as if the water was never there.” The message was that “we should be attached to our patients as long as they are with us. The day they die, we should be completely detached from them or else we will not be able to treat other patients”.

I saw another spiritual guru through our Chief Anesthetist. The fee he paid me was a spiritual message “Suno Samjho Jano Karo – Hear Understand Wisdom and Do”. He said that hearing is different from listening, listening is different from wisdom and wisdom is different from doing. Unless you hear, understand what you have heard and implement, the learning has no value.

One of my Buddhist patients gave me a spiritual learning, which has helped me a lot in my routine clinical practice. He taught me the basic Buddhist message that there is suffering all over, there is a reason for every suffering and it is possible to maintain sufferings. This message fits into the main message of Hinduism and also the main teaching from Garud Purana.

In Hinduism, we know that the very fact that we are born in this life means that in our last life, we could not get liberation as Hinduism believes that after liberation you are not reborn. Not getting liberated in the last birth means that some sufferings were left in our life. The basic purpose of this birth, therefore, is to face sufferings. When the basic purpose of our birth is to face sufferings, then why suffer from these sufferings. Every time we suffer, we should thank God that he has reduced one more. The period in between two sufferings is called a happy period (Sukh). In fact that period is nothing but a period of rest given by God to us to prepare the body for next suffering. This as a concept of counseling helps my patients in managing most of their mental disturbances.

Not telling a patient that he is suffering from terminal cancer sometime works. One of my patient’s father aged 83 years was found to have extensive cancer of the prostate. Medically, we all gave him three months to live. My patient did not have the courage to tell his father or the family members that he (the father) had extensive cancer. He took me into confidence and played a game with the family. We gathered all the family members and told them that with the surgery this cancer had been cured. A party was organized in the evening to celebrate the cure. The magic happened; he lived almost a symptom–free life for the next 9 years. I have tried this on many of my patients thereafter and it works. The probable explanation was loss of fear of death, a confidence in his doctor and faith in himself.

The way to live up to the age of hundred is to go on working in life. My great grand–father–in–law was 75 years old, when I got married. That year, he gathered all family members across the world and said that his purpose of life was over and, he would like a collective family photograph and like to quit the world. Nothing happened for a year and he did this again next year. The Entire family from across the world gathered but he remained alive for another year. This went on for three years. Suddenly, we played a spiritual trick on him and told everyone to convince him that he is going to live for 100 years as he has many more work of the family to be done. Every year, we gave him law students from within the family to be taught (he was a lawyer himself), or gave him the responsibility of finding a boy for some eligible girl in the family. We made him teach and search for suitable bride/bridegrooms for years together and he actually died at the age of 100 years. This is the beauty of positive attitude in life.

How can you explain coronary artery disease to your patients?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The following is how I communicate with my patients and explain to them about coronary artery disease.

• There are three coronary arteries, which can be equated to three main roads of the city.

• Any road has shops on each side. The coronary artery has the endothelium on the sides.

• There are pavements in front of the shops. The pavements in coronary arteries are called intima-media.

• When the local municipal corporation does not maintain discipline, shopkeepers start encroaching the pavement. In terms of coronary arteries, this is equivalent to intima media thickness.

• The next to follow are temporary encroachments of the road, which is equivalent to several plaques in the coronary arteries.

• Then comes permanent encroachment, which is equivalent to heart plaques.

• With encroachment, the traffic slows down and heavy honking of horns starts. This denotes angina or chest pain.

• When the traffic congestion is heavy, motorists often blow their horn continuously. This can be equated to unstable angina.

• When the traffic stops, but the car engine is still working, this can be likened to a heart attack.

• When the car stops and the engine also stops, this is a cardiac arrest.

