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Dr K K Aggarwal

Understanding the Gunas

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The mental state of a person in Vedic language is described in terms of gunas. The present state of mind of any person is a result of mixing of three gunas of nature called tamas, rajas and satoguna. In terms of states of mind, they are called tamas, rajas and satva and the nature of a person is described as tamsik, rajsik and satwik.

Whether it is Vedas, Upanishads, Bhagwad Gita or the text of Ayurveda, all talk about these gunas. The sankhya philosophy also says that a mixture of the three makes the cosmic mind as well as the human mind. Bhagwad Gita talks in great detail about the nature, yagna as well as diet depending upon these gunas.

A satwik diet enhances satoguna in a person and makes him/her with a predominant satwik nature. The same is true for the other two gunas. According to Ayurvedic texts and in Atharvaveda. any food that comes from the roots or underground part of the tree, is tamsik in nature. Tamsik foods should not be eaten raw. They should either be slow cooked or soaked in water for hours before consumption.

Foods which are from the top part of the tree like coconut, fruits, leaves and flowers are satwik in nature and can be consumed fresh, as they are. Food which comes from the middle part of the tree is often rajsik in nature.

Fresh, soaked, sprouted, natural food are often satwik, while left over foods are tamsik in nature. Most satwik foods are naturally white.

Ramayana also has characters with different nature. Kumbhakaran represents a person with tamsik nature, Meghnad and Ravana with rajsik nature and Vibhishan with satwik nature. One can see that the diet of Kumbhakaran was left over foods, onions, radish, carrots and non vegetarian food, all are tamas producing.

Shastras also teach us about satwik food. In Vedic knowledge, God is represented by the consciousness and whatever is offered to God is the one, which is offered to consciousness and hence all offerings to God are soul healing and soul nurturing food items. Only satwik foods are offered to God as one can live on satwik food forever. Examples are dry fruits, fruits and milk. One cannot live on rajsik or tamsik food hence, they have to be taken in moderation only.

The offerings to God include honey, milk, curd, fruits and vegetables, etc. Panchamrit, offered in Puja, a mixture of milk, curd, ghee, honey and sugar, is a classic example.

Yogashastra also talks about the role of satwik diet in great detail. It says people who eat less are yogis, people who eat in moderation are bhogis and people who eat a lot are rogis. The synonymous are tamsik for rogis, rajsik for bhogis and satwik for yogis.

In terms of proper diet, one should eat dinner lighter than lunch, eat only natural food in the night and follow the principles of moderation and variety.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

The Right Action

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Dharma is the path of righteousness and living ones life according to the codes of conduct as described by the Vedas and Upanishads. Its western equivalents might include morality, ethics, virtue, righteousness and purity. The term dharma can best be explained as the “law of being” without which things cannot exist.

The word dharma is derived from dhri, which means “to hold”. It literally means “that which holds” the people of this world and the whole creation. The same is described in the Vedic Text, in Atharva Veda as: Prithivim dharmana dhritam, i.e. “this world is upheld by dharma”.

In Hinduism, Dharma is the very foundation of life. Tulsidas, the author of Ramcharitmanas, defined the root of dharma as compassion. Buddha has also described this principle in his book Dhammapada. According to Hindu philosophy, its GOD who holds us through “Truth” and/or “Love”. “Dharma prevails” or “truth prevails” is the essence of Hinduism.

In order to achieve good karma, Vedas teach that one should live according to dharma (the right action). This involves doing what is right for the individual, the family, the class or caste and also for the universe.

According to the Bhagavata Purana, righteous living or life on a dharmic path has four pillars: truthfulness (satya), austerity (tap), purity (shauch) and compassion (daya). It further adds that the adharmic or unrighteous life has three main vices: pride (ahankar), bad company (sangh), and intoxication (madya).

Manusmriti prescribes ten essential rules for the observance of dharma: Patience (dhriti), forgiveness (kshama), piety or self-control (dama), honesty (asteya), sanctity (shauch), control of senses (indriya–nigrah), reason (dhi), knowledge or learning (vidya), truthfulness (satya) and absence of anger (krodha). Manu further writes, “Non-violence, truth, non–coveting, purity of body and mind, control of senses are the essence of dharma”.

In Bhagwata Gita, Lord Krishna says that in the society dharma is likely to fall from time to time, and to bring dharma back, a GOD representative is born from time to time.

