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Dr K K Aggarwal

Tips from HCFI for bone health

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • It is important to get enough Vitamin D as it helps in the absorption of calcium.
  • Some sources of this vitamin include milk, fortified orange juice, mushrooms, and egg yolk.
  • Get enough physical activity for about 30 minutes each day. There are exercises that can help increase bone strength and improve balance and coordination.
  • Limit the intake of caffeine as this can decrease the absorption of calcium
  • If you smoke or drink, it is a good idea to quit both these habits.

Precautions to stay healthy during the winter months

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • To prevent winter depression, one should either sit in the sunlight for long or stay in indoor spaces with illuminated light.
  • Early morning blood pressure is higher in winter than in the summer months. Therefore, people with high blood pressure should ask their doctor to increase their blood pressure medicine during the winters.
  • There are more heart attacks in the winter months than in the summer months and therefore, any chest pain especially in the morning in winter should not be ignored.
  • During the winter season, one should avoid food that is excessively sweet, sour or salty
  • Everyone should ask their doctor for pneumonia and flu vaccine.
  • Pneumonia during the winters can be deadly in very young and old people. The flu vaccine should be given to all those who are at high risk, especially, people with asthma, diabetes and heart diseases.
  • During the winters, one should avoid sleeping in closed rooms with electric gadgets like heaters on
  • One should check the earthing of all the electric devices especially the geyser
  • One should avoid using sugar while preparing sweets; instead one can use either Stevia or jaggery especially in Gajar Ka Halwa.
  • One should avoid switching from one temperature to another without giving their body time for adjustment.
  • Vitamin D is essential for good health. Each person should spend 40 minutes in the sunlight each day, especially before 10 am and after 4 pm.

Prevention is always better than cure. A little extra care can help make the holiday months, more enjoyable and heart healthy.

Dentists can diagnose

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Early mouth cancer
  2. Scurvy: In the mouth, scurvy can cause gums to swell, bleed and soften which can lead to tooth loss.
  3. Eating disorder: regular bouts of vomiting covers the teeth in strong gastric acid from the stomach that can wear down the tooths protective layer of enamel, causing teeth to become discolored, cracked and sensitive.
  4. Anemia: Ulcers at the corner of the mouth. A change in color of the gums and tongue
  5. Sinus infection: Infected sinuses can cause pain in the jaw and around the teeth, which can be mistaken for a toothache.
  6. Vitamin D is needed to absorb calcium which helps to prevent tooth decay and gum disease.
  7. Too little zinc can leave you open to gum disease, dry mouth and loss of sensation in your tongue.
  8. Low levels of vitamin B3, or niacin, can cause the tip of the tongue to become red and swollen
  9. Vitamin B2 – without it your tongue can become sore and your lips, red and shiny.
  10. B12 levels which can prevent bad breath, loss of taste and a fissured tongue.
  11. Diabetics are at a higher risk of early gum disease – gingivitis – and serious gum disease – periodontitis.
  12. Biting your nails: If you like a nibble, you are putting undue stress on your teeth, causing them to crack, chip and wear down.

Jaw pain, recessed gums and even headaches are other side effects caused by the grinding and clenching involved in nail biting, as well as the germs being passed into your mouth every time you feel like a nibble.

Some tips on Multiple sclerosis from HCFI

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Eat a healthy diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables, lean protein, and omega-3 fatty acids
  2. Movement of the body is crucial in patients with MS at every stage. Regular exercise promotes better flexibility, boosts balance, and can also help with common MS complications.
  3. Practice good sleep hygiene by sticking to a consistent sleep schedule, keeping the room dark and cool, avoiding too many fluids before bedtime, and creating a relaxing bedtime routine.
  4. Get plenty of Vitamin D. As per a recent research, people with MS who are vitamin D deficient tend to suffer more significant progression of the disease.
  5. Smoking is a big risk factor for having MS as well as for the worsening of the disease. Quit this habit as well as drinking to help manage symptoms.
  6. Talk to your near and dear ones if you feel depressed. This will help you feel better and positive. Try meditating for some time during the day.

Tips from HCFI for bone health

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. It is important to get enough Vitamin D as it helps in the absorption of calcium.
  2. Some sources of this vitamin include milk, fortified orange juice, mushrooms, and egg yolk.
  3. Get enough physical activity for about 30 minutes each day. There are exercises that can help increase bone strength and improve balance and coordination.
  4. Limit the intake of caffeine as this can decrease the absorption of calcium
  5. If you smoke or drink, it is a good idea to quit both these habits.

