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Dr K K Aggarwal

The inseparable pairs in Vedanta

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Luv-Kush, Shubha-Labha, Riddhi-Siddhi are inseparable pairs of Vedanta. They signify that you cannot get one without the help of the other.

In Luv-Kush, Kush is a symbol of purity and Luv symbolize the spiritual love. To achieve love one has to be pure in consciousness. To acquire love and inner happiness in life, one may have to use kush, a herb, in daily life. No traditional Hindu ritual is complete without the use of kush grasses.

Kush is a benevolent satvik detoxifying grass, a symbol of progress and alertness. The word “kushal buddhi” originates from the word kush. In Bhagavad Gita (shloka 6.10) Krishna said that for meditation one should sit on a seat covered with kush grass. The Garuda Purana also described the importance of kush grass in rituals of Panchak death and in cremation of a person whose body has not been found as in natural calamities, by making an effigy of kush grass and completing the rituals. Kush grass is often held in the hands before taking a sankalp.

Kush grass is called Imperata cylindrica Beauv. It is a clean, pure, brittle grass with acrid, cooling, oleaginous, aphrodisiac and diuretic properties. Kush sharbat is a drink routinely used by traditional healers of Chattisgarh.

In Riddhi-Siddhi, Riddhi is knowledge and Siddhi is perfection. An obstacle-free life (represented by Ganesha) can be attained only when one masters or tames both knowledge and perfection.

Riddhi and Siddhi are the two inseparable wives of Lord Ganesha.

Some symbolize Siddhi as success and Riddhi as prosperity or Riddhi as material abundance and Siddhi as the intellectual and spiritual prowess or Riddhi as prosperity and Siddhi as progress. All are dependent on each other.

Ganesha is said to have two sons, Shubha-Labha. Again the two terms are inseparable from each other. Both the words are written during Diwali on each account book. Shubha is auspiciousness and Labha, profit.

Ram Lakshman are often spoken of as Ram-Lakhan, which signifies that to be in touch with consciousness (Rama) one has to control the mind with an aim (Mana with a Lakshya).

Other pairs, which are inseparable, are Rama and Sita, Radha and Krishna, Shiva and Parvati, Brahma and Saraswati and Vishnu and Lakshmi.

In Rama-Sita, Rama signifies soul consciousness and Sita, the body. It is true for the Krishna and Radha combination. They also signify the dual character of the nature, feminine and masculine natures.

In Brahma and Saraswati, Brahma represents creativity or innovations and Saraswati the art of acquiring pure knowledge. Again both are dependent on each other.

Lakshmi and Vishnu are again inseparable. Vishnu or Krishna is the doer and performer. They signify action in the present. Lakshmi signifies material and spiritual benefits. One can only get the benefits by action in dharma.

Shiva-Parvati is other inseparable word used in Vedic literature. The other is Shiva and Shakti. They represent the true nature of the consciousness, the male and the female energies; the purusha and the prakriti. In terms of computer language, they represent the operational and the application software. No computer can run without both. One is knowledge or the information and the other is energy.

Other uncommon pairs are Bharata and Shatrughana of Ramayana. Bharata represents bhakti, devotion and discipline and Shatrughana, victory over the enemy. To win over the Shatru, one has to become Bharata.

In Mahabharata, there is the pair of Nakul (being neutral) and Sahdeva (helping every one). Again they are inseparable. You cannot help unless you are neutral.

The pairs of modern post Vedic era are Heer-Ranjha, Laila-Majnu, Sheeri-Farhad, Banti and Babli and Veer-Zara. They all symbolize human love relationship

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

The inseparable pairs in Vedanta

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on The inseparable pairs in Vedanta

Luv-Kush, Shubha-Labha, Riddhi-Siddhi are inseparable pairs of Vedanta. They signify that you cannot get one without the help of the other.

In Luv-Kush, Kush is a symbol of purity and Luv symbolize the spiritual love. To achieve love one has to be pure in consciousness. To acquire love and inner happiness in life, one may have to use kush, a herb, in daily life. No traditional Hindu ritual is complete without the use of kush grasses.