The shloka “parithraanaaya saadhoonaam vinaasaaya cha dhushkr.thaamdharma-samsthaapanaarthaaya sambhavaami yuge yuge” (Chapter IV – 8)” says that “For the protection of the virtuous, for the destruction of evil-doers, and for establishing the rule of righteousness (Dharma), I am born from age to age [in every age]”. Another shloka “yada yada hi dharmasya glanir bhavati bharata abhyutthanam adharmasya tadatmanam srjamy aham” means that O descendant of Bharata “Whenever and wherever there is a decline in religious practice, and a predominant rise of irreligion – at that time I descend Myself”.

Deepak Chopra in his book Seven Spiritual Laws of Success talks about the “Law of ‘Dharma’ or Purpose in Life’”. According to him, everybody should discover his or her divinity, find the unique talent and serve humanity with it. With this, one can generate all the wealth that one wants.

According to him, when your creative expressions match the needs of your fellow humans, then wealth will spontaneously flow from the un–manifest into the manifest, from the realm of spirit to the world of form. In spiritual terms this is an attempt to find out whether one’s life is progressing as per the Laws of Dharma (Dharma in Sanskrit means ‘purpose in life’) which, according to the scriptures, is said to be the sole purpose for a human being to manifest in this physical form.

For one to achieve ‘DHARMA’ he suggests the following affirmative exercises:

  1. Today I will lovingly nurture the god or goddess in embryo form that lies deep within my soul. I will pay attention to the spirit within me that animates both my body and my mind. I will awaken myself to this deep stillness within my heart. I will carry this consciousness of timeless, eternal being in the midst of time-bound experiences.
  2. I will make a list of my unique talents. Then I will list all of the things I love to do while expressing my unique talents. When I express my unique talents and use them in the service of humanity, I lose track of time and create abundance in my life as well as in the lives of others.
  3. I will ask myself daily, ‘How can I serve?’ and ‘How can I help?’ The answers to these questions will allow me to help and serve my fellow human beings with love.

Karma, dharma and samsara are three fundamental aspects of Hinduism. Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism are all built on these aspects. Dharma is one’s appropriate role or attributes. Karma measures how well one performs one’s dharma, explains why one is born where he or she is, and why there is suffering and seeming injustices. Samsara is the continuous cycle of birth, death and rebirth, and the context for all experience.

Dharma sutras from Dharma Shãstras are the basic texts which talks about the morality of individuals and the society. Most Indian laws are made from these Shãstras.

In Jainism also, the wheel of Dharma (Chakra) with 24 spokes represents the religion preached by the 24 Tirthankaras consisting of nonviolence (Ahimsa) and other virtues.

The very first word of the Gita is “Dharma”. The Gita concludes with the word “Mama”. The whole of Bhagavad Gita is contained in the two words ‘Mama’ and ‘Dharma’. When you join these two words it becomes mamadharma, meaning ‘your true Dharma’. This is what the Gita teaches. ‘What is your Dharma?’

How to achieve your dharma?

  1. Do unto others what you do unto yourself and satisfy your conscience. That is your Dharma.
  2. The word ‘Living Dharma’ signifies right action in every moment of the life.
  3. Do not follow the dictates of body, and do not indiscriminately follow the mind, for the mind is like a mad monkey. Hence, follow the conscience.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Is the origin of ISO Certification from the Vedas?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Whatever you say or do means you are ISO certified.

In mythology, truthfulness means that you do what you think or say. ISO therefore is a Vedic stamp for truthfulness.

You need ISO certification in Kalyug as majority being Kalyugis will not do what they say or think.

In traditional old business times, people conducted their transactions on verbal assurances but today every one works on written agreements. The saying was “Prana Jaye per vachan na jaye”.

 

 

Is the origin of ISO Certification from the Vedas?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Is the origin of ISO Certification from the Vedas?

Whatever you say or do means you are ISO certified. Whatever you say or do means you are ISO certified In mythology, truthfulness means that you do what you think or say. ISO therefore is a Vedic stamp for truthfulness. You need ISO certification in Kalyug as majority being Kalyugis will not be doing what they say or think. In traditional old business times, transactions were done on verbal assurances but today every one works on written agreements. “Prana Jaye per vachan na jaye” was a very common saying in those times.

Is the origin of ISO Certification from the Vedas?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Is the origin of ISO Certification from the Vedas?

Whatever you say or do means you are ISO certified.

