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Dr K K Aggarwal

Eating Out Tips

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Curb portions: Always order for one if you are two people and if you are alone set aside some of what is on your plate to bring home.
  • Resist refined carbohydrates.
  • Load your plate with colorful choices at the salad bar with vegetables, fruits and small amounts of lean protein. Skip the creamy and ranch dressings.
  • Choose dishes that are grilled, roasted, steamed, or sautéed.
  • Don’t be afraid to request a salad, vegetables, or fruit instead of starchy side dishes.
  • If you are a non–vegetarian, order only fish or seafood.
  • If you decide to have dessert, share it with your dining companion(s).

Eating Out Tips

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Eating Out Tips

  • Curb portions: Always order for one if you are two people and if you are alone set aside some of what is on your plate to bring home.
  • Resist refined carbohydrates.
  • Load your plate with colorful choices at the salad bar with vegetables, fruits, and small amounts of lean protein. Skip the creamy dressings.
  • Choose dishes that are grilled, roasted, steamed, or sautéed.
  • Don’t be afraid to request a salad, vegetables, or fruit instead of starchy side dishes.
  • In non–vegetarian food, order only fish or seafood.
  • If you decide to have dessert, share it with your dining companion(s).

Fruit and Vegetable Safety at home

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Wash your hands, kitchen utensils, and food preparation surfaces, including chopping boards and countertops, before and after preparing fruits and vegetables.
  • Clean fruits and vegetables before eating, cutting, or cooking, unless the package says the contents have been washed.
  • Wash or scrub fruits and vegetables under running water—even if you do not plan to eat the peel—so dirt and germs on the surface do not get inside when you cut.
  • Cut away any damaged or bruised areas before preparing or eating.
  • Dry fruit or vegetables with a clean paper towel.
  • Keep fruits and vegetables separate from raw foods such as meat, poultry and seafood.
  • Refrigerate fruits and vegetables you have cut, peeled, or cooked within 2 hours (or 1 hour if the outside temperature is 90°or warmer). Chill them at 40°F or colder in a clean container.

(Source: CDC)

Eating Out Tips

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Curb portions: Always order for one if you are two people and if you are alone set aside some of what is on your plate to bring home.
  • Resist refined carbohydrates.
  • Load your plate with colorful choices at the salad bar with vegetables, fruits and small amounts of lean protein. Skip the creamy and ranch dressings.
  • Choose dishes that are grilled, roasted, steamed, or sautéed.
  • Don’t be afraid to request a salad, vegetables, or fruit instead of starchy side dishes.
  • If you are a non–vegetarian, order only fish or seafood.
  • If you decide to have dessert, share it with your dining companion(s).

Some tips to prevent cervical cancer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Reduce your chances of getting infected with the human papillomavirus (HPV) by avoiding sexual contact with multiple partners without adequate protection.
  2. Get a Pap test done every 3 years as timely detection can help in curing this condition.
  3. Quit smoking right away. Nicotine and other components found in cigarettes may pass through the blood stream and get deposited in the cervix where they can alter the growth of cervical cells. Smoking can also suppress your immune system making it more susceptible to HPV infections.
  4. Eat a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
  5. Maintain a healthy weight as being overweight or obese increases the risk of insulin resistance, which may lead to type 2 diabetes and increase the risk of developing cancer

Some health tips from HCFI

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Achieve and maintain a healthy weight for your height.
  2. Exercise regularly.
  3. Eat a diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
  4. Limit sodium intake to under 2,300 milligrams a day (one teaspoon of salt), and get plenty of potassium (at least 4,700 mg per day) from fruits and vegetables.
  5. Drink alcohol in moderation, if at all.
  6. Reduce stress.
  7. Monitor your blood pressure regularly, and work with your doctor to keep it in a healthy range.