Tips for getting vitamin D from food

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The following foods are good sources of vitamin D.

  1. Cod liver oil: This oil comes from the liver of the cod fish and is considered extremely healthy. It helps ease joint pains and can be taken in capsule form or oil form.
  2. Mushrooms: If you love mushrooms, you are covered. Dried shitake mushrooms are a brilliant source of Vitamin D3 as well as Vitamin B. It is low in calorie and can be consumed daily.
  3. Salmon: This is another good source of D3, omega 3 and protein.
  4. Sunflowers seeds: They not only have vitamin D3 but also contain monounsaturated fats and protein

Science behind kalpvas

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The month of Magh is observed as Kalpvas where for one month people from all over gather, do sun worship (vitamin D), eat sesame (high in calcium) and do tulsi or basil pooja (high fertility and high in calcium). The significance behind is to accrue one year’s vitamin D quota. To make enough vitamin D we need to expose 40% of the body for at least 40 minutes at a stretch for 40 days in a year (Formula of 40).

Asthma and winter care: What can you do to protect yourself?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In case of patients who are suffering from asthma, the lungs become irritable and more reactive than before during winter months

While the sudden change in weather comes as a sign of relief for many, it also brings with it health implications especially for those suffering from pre-existing lifestyle diseases like asthma. It is essential that special care be taken during this time to be able to properly enjoy the winter season.

According to the World Health Organization, India is home to an estimated 20 million asthma patients. All of them suffer from moderate to severe cases of asthma and hence, it really becomes important for these patients to understand how a common virus can trigger a major asthma attack in the winter months.

To eradicate the dangers, one must understand what triggers asthma. We recommend that people must stay away from smoke filled rooms, highly polluted areas and spend more time in parks and amongst nature. Given that mites also trigger asthma, patients should use mite-proof covers on the mattresses and pillows. Special attention should also be paid to keeping ones house dry and cool so as to prevent mites and molds’ from growing. In addition to this, consuming a healthy diet and getting adequate exercise and vitamin D through sunlight is key to mainlining necessary immunity levels.

What can you do?

• Wash your hands regularly: The importance of maintaining hand hygiene has been stressed too often because it is one of the best and simplest ways to avoid catching and spreading common cold and flu viruses. Medical experts advise that an individual uses alcohol-based moist hand sanitizers; this trick will definitely shield you against the danger of catching germs as well.

• Avoid sitting by the fireplace: Lighting up a bonfire in chilly winters might sound as a great idea for a cozy day, but sitting really close to a fireplace or just near the heater might not be good for asthmatic patients. Smoke coming from the burning wood can harm your lungs and give you breathing issues aggravating an asthma attack.

• Get a flu shot: Although having asthma won’t make you susceptible to flu viruses, but these viruses can make asthma severe or worse in some patients. Getting a vaccine will keep your symptoms under control by protecting you from the harmful attacks of the virus.

• Clean the heater and replace the filters: A season off can cause a lot of germs to deposit inside the packed heaters and their filters. And once you start them without cleaning them, it can cause dust to blow through your nose and as well your house causing an asthma patient to develop an allergy. And hence, it is always advised that heaters should be cleaned and filters should be replaced before prepping up for a new season.

• Exercise indoor and warm up before starting up: Chilly waves can impact your lungs and might make it problematic to breathe and that’s why medical experts advise that patients should instead opt for a gym or exercise outdoors when the weather is a little warm. Innumerable studies have shown that the lungs of asthmatic patients work more efficiently when they warm up before starting up their exercise routine.

