Sub Logo

Dr K K Aggarwal

All diabetics must get an eye check up done

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on All diabetics must get an eye check up done

The vast majority of diabetic patients who develop diabetic retinopathy (eye involvement) have no symptoms until the very late stages (by which time it may be too late for effective treatment). Because the rate of progression may be rapid, therapy can be beneficial for both symptom amelioration as well as reduction in the rate of disease progression, it is important to screen patients with diabetes regularly for the development of retinal disease. The eyes carry important early clues to heart disease, signaling damage to tiny blood vessels long before symptoms start to show elsewhere. Diabetic people with retinopathy are more likely to die of heart disease over the next 12 years than those without it. As per a study from the University of Sydney and the University of Melbourne in Australia and the National University of Singapore, people with retinopathy are nearly twice as likely to die of heart disease as people without it. People with these changes in the eyes may be getting a first warning that damage is occurring in their arteries, and work to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. Patients with retinopathy have a greater risk of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, including heart attack, stroke, revascularization, and CVD death, compared with those without retinopathy.

The woman is at risk if

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on The woman is at risk if

  1. Her father or brother below age 55 or her mother or sister below age 65 have had a heart attack, stroke, angioplasty or bypass surgery.
  2. She is over 55 years old. (After age 65, the death rate increases sharply for women)
  3. She smokes or is exposed to second-hand smoke every day.
  4. Her blood pressure is over 135/85 mm Hg. Optimal blood pressure is 120/80 mm Hg. Drug therapy is indicated when blood pressure is >140/90 mm Hg, or an even lower blood pressure in the setting of chronic kidney disease or diabetes (> 130/90 mm Hg).
  5. She does not exercise for at least 30 minutes that includes moderate–intensity physical activity, like taking a brisk walk, on most days. For weight control, women need to exercise for 60–90 minutes with moderate–intensity activity on most days.
  6. She has diabetes. After age 45, diabetes affects many more women than men. If diabetic, aim to achieve glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level less than 7%.
  7. Her HDL (High Density Lipoprotein or “good” cholesterol) is less than 50mg/dL.
  8. LDL goals are dependent upon risk. The following levels of lipids and lipoproteins in women should be encouraged through lifestyle approaches: LDL–C <100mg/dL; HDL–C >50mg/dL; triglycerides <150mg/dL and non–HDL–C (total cholesterol minus HDL cholesterol) <130 mg/dL. If a woman is at high risk or has hypercholesterolemia, intake of saturated fat should be <7% and cholesterol intake <200 mg/d. For diabetic women, LDL should be <100. For vascular disease and very high risk women, LDL should be<70. HDL of 60 mg/dL is considered cardioprotective. One can raise HDL by taking in 2–3 tbsps of olive oil daily, quitting smoking, getting regular aerobic exercise and maintaining a healthy weight.
  9. She is overweight by 20 pounds or more (More than one–third of women are more than 20 pounds overweight.)
  10. Either natural or through surgery, early menopause, before the age of 40 is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease.
  11. Taking birth control pills greatly increases risk of heart attack and stroke, especially after age 35.
  12. She has a high demand/low control job with sustained high levels of stress. Stress is a normal part of life.
  13. A healthy diet consists of eating fruits, vegetables and whole grain high–fiber foods (aim for 5 servings of vegetables and 2 servings of whole fruit daily); eating fish, especially oily fish, at least twice a week; limiting saturated fat to < 10% of energy, and if possible to <7%, cholesterol to <300 mg/dL. Limiting alcohol intake to no more than 1 drink per day; limiting sodium intake to <2.3 g/d (approximately 1 tsp salt) and avoiding all trans–fatty acids (listed as “hydrogenated oil” in the ingredients section)
  14. Pregnant and lactating women should avoid eating fish potentially high in methylmercury.
  15. Having at least three of a cluster of symptoms that are listed below put her at risk:
  1. High blood sugar >100 mg/dL after fasting
  2. High triglycerides, at least 150 mg/dL
  3. Low HDL (<50 mg/dL in women)
  4. Blood pressure of 130/85 or higher
  5. Waist >35 inches (Waist measurement of 35 inches or more or waist–to–hip ratio greater than 0.80 is a predictor of high triglycerides and low HDL levels).

Air pollution can raise blood pressure

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Air pollution can raise blood pressure

Breathing polluted air for even 2 hours can increase blood pressure, potentially raising the risk of cardiovascular disease in those exposed to smog.