Eating Out Tips

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Eating Out Tips

  1. Curb portions: Always order for one if you are two people and if you are alone set aside some of what is on your plate to bring    home.
  2. Resist refined carbohydrates.
  3. Load your plate with colorful choices at the salad bar with vegetables, fruits, and small amounts of lean protein. Skip the creamy dressings.
  4. Choose dishes that are grilled, roasted, steamed, or sautéed.
  5. Don’t be afraid to request a salad, vegetables, or fruit instead of starchy side dishes.
  6. In non–vegetarian food, order only fish or seafood.
  7. If you decide to have dessert, share it with your dining companion(s).

5 Steps to Lower Risk of Alzheimer�s disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Check your waistline.
  •  Eat mindfully. Emphasize on colorful, vitamin–packed vegetables and fruits; whole grains; fish, lean poultry, tofu, and beans and other legumes as protein sources plus healthy fats. Cut down on unnecessary calories from sweets, sodas, refined grains like white bread or white rice, unhealthy fats, fried and fast foods, and mindless snacking. Keep a close eye on portion sizes, too.
  • Exercise regularly. Aim for 2½ to 5 hours weekly of brisk walking. Or try a vigorous exercise like jogging for half that time.
  • Keep an eye on important health numbers. In addition to watching your weight and waistline, keep a watch on your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure and blood sugar numbers.

Avoid food poisoning by thorough washing and proper cooking

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Thorough washing and proper cooking of fruits and vegetables can eliminate most bacteria that cause food poisoning.
Food-borne illnesses or food poisoning usually occurs due to eating food that is contaminated with bacteria or their toxins.
Virus and parasites can also be cause food poisoning. People have known for long that raw meat, poultry and eggs can also harbor diseases causing microbes. But in recent years most outbreaks of food borne illnesses have been due to fresh fruits and vegetables.
Food poisoning can cause abdominal pain, nausea, headache, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration. Symptoms may appear several hours to several days after eating tainted food. For example, Salmonella bacteria will cause illness 12 hours to 3 days after ingestion lasting about 4-7 days.
The most common way to treat food poisoning is to drink plenty of fluids. The sickness usually subsides within a few days.

Diet is linked to the diabetes epidemic

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A study published in the journal Diabetes Care, has highlighted the importance of the whole diet rather than focusing on certain foods or food groups that might be beneficial. A diet rich in whole grains, fruits and vegetables (leafy green), nuts and low-fat dairy may help people lower their risk of type 2 diabetes by 15% over 5 years than those who ate the lowest amounts of these foods. Also, a diet which contains high amounts of red meat, high-fat dairy and refined grains like white bread may boost the odds of diabetes development by 18%. Type 2 diabetes is closely linked to obesity and it is well-known that maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise reduces the risk of developing the disease. Diet affects diabetes risk independent of a person’s weight.

Can diabetes be prevented?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Adhering to a Mediterranean diet, rich in fruits and vegetables and low in animal products, may protect one against developing type 2 diabetes. The diet emphasizes olive oil, vegetables, fruits, nuts, cereals, legumes and fish, and de-emphasizes meat and dairy products. It is a healthy eating plan that seems to help in the prevention of heart disease.

Moreover, the people who tended to stick closest to the diet were those with factors that put them at the highest risk for developing diabetes, such as being older, having a family history of diabetes and being an ex-smoker. These people were expected to have a higher rate of diabetes, but when they adhered to the Mediterranean diet this was not the case.

Type 2 diabetes is typically brought on by poor eating habits, too much weight and too little exercise.

One key factor that might be responsible for the protective effect of the Mediterranean diet is its emphasis on olive oil for cooking, frying, putting on bread and mixing in salad dressings.

Tips to prevent diabetes

1. Eat less

2. Omit refined carbohydrates (white sugar, white rice and white maida)

3. Use olive oil, vegetables, fruits, nuts, cereals, legumes and fish, and reduce meat and dairy products.


Food poisoning with rice dishes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Staph and Bacillus cereus can cause acute food poisoning within 6 hours of ingestion of food. B. cereus is likely when rice is the culprit.