Science behind Chhath pooja

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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1. Chhath puja is mainly observed in Bihar and Nepal. Bihar has a number of Sun temples, flanked by a surajkund or sacred pool of the Sun. 2. It is a ritual bathing festival that follows a period of abstinence and ritual segregation of the worshiper (parvaitin) from the main household for four days. The parvaitin observes ritual purity, and sleeps on the floor on a single blanket. 3. This is the only festival which does not involve any priest. 4. The devotees offer their prayers to the setting sun, and then the rising sun. 5. It is the most glorious form of Sun worship. 6. The main worshippers (parvaitin) are women. 7. The parvaitin pray for the well-being of their family, for prosperity and for offspring. 8. The prasad offerings include sweets (Thekua) and fruit offered in small bamboo winnows. 9. The food is strictly vegetarian and it is cooked without salt, onions or garlic. 10. Day 1: Nahay khay (bathe and eat): The parvaitin take a dip in river. The house is cleaned. Only one meal is eaten and contains �kaddu-bhat� or channa dal, and arwa chawal (rice). 11. Day 2: Kharna (the day before Chhath): On Panchami, the parvaitins observe a fast till evening a little after sunset. Just after the worship of earth, the offerings of Rasiao-kheer (rice delicacy), puris (puffs of wheat flour) and bananas, are distributed. From time onwards, for the next 36 hours, the parvaitin goes on a fast without water. 12. Day 3: Chhath: Sanjhiya Arghya (evening offerings): The day is spent preparing the Prasad (offerings) at home. Offerings (Argh) are made in the evening to the setting sun. In the night a colorful event of Kosi is held. Here, lighted earthen lamps are kept under a canopy of five sugarcane sticks. The five sticks signify the human body made of five elements. 13. Day 4: Parna (day after Chhath): Bihaniya Aragh (next morning offerings): On this final day the parvaitin with family go to the riverbank before sunrise and offer (Aragh) to the rising sun. The festival ends with the breaking of the fast. Science behind the pooja 1.Sun worship in Kartik month is related to absorption of vitamin D. 2. Vitamin D comes from UVB rays. 3. These rays are predominant at sun set and sun rise. 4. Vitamin D deficiency today is running like an epidemic in the society. 5. Vitamin D is sued for absorbing calcium from the food. 6. All the food items used in this pooja are high in calcium. 7. Kartik is also high fertility months. Vitamin D deficiency is linked to infertility. 8. Natural calcium is better absorbed in fasting state. 9. Patients with compromised kidneys should not do this fast. 10. Fast is never broken with feast. This fast is usually broken with ginger and jaggery. (Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Vitamin D Facts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Calcium has an indispensable assistant in building bones: vitamin D. • Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium. • Increasing vitamin D can help prevent osteoporosis. • A small amount of sun exposure can help the body manufacture its own vitamin D. • Five to 30 minutes of sunlight between 10 am and 3 pm twice a week to your face, arms, legs, or back without sunscreen will enable you to make enough of the vitamin • People with fair skin that burns easily should protect themselves from skin cancer by limiting sun exposure to 10 minutes or less. • Food and sun exposure should suffice, but if not, get 2,000 IU of vitamin D daily from a supplement.

Do I need multivitamin tablets?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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1. Multivitamin tablets are not needed unless there is a scarcity of a particular vitamin.

2. If you include all seven colors and six tastes in your food, there is no need for vitamin supplementation.

3. Wheat grass and barley grass juice contain folic acid and vitamin B12.

4. Anything which is green contains vitamin B.

5. Anything which is red contains lycopene.

6. Citrus foods contain vitamin C.

7. All dry fruits contain vitamin E.

8. Sunlight is an excellent source of vitamin D.

9. Carrots contain vitamin A.

10. Folic acid is lost if the food is boiled and the water is discarded.

11. Vitamin D is not absorbed if exposed to sunlight is through glass.

12. Vitamin D is not absorbed through clothes if you are fully-clothed in sunlight.

Vitamin D intake associated with reduced risk for Crohn’s disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Increased intake of vitamin D may significantly reduce the risk for Crohn’s disease (CD) in women, according to an article published in the journal Gastroenterology. This study involved 72,719 women who returned the 1986 questionnaire. They had data on both vitamin D intake and physical activity and did not have a history of CD or UC. Diagnosis of CD was based on a typical history of 4 weeks or longer and was confirmed by radiologic, endoscopic, or surgical evaluation. The diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC) was based on typical clinical presentation of 4 weeks or more and endoscopic, radiologic, or surgical evaluation. Mean age of the participants at baseline was 53 years, mean body mass index (BMI) was 25.4 kg/m2, mean physical activity was 13.2 metabolic hours per week, 94.5% were white and 36.6% never smoked.