Kush is a benevolent satvik detoxifying grass, a symbol of progress and alertness. The word “kushal buddhi” originates from the word kush. In Bhagavad Gita (shloka 6.10) Krishna said that for meditation one should sit on a seat covered with kush grass. The Garuda Purana also described the importance of kush grass in rituals of Panchak death and in cremation of a person whose body has not been found as in natural calamities, by making an effigy of kush grass and completing the rituals. Kush grass is often held in the hands before taking a sankalp.

Kush grass is called Imperata cylindrica Beauv. It is a clean, pure, brittle grass with acrid, cooling, oleaginous, aphrodisiac and diuretic properties. Kush sharbat is a drink routinely used by traditional healers of Chattisgarh.

In Riddhi-Siddhi, Riddhi is knowledge and Siddhi is perfection. An obstacle-free life (represented by Ganesha) can be attained only when one masters or tames both knowledge and perfection.

Riddhi and Siddhi are the two inseparable wives of Lord Ganesha.

Some symbolize Siddhi as success and Riddhi as prosperity or Riddhi as material abundance and Siddhi as the intellectual and spiritual prowess or Riddhi as prosperity and Siddhi as progress. All are dependent on each other.

Ganesha is said to have two sons, Shubha-Labha. Again the two terms are inseparable from each other. Both the words are written during Diwali on each account book. Shubha is auspiciousness and Labha, profit.

Ram Lakshman are often spoken of as Ram-Lakhan, which signifies that to be in touch with consciousness (Rama) one has to control the mind with an aim (Mana with a Lakshya).

Other pairs, which are inseparable, are Rama and Sita, Radha and Krishna, Shiva and Parvati, Brahma and Saraswati and Vishnu and Lakshmi.

In Rama-Sita, Rama signifies soul consciousness and Sita, the body. It is true for the Krishna and Radha combination. They also signify the dual character of the nature, feminine and masculine natures.

In Brahma and Saraswati, Brahma represents creativity or innovations and Saraswati the art of acquiring pure knowledge. Again both are dependent on each other.

Lakshmi and Vishnu are again inseparable. Vishnu or Krishna is the doer and performer. They signify action in the present. Lakshmi signifies material and spiritual benefits. One can only get the benefits by action in dharma.

Shiva-Parvati is other inseparable word used in Vedic literature. The other is Shiva and Shakti. They represent the true nature of the consciousness, the male and the female energies; the purusha and the prakriti. In terms of computer language, they represent the operational and the application software. No computer can run without both. One is knowledge or the information and the other is energy.

Other uncommon pairs are Bharata and Shatrughana of Ramayana. Bharata represents bhakti, devotion and discipline and Shatrughana, victory over the enemy. To win over the Shatru, one has to become Bharata.

In Mahabharata, there is the pair of Nakul (being neutral) and Sahdeva (helping every one). Again they are inseparable. You cannot help unless you are neutral.

The pairs of modern post Vedic era are Heer-Ranjha, Laila-Majnu, Sheeri-Farhad, Banti and Babli and Veer-Zara. They all symbolize human love relationship

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

If you hate somebody, it means you have a lot of time to waste

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on If you hate somebody, it means you have a lot of time to waste

If you hate somebody, it only means that you have lot of meaningless time to spare. If you are busy and live in the present, you cannot think of the past or the future.

There is a well-known saying in Vedanta that you cannot hate strangers, you only can hate somebody whom you loved and withdrawal of love is what hatred is.

Love and hate, therefore, are the two sides of the same coin. You cannot have both. You need to make an effort to hate somebody but love is always spontaneous. It is not true that if you love somebody, it means that you have a lot of time to spare. Love comes from the heart and not from the mind or the intellect.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

What are the two basic truths of Vedanta?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Two Hindu principles that symbolize the outcome of freedom of thought were conceptualized some 4000 years back by unnamed rishis in Rig–Veda which say, “This world is one family” (Vasudaiva Kutumbakam) and that “The Universal Reality is the same, but different people can call it by different names” (Ekam Sat Viprah Bahuda Vadanti).

In these two statements made in ancient Hindu India, we see the seeds of globalization and freedom of thought.

Most religions teach belief in one God. Judaism, Christianity and Islam are, in fact, Semitic religions essentially speaking of One God. Even Hinduism that talks of many gods, in its highest form speaks only of One God.

This was defined in the Sanskrit verse in the Rig Veda: Ekam Sat Vipra Bahuda Vadanti (The Truth is One, but scholars call it by many names).

