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Dr K K Aggarwal

Walking 2000 steps extra lowers cardiovascular risk

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Walking 20 min at a moderate pace each day is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes in patients with impaired glucose tolerance, according to a study in The Lancet. People who walked 2,000 steps more per day at baseline had a 10% lower risk of cardiovascular death, paralysis or heart attack during an average follow–up of 6 years according to Thomas Yates, PhD, of the University of Leicester in England, and colleagues. And those who increased the amount they walked by 2,000 steps per day from baseline to 1 year had a similar reduction in risk of cardiovascular events.

The findings from NAVIGATOR trial support both the promotion of increased ambulatory activity, and the avoidance of decreased ambulatory activity irrespective of the starting level, as important targets in the prevention of chronic disease.

Diet for heart disease prevention with special reference to edible oils

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Food of plant in origin contains no cholesterol. Only animal foods have cholesterol, therefore, all oils which are plant in origin will have zero cholesterol while animal fat like Desi Ghee (cow or buffalo) will have cholesterol.

• A saturated fat will be solid at room temperature, while the fat, which is unsaturated will be liquid at room temperature. All plant oils, therefore, will be unsaturated and desi ghee, butter will be saturated. When an unsaturated liquid oil is hydrogenated, it becomes hydrogenated oil, solid at room temperature and therefore, will be saturated.

• Unsaturated oils can be polyunsaturated or monounsaturated. Polyunsaturated oils will oxidize on heating and may not be suitable for reuse. Monounsaturated oils are heat stable and the oils can be reused after frying or boiling.

• Omega 3 fatty acids in unsaturated oils are the key for cardiovascular prevention. The N3:N6 ratio is the one which classify various oils. More N3 means more omega 3 fatty acids.

• When choosing unsaturated oils, a blend of oils is better than single oil and, if one oil has to be used, then it is preferred to be monounsaturated. A single oil if used should be mustered oil, groundnut oil or olive oil. A recent study has shown that Mediterranean diet, which involves consumption of pure virgin olive oil in adequate amount, can cause regression of heart diseases. Virgin olive oil has also been shown to dissolve gallbladder stones. There are blend of oils available, which are a mix of poly and mono–unsaturated oils and if they have more N3:N6 ratio, they can be consumed from healthy point of view.

• Trans fats are the biggest culprit (hydrogenated oils). Saturated fats increase LDL bad cholesterol while trans fats increase LDL bad cholesterol and simultaneously reduce good HDL cholesterol. It is better to consume desi ghee than vanaspati ghee.

 

• Moderation and variety is the answer. One should not consume more than ½ kg of ghee, oil, butter in a month, which means 3 teaspoonfuls in a day.

• One should not re–fry or deep fry food articles. One should use non–stick pans for reducing the amount of oil in cooking. The smaller pieces of vegetables you cut while cooking the more will be available surface area and more will be oil consumption. One should boil the vegetables and cook them to reduce the amount of oil required for cooking.

• There are some medicines available such as lipase inhibitors, called cheating drugs, which do not allow fat to be absorbed if taken in excess in parties. As per naturopathy, consuming a glass of water with lemon after half an hour of eating food may help in washing of the fat lined on the intestinal lining.

• A 1% rise in bad cholesterol increases the chances of heart attack by 2% and 1% reduction in good HDL cholesterol reduces the chances of heart attack by 3%.

Prevention strategy relies on lifestyle

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Stenting may not always be the answer to treating heart disease with stable coronary artery disease. A German study has shown that patients with stable coronary artery disease who were put on an exercise regimen had significantly higher rates of event-free survival than those who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In the study, 70% of patients in the exercise program had event-free survival — no stroke, heart attack, or death — compared with 50% of stented patients after four years. Exercise is an important part of any type of prevention, and it should be instituted for “anyone with stable coronary heart disease.”

The study on stenting versus exercise come was a continuation of a pilot study first reported in 2004 in the journal Circulation. That study of 101 male patients found that after one year, 88% of patients who exercised had event-free survival compared with 70% of stented patients. The updated data reflect an additional 100 patients, who performed moderate intensity exercise for two weeks under hospital supervision, and then were given an exercise bike to continue their regimen at home. Patients with stable angina exercised at 80% of their threshold, and that after four weeks of exercising, their angina threshold increased.

The clear message for patients is to get 30 to 60 min of moderate-intensity aerobic activity every day, noting that 30% of heart disease could be prevented by 2.5 hours of walking per week

Prevention strategy relies on lifestyle

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Prevention strategy relies on lifestyle

Stenting may not always be the answer to treating heart disease with stable coronary artery disease. A German study has shown that patients with stable coronary artery disease who were put on an exercise regimen had significantly higher rates of event-free survival than those who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In the study, 70% of patients in the exercise program had event-free survival — no stroke, heart attack, or death — compared with 50% of stented patients after four years. Exercise is an important part of any type of prevention, and it should be instituted for “anyone with stable coronary heart disease.”

The study on stenting versus exercise come was a continuation of a pilot study first reported in 2004 in the journal Circulation. That study of 101 male patients found that after one year, 88% of patients who exercised had event-free survival compared with 70% of stented patients. The updated data reflect an additional 100 patients, who performed moderate intensity exercise for two weeks under hospital supervision, and then were given an exercise bike to continue their regimen at home. Patients with stable angina exercised at 80% of their threshold, and that after four weeks of exercising, their angina threshold increased.