A documented 122 cases of CD and 123 cases of UC were recorded during 1,492,811 person–years of follow–up. The median predicted 25(OH) D level was 27.6 ng/mL. Women in the lowest quartile of predicted 25(OH)D level compared with those in the highest quartile had a higher body mass index, were less active, tended to reside in the Northern or Midwestern regions of the United States, and had lower intake levels of dietary or supplemental vitamin D. The median age of diagnosis of CD was 64.0 years; for UC, it was 63.5 years. The median interval between assessment of plasma 25(OH) D levels and disease diagnosis was 12 years for UC and 10 years for CD.

For every 1 ng/mL increase in predicted 25(OH) D level, the risk for CD was reduced by 6%. For UC, there was also a reduction in risk, but it was non–significant at 4%. Women in the highest two quartiles of 25(OH)D levels had multivariate HRs of 0.50 and 0.55, respectively, for CD. Each 100 IU/day increase in total intake resulted in a 10% reduction in UC risk and a 7% reduction in CD risk. For vitamin D intake from diet and supplements based on quartile distribution, there was a significant linear inverse trend for vitamin D intake and UC risk, but this trend was weaker for CD. Intakes of 800 IU/day or higher led to greater reductions in the risks for UC and CD. Vitamin D intake was inversely associated with the risks for CD and UC, vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency was an important mediator in the pathogenesis of UC and CD, and assessment of vitamin D status should be a part of the assessment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

Vitamin D intake associated with reduced risk for Crohn’s disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Vitamin D intake associated with reduced risk for Crohn’s disease

Increased intake of vitamin D may significantly reduce the risk for Crohn’s disease (CD) in women, according to a study published in the journal Gastroenterology.

  • This study involved 72,719 women who returned the 1986 questionnaire. They had data on both vitamin D intake and physical activity and did not have a history of CD or ulcerative colitis (UC).
  • Diagnosis of CD was based on a typical history of 4 weeks or longer and was confirmed by radiologic, endoscopic, or surgical evaluation.
  • The diagnosis of UC was based on typical clinical presentation of 4 weeks or more and endoscopic, radiologic, or surgical evaluation.
  • Mean age of the participants at baseline was 53 years, mean body mass index (BMI) was 25.4 kg/m2, mean physical activity was 13.2 metabolic hours per week, 94.5% were white and 36.6% never smoked.
  • A documented 122 cases of CD and 123 cases of UC were recorded during 1,492,811 person–years of follow–up. The median predicted 25(OH)D level was 27.6 ng/mL.
  • Women in the lowest quartile of predicted 25(OH)D level compared with those in the highest quartile had a higher body mass index, were less active, tended to reside in the Northern or Midwestern regions of the United States, and had lower intake levels of dietary or supplemental vitamin D. The median age of diagnosis of CD was 64.0 years; for UC, it was 63.5 years.
  • The median interval between assessment of plasma 25(OH) D levels and disease diagnosis was 12 years for UC and 10 years for CD.
  • For every 1 ng/mL increase in predicted 25(OH)D level, the risk for CD was reduced by 6%.
  • For UC, there was also a reduction in risk, but it was non-significant at 4%.
  • Women in the highest two quartiles of 25(OH)D levels had multivariate HRs of 0.50 and 0.55, respectively, for CD.
  • Each 100 IU/day increase in total intake resulted in a 10% reduction in UC risk and a 7% reduction in CD risk.
  • For vitamin D intake from diet and supplements based on quartile distribution, there was a significant linear inverse trend for vitamin D intake and UC risk, but this trend was weaker for CD.
  • Intakes of 800 IU/day or higher resulted in greater reductions in the risks for UC and CD.
  • Vitamin D intake was inversely associated with the risks for CD and UC, vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency was an important mediator in the pathogenesis of UC and CD, and assessment of vitamin D status should be a part of the assessment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

Vitamin D intake associated with reduced risk for Crohn’s disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Vitamin D intake associated with reduced risk for Crohn’s disease

Increased intake of vitamin D may significantly reduce the risk for Crohn’s disease (CD) in women, according to an article published online December 12 and in the March issue of the journal Gastroenterology.