Should doctors be detached?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In dealing with patients, the traditional Doctor-Patient relationship model has been that doctor should remain cool, calm and collected at all times. Doctor’s approach needs to be strictly scientific, logical, objective, methodical precise and dispassionate. This model has been since the era of William Osler, the father of modern medicine. The term used is imperturbability which means coolness and presence of mind under all circumstances. Osler said a rare and precious gift to doctor is right of detachment. The right of detachment insulates the doctors and protects them from the powerful emotions that patients display in their presence like anger, frustration, grief, rage and bewilderment. It also insulates patients from the rolling emotions that doctors may at times feel towards them. However, a detached attitude also insulates doctors from empathizing with patients. A detached doctor may talk in a language that is over patient’s head. Detachment is not like a light switch that you can turn on and off to suit the situation. Detachment as a practice cannot be in isolation if it becomes your personal style of distracting from the world, it may not be just for the patients but also from your colleague, family friends and even yourself. I recall when I joined by hospital the first lesson given to me by my boss was not to get unduly attached with patients. As etiquette, we were taught not to socialize with patients. Even today the new American Guidelines talk that doctors should not socialize with their patients on social media including Facebook. Even doctors are human beings and their personal lives should not be known to patients. As far as lawsuits are concerned, it is equally true that known close patients file a law suit much more than unknown people because over a period of time they know your weakness. One should learn to empathize with the patients and yet be detached from its results. Doctors who follow Bhagwad Gita understand this concept very well.

Spiritual prescriptions learnt from patients

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Spiritual prescriptions learnt from patients

In a hospital practice, we all are a witness to suffering all the time. When we were young, in medical college, we quite often were disturbed seeing the sufferings of the people. But, in our practice, we have learnt many spiritual prescriptions from our patients. These have not only helped us to heal our patients but also changed our perception to health and sickness. I recall Swami Bodhanand, a disciple of Swami Chinmayananda, was once admitted with us. When I asked him to give me a spiritual message, he told me only two words “Detached Attachment”. He said, “As a doctor you should behave like a lotus leaf. It is wet as long as a drop of water is there, but once the drop is out, the leaf is as dry as if the water was never there.” The message was that “we should be attached to our patients as long as they are with us. The day they die, we should be completely detached from them or else we will not be able to treat other patients”. I saw another spiritual guru through our Chief Anesthetist. The fee he paid to me was a spiritual message “Suno Samjho Jano Karo – Hear Understand Wisdom and Doing”. He said that hearing is different from listening, listening is different from wisdom and wisdom is different from doing. Unless you hear, understand what you have heard and implement, the learning has no value. One of my Buddhist patients gave me a spiritual learning, which has helped me a lot in my routine clinical practice. He taught me the basic Buddhist message that there is suffering all over; there is a reason for every suffering and it is possible to maintain sufferings. This message fits into the main message of Hinduism and also the main teaching from Garud Purana. In Hinduism, we know that the very fact that we are born in this life means that in our last life, we could not get liberation as Hinduism believes that after liberation you are not reborn. Not getting liberated in the last birth means that some sufferings were left in our life. The basic purpose of this birth, therefore, is to face sufferings. When the basic purpose of our birth is to face sufferings, then why suffer from these sufferings. Every time we suffer, we should thank God that he has reduced one more. The period in between two sufferings is called a Happy period (Sukh). In fact that period is nothing but a period of rest given by God to us to prepare the body for next suffering. This as a concept of counseling helps my patients in managing most of their mental disturbances. Sometimes not telling a patient that he is suffering from terminal cancer works. One of my patient’s father aged 83 years was found to have extensive cancer of the prostate. Medically, we all gave him three months’ to live. My patient had no guts to tell his father or the family members that he (the father) had extensive cancer. He took me into confidence and played a game with the family. We gathered all the family members and told them that with the surgery this cancer had been cured. A party was organized in the evening to celebrate the cure. The magic happened; he lived almost a symptom–free life for the next 9 years. I have tried this on many of my patients thereafter and it works. The probable explanation was loss of fear of death, a confidence in his doctor and faith in himself. The way to live up to the age of hundred is to go on working in life. My great grand–father–in–law was 75 years old, when I got married. That year, he gathered all family members across the world and said that his purpose of life was over and, he would like a collective family photograph and like to quit the world. Nothing happened for a year and on 20th July next year, he again played behaved the same way. Family from across the world gathered but he remained alive for another year. This went on for three years. Suddenly, we played a spiritual trick on him and told everyone to convince him that he is going to live for 100 years as he has many more work of the family to be done. Every year, we gave him law students from within the family to be taught (he was a lawyer himself), or gave him the responsibility of finding a boy for some eligible girl in the family. We made him teach and search for the bride for years together and he actually died at the age of 100 years. That is the beauty of positive attitude in life.

Patients with acidity should avoid chocolates and peppermint

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Persistent acidity is usually due to reflux of acid from the stomach into the food pipe. Mild cases of acidity reflux can usually be managed with lifestyle and dietary modifications along with antacids, H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors.