In mythology, truthfulness means that you do what you think or say. ISO therefore is a Vedic stamp for truthfulness. You need ISO certification in Kalyug as majority being Kalyugis will not be doing what they say or think.

In traditional old business times, transactions were done on verbal assurances but today every one works on written agreements. The saying was “Prana Jaye per vachan na jaye”.

Is the origin of ISO Certification from the Vedas?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Is the origin of ISO Certification from the Vedas?

Whatever you say or do means you are ISO certified.

In mythology, truthfulness means that you do what you think or say. ISO therefore is a Vedic stamp for truthfulness.

You need ISO certification in Kaliyuga as majority being Kaliyugi will not be doing what they say or think.

In traditional old business times, people used to transact on verbal assurances but today every one works on written agreements. The saying was “Prana Jaye per vachan na jaye”.

Saraswati Vandana

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Saraswati = one who gives the essence (sara) of the true self (swa)

Sanskrit Mantra

Yaa Kundendu tushaara haaradhavalaa, Yaa shubhravastraavritha|

Yaa veenavara dandamanditakara, Yaa shwetha padmaasana||

Yaa brahmaachyutha shankara prabhritibhir Devaisadaa Vanditha|

Saa Maam Paatu Saraswatee Bhagavatee Nihshesha jaadyaapahaa||

English Translation

“May Goddess Saraswati, who is fair like the jasmine-colored moon, and whose pure white garland is like frosty dew drops; who is adorned in radiant white attire, on whose beautiful arm rests the veena; whose throne is a white lotus; and who is surrounded and respected by the Gods protect me. May you fully remove my lethargy, sluggishness, and ignorance.”

 Saraswati Vandana is the first ritual performed whenever we hold any educational seminar. She represents the Goddess of knowledge. In Vedantic terms ‘knowledge’ means knowing about true self or the consciousness.

 The Goddess Saraswati is incarnated as a lady figure sitting on a lotus. She has four hands. She holds the sacred scripture (Vedas) in one hand and a lotus or a rosary in the other. With the third and the fourth hands she plays the Indian flute or veena, and sometimes a PEACOCK is shown standing nearby.

 Worshipping Saraswati means, adhering to its principles in day-to-day life. When these principles are applied for self- realization these are called INTERNAL principles and when applied for external knowledge (say your profession), these are external principles. In both situations the basic principles are the same.

 In the process of learning or teaching, the first thing is the TRUTH. Lotus with its white colour and the white cloths of Ma Saraswati in Vedic symbolic language represents TRUTH. What one learns or teaches has to be TRUTH and FACT based. It has to be true to one’s consciousness. One has to get firmly established in it. One has to make TRUTHFULNESS as a vehicle for the journey towards acquiring knowledge.

For acquiring self-happiness (true knowledge) or seeking the acquired knowledge about any subject, one can use either of the two pathways; firstly, the path of knowledge (Gnana Marg) and secondly the path of duty, devotion and discipline’ (Bhakti Marga).

The path of knowledge is important but the most difficult. By reading Vedas alone (for internal) or text books (for external) one cannot acquire the full knowledge. If this was true, no schools or colleges were required and one could have learnt sitting at home. Books and Vedas form the basis for everything but alone are not sufficient. This path of knowledge is shown by the Goddess holding the sacred Vedic book made of palm leaves (a small book) in her left hand.

The second path of learning is the path of doing your duty with devotion and discipline. This basically means listening carefully to the person giving a lecture (teacher or Guru) and sticking to what is said as discipline. With the single pointed devotion to what has been learnt, one can master the subject. The Goddess playing the Veena in two hands represents this path. As while playing or listening veena, you get absorbed in it, similarly during any learning or teaching act, you must get absorbed in it. This is the easiest path to acquire knowledge, as hardly any intellect is required (the earlier path is totally dependent on the intellect.

Once one has acquired the knowledge, implementation of the third and the last path of Karma (Karamyoga) can complete the process of learning.

It is saying ‘what you listen – you forget, what you speak – you remember; and what you do – you learn. Practicing with detachment to its fruits, using the principles of actions, contemplation (doing it again and again at same time) and repeated attempts (again and again over time) makes one perfect.

The Goddess holding the rosary in the right hand represents the path of action (contemplation and repeated actions). In the symbolic representation of the Goddess, the Veena is shown as a big object compared to rosary or the Vedas which convey that the listening of the seminar with full concentration and devotion is more important than reading about the subject or later implementing it.

The four hands have varied interpretations. It means strength and control over the mind, intellect, ego and consciousness.