In susceptible patients this small increase may actually be able to trigger a heart attack or stroke. In a study, which appeared in the journal Hypertension, researchers tested 83 people as they breathed levels of air pollution similar to those in an urban city near a roadway. The air pollution caused diastolic pressure (lower number in a blood pressure reading) to rise within 2 hours. Blood vessels were impaired for as long as 24 hours. Tests showed that microscopic particles in the air, rather than ozone gases, caused the rise in blood pressure and impaired blood vessel function. If air pollution levels are forecasted to be high, those with heart disease, diabetes or lung disease should avoid unnecessary outdoor activity.

Blood vessels were impaired for as long as 24 hours. Tests showed that microscopic particles in the air, rather than ozone gases, caused the rise in blood pressure and impaired blood vessel function. If air pollution levels are forecasted to be high, those with heart disease, diabetes or lung disease should avoid unnecessary outdoor activity.

Some tips from HCFI to prevent stroke

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Some tips from HCFI to prevent stroke

Stroke is preventable. About 90% of strokes are associated with 10 risks factors that are modifiable.

  1. Control high blood pressure
  2. Do moderate exercise 5 times a week
  3. Eat a healthy balanced diet high in fruits and vegetables and low in sodium
  4. Reduce your cholesterol
  5. Maintain a healthy BMI or waist-to-hip ratio
  6. Stop smoking and avoid second hand exposure
  7. Reduce alcohol intake
  8. Identify and treat atrial fibrillation
  9. Reduce your risk from diabetes talk to your doctor
  10. Get educated about stroke

Lifestyle tips from HCFI

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Lifestyle tips from HCFI

  1. Quit smoking and drinking as they are two major factors in causing damage to the heart.
  2. Manage your cholesterol levels as any imbalance in this can lead to a heart attack or stroke.
  3. Keep a check on vitals such as blood pressure and blood sugar. Any fluctuations in these can directly impact the heart in the longer term.
  4. Ensure that you get at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day.
  5. Achieve and maintain a healthy weight
  6. Eat a variety of healthy food including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

Caffeine�Alcohol combination in paralysis

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Caffeine�Alcohol combination in paralysis

A drug caffeinol containing caffeine and alcohol may help stroke patients recover.

In a small study at Texas Health Science Center in Houston, 60% of stroke patients who were given the drug, had no or minimal disability when they were discharged from the hospital. In contrast, only 26% of stroke survivors given standard therapy with tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, fared that well.

Caffeinol contains about as much caffeine as 5 to 7 cups of good, strong New Orleans coffee and the equivalent of two shots of alcohol.

The study involved 100 people who had suffered an ischemic stroke. All received intravenous tPA; 10 were also given an infusion of caffeinol. Caffeinol allows cells to tolerate reduced blood flow longer, thereby giving tPA a longer opportunity to do its action.

Will these findings be applicable to heart attack? Only time will tell as heart attack treatment is also done with tPA.

Use painkillers with caution in the elderly

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Use painkillers with caution in the elderly

Painkillers can cause stroke via irregular heart rhythm. Non selective non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs NSAIDs and new generation selective COX 2 inhibitors commonly used to treat inflammation are now linked to an increased risk of irregular heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation AF as per a Danish Research of 32602 patients led by Professor Henrik Toft Sorensen at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark. These drugs are already linked to increased risk of heart attacks and strokes. And now through AF the risk gets intensified for stroke and new risk added of heart failure and death. In the study compared with non users new users first drug within 60 days of diagnosis showed 40 increased risk of AF with non selective NSAIDS and 70 increased risk with COX 2 inhibitors. This means four extra cases of AF per year per 1000 new users of non selective NSAIDS and seven extra cases of AF per 1000 new users of COX 2 inhibitors. The risk was highest in the elderly patients with chronic kidney disease or rheumatoid arthritis especially on COX 2 inhibitors. NSAIDs should be used very cautiously in older patients with a history of hypertension or heart failure.

Reduce your risk of stroke

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Reduce your risk of stroke

Stroke is preventable. About 90 of strokes are associated with 10 risks factors that are modifiable. 1. Control high blood pressure 2. Do moderate exercise 5 times a week 3. Eat a healthy balanced diet high in fruit vegetables low in sodium 4. Reduce your cholesterol 5. Maintain a healthy BMI or waist to hip ratio 6. Stop smoking and avoid second hand exposure 7. Reduce alcohol intake men 2 day women 1 day 8. Identify and treat atrial fibrillation 9. Reduce your risk from diabetes talk to your doctor 10. Get educated about stroke

Negative stress may lead to heart disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Negative stress may lead to heart disease