“Vasudaiva Kutumbakam” defines that you and me are not different from each other and we are the part of the same web of life. The same spirit is shared by you and me and we are just the two sides of the same coin. And hence, it adds on to say, how can there be any conflict between us?

The truth is one, but is perceived differently because different people are at different levels of evolution in spiritual terms. Everybody perceives it with their level of understanding and perception. For an uneducated village society, even an entry of intelligent person in the village will be perceived as of GOD.

Vedanta upholds the reality of this indivisible, immanent and transcendent truth called Spirit. Vedanta denotes one’s identity with the rest of humanity. According to it, there is no stranger in this world. Everyone is related to one another in the kinship of the Spirit. In Vedanta, there is no ‘I’ and ‘for me’, but is ‘ours’ and ‘for us’; and ultimately ‘His’ and ‘for Him’.

If the Vedanta philosophy is rightly followed upon, it will obliterate all evils. It is the science of right living and it is not the sole monopoly of the Hindus. It is for all and it has no quarrel with any religion. It preaches universal principles and Vedanta is the only universal, and eternal religion. It is a great leveler and it unites all, giving room to all.



The inseparable pairs in Vedanta

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on The inseparable pairs in Vedanta

Luv-Kush, Shubha-Labha, Riddhi-Siddhi are inseparable pairs of Vedanta. They signify that you cannot get one without the help of the other. In Luv-Kush, Kush is a symbol of purity and Luv symbolize the spiritual love. To achieve love one has to be pure in consciousness. To acquire love and inner happiness in life, one may have to use kush, a herb, in daily life. No traditional Hindu ritual is complete without the use of kush grasses. Kush is a benevolent satvik detoxifying grass, a symbol of progress and alertness. The word “kushal buddhi” originates from the word kush. In Bhagavad Gita (shloka 6.10) Krishna said that for meditation one should sit on a seat covered with kush grass. The Garuda Purana also described the importance of kush grass in rituals of Panchak death and in cremation of a person whose body has not been found as in natural calamities, by making an effigy of kush grass and completing the rituals. Kush grass is often held in the hands before taking a sankalp. Kush grass is called Imperata cylindrica Beauv. It is a clean, pure, brittle grass with acrid, cooling, oleaginous, aphrodisiac and diuretic properties. Kush sharbat is a drink routinely used by traditional healers of Chattisgarh. In Riddhi-Siddhi, Riddhi is knowledge and Siddhi is perfection. An obstacle-free life (represented by Ganesha) can be attained only when one masters or tames both knowledge and perfection. Riddhi and Siddhi are the two inseparable wives of Lord Ganesha. Some symbolize Siddhi as success and Riddhi as prosperity or Riddhi as material abundance and Siddhi as the intellectual and spiritual prowess or Riddhi as prosperity and Siddhi as progress. All are dependent on each other. Ganesha is said to have two sons, Shubha-Labha. Again the two terms are inseparable from each other. Both the words are written during Diwali on each account book. Shubha is auspiciousness and Labha, profit. Ram Lakshman are often spoken of as Ram-Lakhan, which signifies that to be in touch with consciousness (Rama) one has to control the mind with an aim (Mana with a Lakshya). Other pairs, which are inseparable, are Rama and Sita, Radha and Krishna, Shiva and Parvati, Brahma and Saraswati and Vishnu and Lakshmi. In Rama-Sita, Rama signifies soul consciousness and Sita, the body. It is true for the Krishna and Radha combination. They also signify the dual character of the nature, feminine and masculine natures. In Brahma and Saraswati, Brahma represents creativity or innovations and Saraswati the art of acquiring pure knowledge. Again both are dependent on each other. Lakshmi and Vishnu are again inseparable. Vishnu or Krishna is the doer and performer. They signify action in the present. Lakshmi signifies material and spiritual benefits. One can only get the benefits by action in dharma. Shiva-Parvati is other inseparable word used in Vedic literature. The other is Shiva and Shakti. They represent the true nature of the consciousness, the male and the female energies; the purusha and the prakriti. In terms of computer language, they represent the operational and the application software. No computer can run without both. One is knowledge or the information and the other is energy. Other uncommon pairs are Bharata and Shatrughana of Ramayana. Bharata represents bhakti, devotion and discipline and Shatrughana, victory over the enemy. To win over the Shatru, one has to become Bharata. In Mahabharata, there is the pair of Nakul (being neutral) and Sahdeva (helping every one). Again they are inseparable. You cannot help unless you are neutral. The pairs of modern post Vedic era are Heer-Ranjha, Laila-Majnu, Sheeri-Farhad, Banti and Babli and Veer-Zara. They all symbolize human love relationship