One cannot create anything unless one has the knowledge of how and what to create. Knowledge is the fundamental prerequisite for creation. In Hindu mythology Brahma represents the creative force. Knowledge and Creation being inseparable, Saraswati is symbolized as being the wife of Brahma.

The peacock is symbolized by vastness (blue color) and loss of ego or pride (vanity). While learning (which is a vast subject) one must become egoless, then only the true learning will be acquired.

Saraswati has been compared to a mother as a mother looks after all the sons with equality. In learning and teaching, one has to treat everyone as equal and give more importance to the weakest students.

Some times she is shown to be sitting on swan which means ‘VIVEK’ or developing the power of discrimination between good and bad. The teacher must have those qualities of what to include in a presentation and what not to include.

If one starts thinking that I know more than the teacher, or the teacher starts behaving as if he is the ultimate, what one gets is a limited knowledge. Learning is an everlasting process and one has to shed his or her ego in this process.

After the Saraswati Vandna in any seminar, the custom is to light the lamp. It means, to initiate the learning process, which is nothing but removal of darkness or ignorance from our mind. Lighting the lamp here means removing the darkness.

Remember two Vedic principles while learning or teaching and ask the following four questions to your mind while making a presentation:

  • Is it necessary?
  • Is it the truth?
  • Will it add to the knowledge of others?
  • Has it helped me in my day-to-day Karmic life?

If the answer to any of the above is no, do not include it in your presentation.

The mental state of a person in Vedic language is described in terms of gunas. The present state of mind of any person is a result of mixing of three gunas of nature called Tamoguna, Rajoguna and Satoguna. In terms of states of mind they are called Tamas, Rajas and Satwa and the nature of a person is called Tamsic, Rajsic and Satvic.

Vedas, Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita and Ayurveda all talks about these gunas. The Sankhya philosophy also says that a Read more

The word for “routine” in Sanskrit, the language of the Vedas, is “ritam.” Another translation of “ritam” is “rhythm.” Most people think of “routine” as dull and boring. But “rhythm”, means music! Rhythm has a tempo, a beat, a pulse and is alive.

Ritam (rhythm), Bhara (full of), Pragya (mind), in other words means a “mind full of rhythm”. It represents a state of mind where the thought waves are synchronous with the order of the universe. It is also the state of the mind where the microcosm and macrocosm are in coherence with each other.

It has been said that people who meditate acquire many powers like telepathy, reverse telepathy, spontaneous fulfillment of desires, meaningful coincidences, synchrodestiny etc. From where do these powers come?

Our consciousness or the soul is the silent state of mind with infinite powers. These powers are hidden under the smoke of mind, intellect and ego, which in turn are controlled by the software of action, memory and desires.

The interface between these two layers, the disturbed and the undisturbed state of consciousness, is what the “ritam bhara pragya” is. Once you are in this state, the intention becomes powerful, and one starts experiencing spontaneous fulfillment of desires.

In the Vedas, this term is loosely translated as “a state where only truth is known”. It is said that if one can be conscious in this state, a desire can be manifested, as it is right at the level of manifestation into the physical plane. This is also the level where one experiences Siddhis, or the super normal powers described by Patanjali in the Yoga Sutras.

This consciousness level is the “interface” between the most refined condition of the relative one and the absolute one. It is perceptible only if the intellect is perfectly pure and is overshadowed by nothing. When during meditation one becomes non local, one experiences it. Sometimes one has the rare luck to dive into this level.

Any question, which is asked at this level is immediately, is completely and truly answered. It works like a gigantic, cosmic and all-knowing computer.

Meditation can raise the consciousness level from the limited (‘seemit’) individualized I-ism to the unlimited universal ‘aham’ and helps to develop this ritam bhara pragya in which the untrue, unholy and aberrant thoughts do not occur.

In meditation, the conscious mind comes to the simplest form of human awareness, where consciousness is open to itself. This self-referral state of consciousness is the unified field of natural law.

Through the regular practice of Meditation for 15-20 minutes twice daily, the infinite creativity and perfect orderliness of the unified field becomes increasingly lively in daily life. At the same time, meditation gives deep rest and releases stresses that impede the optimal functioning of mind, body, and behavior.

At this level, coincidences occur which are called ‘meaningful coincidences’. In Deepak Chopra’s terminology, this state is called “Acausal Atemporal Non Local Quantum Mechanical Interrelatedness.”