However, patients in whom lifestyle management along with empirical treatment is unsuccessful or who have symptoms suggestive of complicated diseases should undergo endoscopy to rule out cancer of the food pipe, a condition linked with persistent acidity.

Symptoms that may suggest complicated disease include loss of appetite, loss of weight and difficulty in swallowing food, bleeding and signs of systemic illness.

Lifestyle changes for reflux involve elevation of head and of the body, avoidance of food before sleep and avoidance of food which makes the food pipe valve lax. The examples of such foods include fatty food, chocolates, peppermint and excessive intake of alcohol.

Hurry, worry and curry are the three main factors for causing acidity apart from alcohol and smoking. People with acidity should consume less of fermented, sour, salty and pungent foods.

Alternative medicine and healing

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The universe is made of five elements, namely air, space, fire, water and earth. Any imbalance of these five elements leads to natural disasters. The science which deals with balancing these five elements and using them as a therapeutic modality is Naturopathy. The five elements also constitute human body. These five elements in the body form three humors i.e. movement, metabolism and structure, which define the Vata, Pitta and Kapha functions of Ayurveda.

A vitiation of any of the three humors leads to diseases and balancing these three humours makes the basis of Ayurvedic healing.

These three humours define seven Dhatus – Rasa, Rakta, Mamsa, Medha, Asthi, Majja and Shukra (plasma, blood, muscles, adipose tissues, bone, bone marrow and vital force including semen and ova).

The science which deals with balance of these dhatus is again Ayurveda.

These seven dhatus make organs, organs have receptors. Various drugs act at these receptors. This forms the basis of the modern allopathic medicine. The science which deals with these organs is modern science or allopathy.

When the drugs act as receptors, the drugs can be allopathic, homeopathic tincture or Ayurvedic. All of them differ in their preparations. Ayurvedic drugs are from natural sources potentised by grinding and homeopathic drugs are alcohol extracts of various molecules, which may be plant in origin or biochemical in origin.

Homeopathic tinctures can also be titrated or potentised or triturated.

The drug molecules can be converted into more potentised form as mentioned above by grinding in Ayurveda, trituration in homeopathy and by using nanotechnology in modern medicine.

Matter can also be converted into non–matter, a technique used in classical homeopathy and bhasma therapy in Ayurveda. A similar technology is used for vaccine therapy in modern medicine.

In homeopathy, liquid and solid molecules are triturated or potentised repeatedly in succession till no more matter is traceable in the original solution. Once the matter is converted into non–matter it becomes a classical potentised homeopathy medicine. The same exercise is done by repeatedly heating; matter can be converted into potentised non–matter, a technique well–defined in Ayurveda.

In science of physics, matter is made of atoms; atoms break down into proton, neutron and electron. They breakdown into photons and they into quantum and quantum into energy and energy into waves and these waves arise out of nothing called consciousness or the potential.’

The science, which deals with balancing these waves and shunya or consciousness, is the science of yogic meditation.

The science, which deals with balancing at the level of quantum and energy, is the science of classical homeopathy and bhasma Ayurveda.

All the above make it very clear that most of these pathies act at different levels and therefore there is a ground for their merger.

The time has come for all the pathies to work together and carry out research together so that benefits of each can be availed of in treating the patients.

The universe is made of five elements, namely air, space, fire, water and earth. Any imbalance of these five elements leads to natural disasters. The science which deals with balancing these five elements and using them as a therapeutic modality is Naturopathy. The five elements also constitute human body. These five elements in the body form three humors i.e. movement, metabolism and structure, which define the Vata, Pitta and Kapha functions of Ayurveda.

A vitiation of any of the three humors leads to diseases and balancing these three humours makes the basis of Ayurvedic healing.

These three humours define seven Dhatus – Rasa, Rakta, Mamsa, Medha, Asthi, Majja and Shukra (plasma, blood, muscles, adipose tissues, bone, bone marrow and vital force including semen and ova).

The science which deals with balance of these dhatus is again Ayurveda.

These seven dhatus make organs, organs have receptors. Various drugs act at these receptors. This forms the basis of the modern allopathic medicine. The science which deals with these organs is modern science or allopathy.

When the drugs act as receptors, the drugs can be allopathic, homeopathic tincture or Ayurvedic. All of them differ in their preparations. Ayurvedic drugs are from natural sources potentised by grinding and homeopathic drugs are alcohol extracts of various molecules, which may be plant in origin or biochemical in origin.