  • This study involved 72,719 women who returned the 1986 questionnaire. They had data on both vitamin D intake and physical activity and did not have a history of CD or ulcerative colitis (UC).
  • Diagnosis of CD was based on a typical history of 4 weeks or longer and was confirmed by radiologic, endoscopic, or surgical evaluation.
  • The diagnosis of UC was based on typical clinical presentation of 4 weeks or more and endoscopic, radiologic, or surgical evaluation.
  • Mean age of the participants at baseline was 53 years, mean body mass index (BMI) was 25.4 kg/m2, mean physical activity was 13.2 metabolic hours per week, 94.5% were white and 36.6% never smoked.
  • A documented 122 cases of CD and 123 cases of UC were recorded during 1,492,811 person–years of follow–up. The median predicted 25(OH)D level was 27.6 ng/mL.
  • Women in the lowest quartile of predicted 25(OH)D level compared with those in the highest quartile had a higher body mass index, were less active, tended to reside in the Northern or Midwestern regions of the United States, and had lower intake levels of dietary or supplemental vitamin D. The median age of diagnosis of CD was 64.0 years; for UC, it was 63.5 years.
  • The median interval between assessment of plasma 25(OH) D levels and disease diagnosis was 12 years for UC and 10 years for CD.
  • For every 1 ng/mL increase in predicted 25(OH)D level, the risk for CD was reduced by 6%.
  • For UC, there was also a reduction in risk, but it was non-significant at 4%.
  • Women in the highest two quartiles of 25(OH)D levels had multivariate HRs of 0.50 and 0.55, respectively, for CD.
  • Each 100 IU/day increase in total intake resulted in a 10% reduction in UC risk and a 7% reduction in CD risk.
  • For vitamin D intake from diet and supplements based on quartile distribution, there was a significant linear inverse trend for vitamin D intake and UC risk, but this trend was weaker for CD.
  • Intakes of 800 IU/day or higher resulted in greater reductions in the risks for UC and CD.
  • Vitamin D intake was inversely associated with the risks for CD and UC, vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency was an important mediator in the pathogenesis of UC and CD, and assessment of vitamin D status should be a part of the assessment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

Vitamin D intake associated with reduced risk for Crohn’s disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Vitamin D intake associated with reduced risk for Crohn’s disease

Increased intake of vitamin D may significantly reduce the risk for Crohn’s disease (CD) in women, according to an article published online December 12 and in the March issue of the journal Gastroenterology.

  • This study involved 72,719 women who returned the 1986 questionnaire. They had data on both vitamin D intake and physical activity and did not have a history of CD or ulcerative colitis (UC).
  • Diagnosis of CD was based on a typical history of 4 weeks or longer and was confirmed by radiologic, endoscopic, or surgical evaluation.
  • The diagnosis of UC was based on typical clinical presentation of 4 weeks or more and endoscopic, radiologic, or surgical evaluation.
  • Mean age of the participants at baseline was 53 years, mean body mass index (BMI) was 25.4 kg/m2, mean physical activity was 13.2 metabolic hours per week, 94.5% were white and 36.6% never smoked.
  • A documented 122 cases of CD and 123 cases of UC were recorded during 1,492,811 person–years of follow–up. The median predicted 25(OH)D level was 27.6 ng/mL.
  • Women in the lowest quartile of predicted 25(OH)D level compared with those in the highest quartile had a higher body mass index, were less active, tended to reside in the Northern or Midwestern regions of the United States, and had lower intake levels of dietary or supplemental vitamin D. The median age of diagnosis of CD was 64.0 years; for UC, it was 63.5 years.
  • The median interval between assessment of plasma 25(OH) D levels and disease diagnosis was 12 years for UC and 10 years for CD.
  • For every 1 ng/mL increase in predicted 25(OH)D level, the risk for CD was reduced by 6%.
  • For UC, there was also a reduction in risk, but it was non–significant at 4%.
  • Women in the highest two quartiles of 25(OH)D levels had multivariate HRs of 0.50 and 0.55, respectively, for CD.
  • Each 100 IU/day increase in total intake resulted in a 10% reduction in UC risk and a 7% reduction in CD risk.
  • For vitamin D intake from diet and supplements based on quartile distribution, there was a significant linear inverse trend for vitamin D intake and UC risk, but this trend was weaker for CD.
  • Intakes of 800 IU/day or higher resulted in greater reductions in the risks for UC and CD.
  • Vitamin D intake was inversely associated with the risks for CD and UC, vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency was an important mediator in the pathogenesis of UC and CD, and assessment of vitamin D status should be a part of the assessment of inflammatory bowel diseases.