The clear message for patients is to get 30 to 60 min of moderate-intensity aerobic activity every day, noting that 30% of heart disease could be prevented by 2.5 hours of walking per week.

What type of a vegetarian are you?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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There are 4 main types of vegetarian diets:

  • Lacto–ovo–vegetarian consumes dairy products and eggs but no meat, poultry, or seafood
  • Lacto–vegetarian eats dairy products but not eggs, meat, poultry, or seafood
  • Ovo–vegetarian eats eggs but no dairy products, meat, poultry, or seafood
  • Vegan does not eat any animal products, including meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy products; many vegans will also avoid honey.

Vegetarian and plant–based diets are associated with a reduced risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer as well as increased longevity. Vegetarian diets are typically lower in fat, particularly saturated fats and higher in dietary fiber. They are also likely to include more whole grains, legumes, nuts, and soy protein, and together with the absence of red meat, this type of eating plan may provide many benefits for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic health problems, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Prevention strategy relies on lifestyle

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Stenting may not always be the answer to treating heart disease with stable coronary artery disease.

A German study has shown that patients with stable coronary artery disease who were put on an exercise regimen had significantly higher rates of event–free survival than those who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In the study, patients in the exercise program had higher event-free survival –– no stroke, heart attack, or death –– compared with stented patients after four years.

Exercise is an important part of any type of prevention, and it should be instituted for “anyone with stable coronary heart disease.”

The study on stenting versus exercise come was a continuation of a pilot study first reported in 2004 in the journal Circulation. That study of 101 male patients found that after one year, 88% of patients who exercised had event–free survival compared with 70% of stented patients.

The updated data reflect an additional 100 patients, who performed moderate intensity exercise for two weeks under hospital supervision, and then were given an exercise bike to continue their regimen at home.

Patients with stable angina exercised at 80% of their threshold, and that after four weeks of exercising, their angina threshold increased.

The clear message for patients is to get 30 to 60 minutes of moderate–intensity aerobic activity every day, noting that 30% of heart disease could be prevented by 2.5 hours of walking per week.

Prevention strategy relies on lifestyle

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Prevention strategy relies on lifestyle

Stenting may not always be the answer to treating heart disease with stable.

A German study has shown that patients with stable coronary artery disease who were put on an exercise regimen had significantly higher rates of event–free survival than those who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In the study, 70% of patients in the exercise program had event-free survival –– no stroke, heart attack, or death –– compared with 50% of stented patients after four years.

Exercise is an important part of any type of prevention, and it should be instituted for “anyone with stable coronary heart disease.”

The study on stenting versus exercise come was a continuation of a pilot study first reported in 2004 in the journal Circulation. That study of 101 male patients found that after one year, 88% of patients who exercised had event–free survival compared with 70% of stented patients.

The updated data reflect an additional 100 patients, who performed moderate intensity exercise for two weeks under hospital supervision, and then were given an exercise bike to continue their regimen at home.

Patients with stable angina exercised at 80% of their threshold, and that after four weeks of exercising, their angina threshold increased.

The clear message for patients is to get 30 to 60 minutes of moderate–intensity aerobic activity every day, noting that 30% of heart disease could be prevented by 2.5 hours of walking per week.

Prevention Strategy Relies on Lifestyle

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Prevention Strategy Relies on Lifestyle

Stenting may not always be the answer to treating with stable heart disease.

A German study has shown that patients with stable coronary artery disease who were put on an exercise regimen had significantly higher rates of event–free survival than those who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In the study, 70% of patients in the exercise program had event–free survival –– no stroke, heart attack, or death –– compared with 50% of stented patients after four years.

Exercise is an important part of any type of prevention, and it should be instituted for “anyone with stable coronary heart disease.”

The study on stenting versus exercise come was a continuation of a pilot study first reported in 2004 in the journal Circulation. That study of 101 male patients found that after one year, 88% of patients who exercised had event–free survival compared with 70% of stented patients.

The updated data reflect an additional 100 patients, who performed moderate intensity exercise for two weeks under hospital supervision, and then were given an exercise bike to continue their regimen at home.

Patients with stable angina exercised at 80% of their threshold, and that after four weeks of exercising, their angina threshold increased.

The clear message for patients is to get 30 to 60 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity every day, noting that 30% of heart disease could be prevented by 2.5 hours of walking per week.

Crowd management and stampede prevention

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Most major crowd disasters can be prevented by simple crowd management strategies.
  2. One answer is use of barriers.
  3. However barriers in some cases may funnel the crowd towards an already–packed area, such as in the Hillsborough disaster. Hence barriers can be a solution in preventing or a key factor in causing a stampede.
  4. Use loudspeakers to communicate and direct a crowd.
  5. Warning signs of a crowd crush include density of more than four people per square meter, at which each person is being touched on four sides.
  6. To avoid or escape from a crowd crush, one is advised to move sideways, particularly between swells.
  7. After the stampede in the Victoria Hall disaster in 1883, a law was passed in England which required all public entertainment venues to be equipped with doors that open outwards.

Probiotics For Prevention Of The Common Cold

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A meta-analysis of 10 randomized trials compared probiotics (strains of lactobacilli, bifidobacterium, and propionibacterium) with placebo for the prevention of upper respiratory tract infections showed that probiotics decreased the rate of acute respiratory infections but they had no significant effect on the duration of symptoms.

Higher-quality trials that include older adults are needed before it can be determined whether probiotics have a role in the prevention of respiratory tract infections in adults. [Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2011; :CD006895.]