Homeopathic tinctures can also be titrated or potentised or triturated.

The drug molecules can be converted into more potentised form as mentioned above by grinding in Ayurveda, trituration in homeopathy and by using nanotechnology in modern medicine.

Matter can also be converted into non–matter, a technique used in classical homeopathy and bhasma therapy in Ayurveda. A similar technology is used for vaccine therapy in modern medicine.

In homeopathy, liquid and solid molecules are triturated or potentised repeatedly in succession till no more matter is traceable in the original solution. Once the matter is converted into non–matter it becomes a classical potentised homeopathy medicine. The same exercise is done by repeatedly heating; matter can be converted into potentised non–matter, a technique well–defined in Ayurveda.

In science of physics, matter is made of atoms; atoms break down into proton, neutron and electron. They breakdown into photons and they into quantum and quantum into energy and energy into waves and these waves arise out of nothing called consciousness or the potential.’

The science, which deals with balancing these waves and shunya or consciousness, is the science of yogic meditation.

The science, which deals with balancing at the level of quantum and energy, is the science of classical homeopathy and bhasma Ayurveda.

All the above make it very clear that most of these pathies act at different levels and therefore there is a ground for their merger.

The time has come for all the pathies to work together and carry out research together so that benefits of each can be availed of in treating the patients.

Depression Should Be Treated In Patients with Diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Presence of depression in diabetic patients is the most important factor leading to erectile dysfunction in such patients.

An India cum US study published in the Journal of Urology, depression and erectile dysfunction are related to each other in the form of a vicious cycle. Depression instigates erectile dysfunction and erectile dysfunction perpetuates the symptoms of depression.

India is the diabetic capital of the world and both the incidence and prevalence of diabetes are increasing day by day.
It is, therefore, important for the family physician to look for presence of depression in patients with diabetes.
Diabetic patients who complain of erectile dysfunction in the study also have higher prevalence of high blood pressure and cholesterol abnormalities. These patients were also of older age with uncontrolled diabetes, history of smoking and longer duration of diabetes.

It was also shown that patients who develop erectile dysfunction also had diabetes, eye disorders, neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease.

Effective control of diabetes may reduce both depressive symptoms and erectile dysfunctions in such cases.

Heart Patients Beware of summer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Dehydration can precipitate heart attack in susceptible individuals. The normal fluid requirement is 30 ml per kg weight, but the same needs to be increased in the summer because of the loss of fluid from sweating. Apart from water, sodium or salt is also lost. A person, therefore, needs to take more fruits during summer period.

Not passing urine in eight hours, dry armpits, feeling exhausted or feeling weak are suggestive of underlying dehydration. Dehydration can make the blood thick and precipitate heart attack in patients with uncontrolled blood pressure or diabetes.

Walking is a necessity for heart patients and the same should be continued even during peak summer but the timing should be so chosen that peak heat periods are avoided. One can walk early in the morning or late in the evening. People taking anti–allergic pills should take special precautions as they are more likely to get heat stroke.

Heat stroke is a medical emergency leading to charring of organs because of extreme internal heat. A person’s temperature may be more than 105°F.

Prescribe insurance to all patients in your prescription

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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When we do not take our car on the roads without insurance then why do we take our body out without insurance?

  1. Everybody should be insured and for those who cannot, the government must pay for their insurance. Insurance should be added in the prescription of a doctor.
  2. Even if a patient has a disease, he or she needs insurance so that he is covered for other illnesses. Remember one is entitled for 1% of the cover as room rent or 2% for the ICU bed.
  3. The coverage amount is for one full year. Do not exhaust it in one admission.
  4. The patients should choose their insurance so that even OPD treatment is added to the coverage.
  5. A person can have more than one insurance policy.
  6. Health is not mere absence of disease but a state of physical, mental, social, environmental, spiritual and financial well being.
  7. The purpose of life should be to desire for inner happiness and for that to earn righteously.
  8. One must plan for the old age; remember that today one can live above the age of 80 and old age treatments can be very costly.
  9. Most disputes are due to property and one must write his or her will in time. Property dispute is number one cause of heart attack in the country.
  10. All doctors should be insured against malpractice. To err is human and malpractice is not a criminal negligence.
  11. The banks should come out with schemes so that patients can get loans for treatments on the spot.