The Infinite Powers of the Spirit

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Om Poornamadah

“Om Poornamadah Poornamidam

Poornaat Poornamudachyate

Poornasya Poornamaadaaya

Poornameva Avasihyate”

‘The whole is whole; if you take away the whole away from the whole the whole will still remain.’ (That is infinite, this is infinite, from the infinite, the infinite has come out. Having taken the infinite out of the infinite, the infinite alone remains).

(In Vedanta, “That” represents superconsciousness, God or the Brahman and “This” the visible universe)

Atman, which makes up our body, is 99.99 per cent space or void and if we look at the rest, it is also nothing but space or void. This void or ‘akasha’ is what is called Brahman, God or consciousness and is a web of energized information.

This web of information of inner space called inner consciousness is the Atman or the Soul. This is connected with the outer space in the universe having a similar web of energized information called the Spirit or Brahmand.

The Spirit has been given many names by different religions: Allah, Buddha, Brahman , Christ  or Wahe Guru . They all signify the same. This spirit, the energized field of information, is a powerful expression of live energy which can move faster than the speed of light. Soul is nothing but an individualized expression of the spirit.

This energy containing information in the spirit cannot be seen, felt, touched, tasted or smelt. It is beyond the perception of the five senses. One cannot destroy it with a weapon, fire, water or air. This consciousness is embedded in the space of each and every cell of the body. It is like sugar added to the milk. Once added, you cannot find it as it gets embedded with each and every drop of the milk.

Soul originates from the spirit. Each soul differs from the other by way of the subtle layer of consciousness called the ‘Sukshma Sharir’, which is controlled by the triad of actions, memories and desires.

Spirit is like the light, which is always positive and removes darkness. The basic nature of consciousness is “truth and bliss”. The soul and the spirit are devoid of hatred, anger or jealousy and are full of unconditional love. They are nothing but a treasury of information about everything. This infinite information is capable of doing anything, including miracles.

It is like the flame of a candle, which can light an infinite number of candles, while still retaining its illumination to the same degree.

Deepak Chopra once said that the soul is like the voice of Lata Mangeshkar coming through a radio, and if you break the radio, you will not find Lata Mangeshkar in it. Similarly, if you cut the body into pieces, you cannot find the physical presence of the spirit. Spirit is omnipresent and any amount of Spirit taken out from it will not make any difference to it.

In religious terms, the infinite or the vastness is equated and described by the blue color, and that is one reason why most gods are represented in blue color, or are shown in the background of blue sky. This only represents the vastness and infinite character of the consciousness.

Aguru explained  the  spirit to his disciples by the following equation: 1 x 1 = 1, 1/1=1 or, in other words everything is One. One can also explain it by the equation that infinity when added, subtracted, multiplied or divided by infinity will result only in infinity.

This infinite potential in our minds is present in between the thoughts and can be experienced by enabling oneself to go in between the thoughts by a process called meditation. One can experience the silent gap between the thoughts either with the use of primordial sound mantra as a vehicle or by way of yoga. People who have learnt meditation and have achieved the ability to go into the silent gaps can accomplish everything in their life using the principles of intention and attention. After any intention is introduced in the silent gap, a new reality can be created.

“That which is born of the flash is a flash; that which is born of the spirit is spirit”

(John)

If You Hate Somebody It Means You Have a Lot of Time to Waste

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If you hate somebody, it only means that you have lot of meaningless time to spare. If you are busy and live in the present, you cannot think of the past or the future.

There is a well known saying in Vedanta that you cannot hate strangers, you only can hate somebody whom you loved and withdrawal of love is what hatred is.

Love and hate, therefore, are the two sides of the same coin. You cannot have both. You need to make an effort to hate somebody but the love is always spontaneous. It is not true that if you love somebody, it means that you have a lot of time to spare. The love comes from the heart and not from the mind or the intellect.

 

The Four Purusharthas: Dharma, Artha, Karma and Moksha

Purusha means human being and artha means object or objective. Thus Purusharthas means objectives of a man.