Marital disharmony and job dissatisfaction are the two main mental risk factors for the causation of heart attack. Many studies in the past have suggested that there is a strong correlation between a nagging wife and early heart attacks in men. Similarly, literature has shown that work–related stress is related to early onset of high blood pressure, diabetes, stroke and heart attacks. A study from University College, London has shown that chronically stressed workers have a 68% of higher risk of developing heart disease, especially in people under the age of 50. Whether stress–related chemical changes or stress–related behavior is linked to heart disease, is yet to be answered. Stress–related lifestyle involves eating unhealthy food, smoking, drinking and skipping exercises. Chemical changes related to chronic stress are increased levels of cortisol, epinephrine and norepinephrine. Amongst stress, negative stress is more dangerous than positive stress and amongst negative stress it is jealousy, anger and cynicism which are associated with heart attack. The answer lies in managing stress by acting on a personal situation and not reacting to it. In children the same type of stress, especially during exam days, can end up with anxiety, insomnia and suicidal attempts

Healthy obesity does not exist

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Healthy obesity does not exist

A recent research published online in the Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that individuals cannot be simultaneously overweight and physically fit. As BMI rose, so did the blood pressure, waist circumference and insulin resistance. As BMI increased, levels of HDL cholesterol, thought to protect against heart attack and stroke, decreased.

While participants who were either overweight or obese “may not yet have reached the points that define metabolic

 

Healthy obesity does not exist

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Healthy obesity does not exist

A recent research published online in the Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that individuals cannot be simultaneously overweight and physically fit. As BMI rose, so did the blood pressure, waist circumference and insulin resistance. As BMI increased, levels of HDL cholesterol, thought to protect against heart attack and stroke, decreased.

While participants who were either overweight or obese “may not yet have reached the points that define metabolic

Passive smoking can cause dementia

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Passive smoking can cause dementia

People exposed to secondhand smoke are at an increased risk of developing dementia. Smoking is already known to increase the risk for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

A study from Peninsula Medical School in Exeter, England published in the journal BMJ has shown that there is an association between cognitive function and exposure to passive smoking. The risk increases with the amount of exposure to secondhand smoke. For people at the highest levels of exposure, the risk is probably higher.

The study collected data on more than 4,800 nonsmokers who were over 50 years old and tested saliva samples from these people for levels of cotinine, a product of nicotine that can be found in saliva for about 25 hours after exposure to smoke. The researchers found that people with the highest cotinine levels had a 44% increased risk of cognitive impairment, compared with people with the lowest cotinine levels. And, while the risk of impairment was lower in people with lower cotinine levels, the risk was still significant.

Passive smoking is also associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart disease

Anger can be a trigger for Heart Attack or Stroke

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Anger can be a trigger for Heart Attack or Stroke

A flash of anger may precipitate heart attack or stroke in susceptible individuals within two hours of anger episode as per a systematic review showed by Murray Mittleman, Dr PH, of the Harvard School of Public Health, and colleagues in the European Heart Journal.

The relative risks estimated in this meta–analysis indicate that there is a higher risk of cardiovascular events after outbursts of anger among individuals at risk of a cardiovascular event, but because each episode may be infrequent and the effect period is transient, the net absolute impact on disease burden is extremely low. However, with increasing frequency of anger episodes, these transient effects may accumulate, leading to a larger clinical impact.

In pooled results of four of the studies, the risk of MI or acute coronary syndrome was 4.74–fold higher in the hours after an outburst. One study evaluated intracranial hemorrhage and showed that the risk was higher in the hour after a bout of anger.

Mediated through increases in circulating catecholamines, increased myocardial oxygen demand, coronary vasospasm, and increased platelet aggregability, anger can cause transient ischemia, disruption of vulnerable plaques, and increased thrombotic potential.

Meditation May Reduce Death, Heart Attack And Stroke In Heart Patients

By
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Meditation May Reduce Death, Heart Attack And Stroke In Heart Patients

1. Twice-a-day Transcendental Meditation helped African Americans with heart disease reduce risk of death, heart attack and stroke.

2. Meditation helped patients lower their blood pressure, stress and anger compared with patients who attended a health education class.

3. Regular Transcendental Meditation may improve long-term heart health.

African Americans with heart disease who practiced Transcendental Meditation regularly were 48 percent less likely to have a heart attack and stroke or die from all causes compared with African Americans who attended a health education class over more than five years, according to new research published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Those practicing meditation also lowered their blood pressure and reported less stress and anger. And the more regularly patients meditated, the greater their survival, said researchers who conducted the study at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute funded the study. [Medline]

SSRIs Linked to Stroke

By
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on SSRIs Linked to Stroke

Use of SSRI conferred a small, but statistically significant risk of brain hemorrhage, according to an analysis of multiple epidemiologic studies. SSRI users had a 40% to 50% increase in the relative risk of intracranial and intracerebral hemorrhage compared with people who had never taken one of the drugs, according to Daniel G. Hackam, MD, PhD, and Marko Mrkobrada, MD, of the University of Western Ontario in Hamilton.