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Dr K K Aggarwal

5 steps to lower Alzheimers risk

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Maintain a healthy weight
  2. Check your waistline
  3. Eat mindfully
  4. Exercise regularly
  5. Keep an eye on important health numbers (cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, blood sugar)

(Source: Harvard Healthbeat)

5 Steps to Lower Risk of Alzheimer�s disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Check your waistline.
  •  Eat mindfully. Emphasize on colorful, vitamin–packed vegetables and fruits; whole grains; fish, lean poultry, tofu, and beans and other legumes as protein sources plus healthy fats. Cut down on unnecessary calories from sweets, sodas, refined grains like white bread or white rice, unhealthy fats, fried and fast foods, and mindless snacking. Keep a close eye on portion sizes, too.
  • Exercise regularly. Aim for 2½ to 5 hours weekly of brisk walking. Or try a vigorous exercise like jogging for half that time.
  • Keep an eye on important health numbers. In addition to watching your weight and waistline, keep a watch on your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure and blood sugar numbers.

Heart disease starts in youth

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Autopsy studies of young people who died in accidents have shown that by the late teens, the heart blockages, the kind of lesions that cause heart attacks and strokes are in the process of developing The best opportunity to prevent heart disease is to look at children and adolescents and start the preventive process early. More than a third of children and adolescents are overweight or obese. The first signs that men are at higher risk of heart disease than women appear during the adolescent years despite the fact that boys lose fat and gain muscle in adolescence, while girls add body fat. Between the ages of 11 and 19, levels of triglycerides, a type of blood fat associated with cardiovascular disease, increase in the boys and drop in the girls. Levels of HDL cholesterol, the “good” kind that helps keep arteries clear, go down in boys but rise in girls. Blood pressure increases in both, but significantly more in boys. Insulin resistance, a marker of cardiovascular risk, which is lower in boys at age 11, rises until the age of 19 years. Any protection that the young women have for cardiovascular protection can be wiped out by obesity and hence obesity in girls at any cost should be handled on priority.

Cholesterol tips

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Blood lipid levels may exhibit mild seasonal variation with a drop in the summer and total cholesterol level peaking in the winter. The variation can be up to 5 mg/dL Serum total and HDL-cholesterol can be measured in fasting or non-fasting individuals. There are only small clinically insignificant differences in these values when measured in the fasting or non-fasting state.

The total cholesterol can vary by 4 to 11 percent within an individual due to multiple factors including stress, minor illness and posture. Values may also vary between different laboratories, with data suggesting that a single measurement of serum cholesterol can vary as much as 14 percent. Therefore in an individual with “true” serum cholesterol concentration of 200 mg/dL the range of expected values is 172 to 228 mg/dL.

More than one measurement of total cholesterol should therefore be obtained when treatment considerations demand a precise determination. Measurement of serum HDL-C and triglycerides may demonstrate even greater variability.

A standard serum lipid profile consists of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and HDL-cholesterol. Lipid profile should be performed after 12 to 14 hours of fasting to minimize the influence of postprandial hyperlipidemia. One can use either plasma or serum specimen. The serum cholesterol is approximately 3 percent lower than the plasma value.

 


5 Steps to Lower Risk of Alzheimer’s disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on 5 Steps to Lower Risk of Alzheimer’s disease

• Maintain a healthy weight.

• Check your waistline.

• Eat mindfully. Emphasize colorful, vitamin–packed vegetables and fruits; whole grains; fish, lean poultry, tofu, and beans and other legumes as protein sources plus healthy fats. Cut down on unnecessary calories from sweets, sodas, refined grains like white bread or white rice, unhealthy fats, fried and fast foods, and mindless snacking. Keep a close eye on portion sizes, too.

• Exercise regularly. Aim for 2½ to 5 hours weekly of brisk walking. Or try a vigorous exercise like jogging for half that time.

• Keep an eye on important health numbers. In addition to watching your weight and waistline, keep a watch on your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure and blood sugar numbers.

A mix of exercise protocol is better

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A combination of weight training and aerobic exercise is the best prescription for overweight patients at risk for diabetes and heart disease.

Only aerobic exercise is also good as it reduces weight and inches off the waistlines. Jut weight lifting alone has very little benefit.

According to a study published in the American Journal of Cardiology, people in the weight-training group gained about 1.5 pounds and those in the aerobic group lost an average of 3 pounds and half an inch from their waists. Those who did both weight and aerobic training dropped about 4 pounds and 1 waistline inch. This group also had lower diastolic lower blood pressure as well as a decline in metabolic syndrome score. Both the aerobic-only group and the combined-exercise group also lowered their levels of bad triglycerides.

Cholesterol tips released

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Cholesterol tips released

Blood lipid levels may exhibit mild seasonal variation with a drop in the summer and total cholesterol level peaking in the winter. The variation can be up to 5 mg/dL.

Serum total and HDL–cholesterol can be measured in fasting or non–fasting individuals. There are only small clinically insignificant differences in these values when measured in the fasting or non–fasting state.

The total cholesterol can vary by 4 to 11 percent within an individual due to multiple factors including stress, minor illness and posture. Values may also vary between different laboratories, with data suggesting that a single measurement of serum cholesterol can vary as much as 14 percent. Therefore in an individual with “true” serum cholesterol concentration of 200 mg/dL the range of expected values is 172 to 228 mg/dL.

More than one measurement of total cholesterol should therefore be obtained when treatment considerations demand a precise determination. Measurement of serum HDL–C and triglycerides may demonstrate even greater variability.

A standard serum lipid profile consists of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and HDL–cholesterol. Lipid profile should be performed after 12 to 14 hours of fasting to minimize the influence of postprandial hyperlipidemia. One can use either plasma or serum specimen. The serum cholesterol is approximately 3 percent lower than the plasma value.

5 steps to lower Alzheimer’s risk (HealthBeat)

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on 5 steps to lower Alzheimer’s risk (HealthBeat)

  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Check your waistline.
  • Eat mindfully. Emphasize colorful, vitamin–packed vegetables and fruits; whole grains; fish, lean poultry, tofu, and beans and other legumes as protein sources; plus healthy fats. Cut down on unnecessary calories from sweets, sodas, refined grains like white bread or white rice, unhealthy fats, fried and fast foods, and mindless snacking. Keep a close eye on portion sizes, too.
  • Exercise regularly. Aim for 2½ to 5 hours weekly of brisk walking (at 4 mph) or try a vigorous exercise like jogging (at 6 mph) for half that time.
  • Keep an eye on important health numbers. In addition to watching your weight and waistline, keep a watch on your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and blood sugar numbers.

Fast For 12 Hours If Going For A Cholesterol Test

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1. Getting a cholesterol test is easy.

2. Food and drinks affect cholesterol profile. Fast for 12 hours to get accurate readings of LDL (“bad” cholesterol), HDL (“good” cholesterol), and triglyceride levels.

3. Avoid drinking alcohol for at least 24 hours before the test.

Tell your doctor

  1. Flu or another illness shortly before the blood test can have a dramatic effect on your cholesterol levels.
  2. A change in diet in the last one week can make a difference. High levels of alcohol or carbohydrates can raise triglycerides.
  3. Did you forget to fast or sneak something to eat or drink before the test?  It can affect the cholesterol levels.
  4.  An underactive or overactive thyroid can affect cholesterol levels.