Here, ‘Purusha’ does not mean a male in its physical sense of the word. It means any soul in its differentiated form. The Purusharthas are applicable to both men and women.

According to Vedanta, a person should strive to achieve four main objectives (Purusharthas) in his life. They are:

  • Dharma (righteousness)
  • Artha (material wealth)
  • Kama (desire)
  • Moksha (salvation)

Every person is expected to achieve these four objectives and seek fulfillment in life before death. The four principles can be summarized as “acquiring material wealth through righteousness to fulfill the desires of acquiring inner happiness”

The word dharma means, “To hold together”. It represents “any act” of omission or commission, which holds people together in the society. The purpose of earning money should be to hold one’s dharma and the money should be earned using the principles of dharma.

Moksha is the very purpose of life and in broader sense denotes acquiring inner happiness. The same can only be acquired using the principles of duty, discipline and devotion. Only if the desire or intention to acquire one’s happiness is focused on it one can get it. Intention and attention are thus the main two tools of acquiring any thing in life. With right intention and focused attention, one can overcome all adversities in life.

These main principles also enlighten us about the message of the Trimurti: Brahma, Vishnu and Mahesh (Shiva), the three Gods of our existence. Brahma teaches us about Dharma, Vishnu about righteous earning and Mahesha about fulfilling the desires.

All the four Purusharthas are also related to the Ashrams of life; Bramhacharya Ashram with dharma, Grasthya Ashram with Artha, Vanprastha Ashram with Kama and Sanyasa Ashram with the Moksha.

Vedic texts are available on each of the objective: Dharmashastra, Arthashastra, Kamashastra and the Upanishads.

Summary
“Using dharma to earn money which in turn can be spent on fulfilling the desire to get inner happiness” or “Fulfilling one’s desire of inner happiness using the means earned through righteous earning.”

Dr Karan Singh, a Vedanta Scholar based on his teachings on Sri Aurobindo’s philosophy in one of the talks summarized the essence of Vedas and Upanishads in the following six statements.

1. The God exists. God is all pervasive, eternal force which cannot be burnt by fire, cut by a weapon, wetted by water or dried by air. This energized information-based external force is called Brahman.
2. That the consciousness within us is the localized version of the same Brahman and is called soul.
3. That it is possible to have a union between soul and spirit or Brahman. Vedanta stresses the idea of self effort. It encourages every individual to realize God within by the practice of certain methods called Yoga which channels the tendencies we already possess and lead us to God.

The ideal path is to practice a harmonious balance of these four yogas:
• Bhakti Yoga: This is the cultivation of a devotional relationship with God through prayer, ritual and worship.
• Jnana Yoga: This Yoga is the approach to God through discrimination and reasoning. The goal is complete freedom. All of our miseries in life are caused by seeing difference, and so the jnana yogi tries to break through this delusion by seeing God everywhere.
• Karma Yoga: The path to God through selfless service to others is Karma Yoga.
• Raja Yoga: This is sometimes called the yoga of meditation. It is the soul of all the yogas. The emphasis here is on tuning the mind to God and truth through concentration and mediation.

Internal Yoga: Sri Aurobindo coined another term called ‘integral yoga’ which is a mixture of all four to acquire the union with the divinity.

4. Vedic philosophy talks about two important concepts. Vasudaiva kutumbakam” (whole world is one family) and “Ekam Sat Viprah Bahudavanti” (truth is one but the wise call it by various names). It clearly states that there is only one God but people may call Aim by different names and that the whole world is a family, where you and I carry the same spirit, an extension of Brahman. Here it talks about the essential unity of all religions. All ultimately lead to union with the divinity.
5. It teaches the message of helping the others. One of the basic prayers also emphasizes on this concept.
Om Sarve Sukhina Santoo,
Sarve Santoo Niramaya,
Sarve Bhadrani Pashyantu,
Na Kaschida Dookh Bhav Bhavet.”

(May all beings be happy, May all beings be without illness, May even the thoughts of unhappiness be banished from all).

Vedic philosophy emphasizes on the welfare for all. It talks about “bahujan hitay-bahujan sukhay” (‘the good of the masses, the benefit of the masses.)’

6. Essence of Vedanta:
• First the man’s real nature is divine; he is a spiritual being in human form.
• The aim of human life is to realize the divine nature
• That all religions aim at the same destination though the process or path may be different.