• B. cereus is able to persist in food processing environments due to its ability to survive at extreme temperatures as well as its ability to form biofilms and spores.

• B. cereus has been recovered from a wide range of foods, including rice, dairy products, spices, bean sprouts and other vegetables.

• Fried rice is an important cause of emetic–type food poisoning associated with B. cereus.

• The organism is frequently present in uncooked rice, and heat–resistant spores may survive cooking.

• Cooked rice subsequently at room temperature can allow vegetative forms to multiply, and the heat-stable toxin that is produced can survive brief heating such as stir frying.

• Two distinct types of toxin-mediated food poisoning are caused by B. cereus, characterized by either diarrhea or vomiting, depending on which toxin is involved. The diarrheal toxin is produced by vegetative cells in the small intestine after ingestion of either bacilli or spores. The emetic toxin is ingested directly from contaminated food. Both toxins cause disease within 24 hours of ingestion.

• The emetic syndrome is caused by direct ingestion of the toxin.

• The number of viable spores and vegetative bacteria that produce diarrheal toxin is reduced by heating, although spores associated with emetic toxin are capable of surviving heat processing.

• Cereulide is heat stable and resistant to gastric conditions.

• The ingested toxin itself may therefore cause disease despite sufficient heating to kill B. cereus.

• The emetic syndrome is characterized by abdominal cramps, nausea, and vomiting. Diarrhea also occurs in about one–third of individuals. Symptom onset is usually within 1 to 5 hours of ingestion, but it can also occur within half an hour and up to six hours after ingestion of contaminated food.

• Symptoms usually resolve in 6 to 24 hours.

• Rice–based dishes in particular have been implicated in emetic toxin mediated disease, usually as a result of cooling fried rice dishes overnight at room temperature followed by reheating the next day.

• The infective dose of cereulide required to cause symptoms is 8 to 10 micrograms per kilogram of body weight.

3 diet changes to help lower cholesterol levels (Harvard)

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If you have high cholesterol (a total cholesterol level of 240 milligrams per deciliter of blood or above), taking steps to lower it can greatly reduce your chances of having a heart attack. For every 10% drop in your cholesterol level, your heart attack risk falls by 20% to 30%.

• Choose healthy fats. Avoid saturated fats, which increase unhealthy LDL levels and steer clear of trans fats, which both raise LDL and lower protective HDL. Instead, substitute healthier unsaturated fats found in fish, nuts, and vegetable oils.

• Go with whole grains. Whole–grain breads, pastas, and cereals help prevent a blood sugar roller coaster and make you feel full longer. Many of these foods contain fiber, which can help lower LDL levels.

• Make other healthy choices. Eat more fruits and vegetables. Ideally, substitute these for processed foods and sweets. Choose fat–free milk instead of whole milk. Opt for low–fat yogurt and pick brands that are not loaded with sugar.

Why should we eat seasonal fruits and vegetables?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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God has grown only those fruits and vegetables, which are necessary in that season in that particular location. For example, during summer, the body requires more liquids and regular flushing of the kidney because of extreme heat so that dehydration does not damage kidney. To prevent this, nature produces vegetables and fruits in this season that are juicier and increase urination.


All summer fruits e.g. mango, litchi, watermelon, musk melon, wood apple (bel), etc. are juicy fruits. All vegetables grown in summer such as bottle gourd (ghiya), snake gourd (torai), apple gourd (tinda) grow on creepers and they all have a mild diuretic action.

In summer, where the humidity is not so high like in Delhi, one need not take coconut water, which is only required as a treatment of humidity–related diseases. Therefore, nature grows coconuts only in the coastal areas.

Pollution and Diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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India may soon become the diabetes capital of the world. The number of diabetics diagnosed every year is increasing.

If we go back to the era of Ramayana and Mahabharata, we find none of the Devtas or Asurs suffering from diabetes. Though diabetes does get a mention in Ayurveda, its incidence and prevalence in Indian society was very low.

Today diabetes is considered to be a lifestyle disease and is linked to potbelly obesity. Lord Ganesha and Kuber both had potbelly obesity yet did not suffer from diabetes. Lord Ganesha had an uncontrolled appetite to eat sweets and yet he had no diabetes and same comes from one of his prayers, which talks about why people in that era did not suffer from diabetes. Following is a gist of one of my write–ups on the same: “Gajananam Bhoota Ganadi Sevitam; Kapittha Jambu phalasara bhakshitam; Umasutam Shoka Vinasha karanam; Namami Vighneswara pada pankajam”. The Mantra means

  • “Oh Elephant–faced, worshiped by the existing beings, of all living beings, tasting the elephant apple (kaith) and jambolana (jamun), the Son of Uma, destroyer of grief, I bow to the lotus feet of Ganesha who is lord of all” or
  • Gajananam (the big tummy one worshipped by all) Bhoota (Durva grass and Bilva patra used for worshipping Ganesha) Ganadi (in equal quantity) Sevitam (if consumed); Kapittha (Kaith ) Jambu (Jamun) phalasara (fruits) bhakshitam (to be consumed); Umasutam (son of Uma) Shoka (diseases) Vinasha karanam (get rid of); Namami (I bow to) Vighneswara (destroyer of grief) pada pankajam (feet of lord)”

The mantra talks about four medicinal herbs: Durva grass and Bilva patra (Bel leaves) used for Ganesha worship; fruit of elephant apple (Kaith) and fruit of Jambolona (Jamun). All four have anti diabetic properties and can be mixed in equal quantity and prepared as a medicinal juice.

Medically, Durva grass (Cynodon dactylon) has been shown to possess anti diabetic, cholesterol–lowering, immunomodulatory, DNA protective, aphrodisiac, male fertility, anti cancer and anti inflammatory activities. Similarly, Bilva Patra has both antidiabetic and fertility promoting properties.

Elephant apple (Limonia acidissima) also named as Wood Apple, Elephant Apple, Monkey Fruit, Curd Fruit, Koth Bel, Kaitha and Kath Bel, has been shown to possess strong anti diabetic properties.

Jamun (Syzygium cumini) also has DNA protective, antioxidant and antidiabetic properties and is an essential ingredient of most antidiabetic Ayurveda preparations.

Apart from the above, two things have also happened in the current Kaliyuga era, which deviate from the Vedic era. Firstly, environmental pollution and secondly people have chosen to eat carbohydrates on a daily basis and there is also a shift of complex carbohydrates to refined carbohydrates.

Environmental pollution, especially with high particulate matter PM 2.5 exposure, is linked with diabetes. Any particulate matter of less than 2.5 micro m3 in size can get absorbed from respiratory system, enter into the blood and release pro–inflammatory products leading to endothelial dysfunction and resultant diabetes and heart disease.

As per WHO, the air content of PM2.5 should be less than 10 μg/m3 but in India the levels are always more than 60 μg/m3as 60 μg/m3 concentration has been accepted as normal in India. This means that an Indian is already six times more exposed to PM 2.5 particulate.

In India, we can see values as high as 300–400 μg/m3 in selected areas on a daily basis. Constant exposure to PM 2.5 particulate matter leads to endothelial dysfunction, one of the major factors that increase the prevalence of diabetes.

As per Chandok Upanishad, food is Brahman. Food contains the same consciousness as that of human body. Fruits remain alive for up to 40 minutes after they are plucked from the tree unless they are refrigerated or frozen at the same time.

A fruit without consciousness is dead food and does not have protective nutritional value. PM2.5 particulates can also gets absorbed in the fruits, reducing its nutritional value.

If the same food is also devoid of consciousness, it will not be able to prevent and protect human being from various diseases.

To prevent oneself from diabetes, therefore, one should avoid eating refined carbohydrates, omit carbohydrates 80 days in a year from diet and avoid exposure to high PM2.5 pollution matter, exercise more and try to eat a diet full of fruits and vegetables which are live, locally grown and seasonal.