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Dr K K Aggarwal

According to Buddhism, the three negative emotions that cause disease are ignorance, hatred and desire. Accordingly physical sickness are classified into three main types.

• Disorders of desire (Ayurvedic equivalent of Vata imbalance): These are due to disharmony of the wind or energy. The seed of these disorders are located in the lower part of the body. It has cold preferences and is affected by mental desires. In this, the person mainly suffers from the disorders of movement functions.

• Disorders of hatred (Ayurveda equivalent of Pitta imbalance): It is due to disharmony of the bile. The seed of these disorders is centered in the middle and upper part of the body and is caused by the mental emotion of hate. The person suffers from metabolic and digestive abnormalities.

• Disorders of ignorance (Ayurveda equivalent of Kapha imbalance): It is due to the disharmony of phlegm, the seed of which is generally centered in the chest or in the head and the disorder is cold in nature. It is caused by the mental emotion of ignorance.

Desire, hatred and ignorance are the main negativities mentioned in Buddha’s philosophy. They are all produced in the mind, and once produced they behave like a slow poison. The Udanavarga once said, “From iron appears rust, and rust eats the iron”, “Likewise, the careless actions (karma) that we perform lead us to hellish lives.

According to the other scriptures, six afflictions are most troublesome, namely ignorance, hatred, desire, miserliness, jealousy and arrogance. Patience is the most potent virtue a person can acquire. According to the Shanti Deva, “There is no evil like hatred, and there is no fortitude like patience. Therefore, dedicate your life to the practice of patience.”

Bhagvad Gita classifies the enemies as Kama, Krodha, Lobha, Moha and Ahankara; of these, Kama, Lobha and Ahankara, are the three gateways to hell.

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All those out there who feel you are at your wits’ end wondering how things don’t ever work out for you, can now relax and dwell on all those failures that life has taken you through and turn failure into success.

• Failure doesn’t mean you are a failure. But it does mean you haven’t succeeded yet.

• Failure doesn’t mean you have accomplished nothing. It does mean you have learned something.

• Failure doesn’t mean you have been a foolish. It does mean you had a lot of faith.

• Failure doesn’t mean you’ve been discouraged. It does mean you were willing to try.

• Failure doesn’t mean you don’t know what to do. It does mean you have to do it in a different way.

• Failure doesn’t mean you are inferior. It does mean you are not perfect.

• Failure doesn’t mean you have wasted your life. It does mean you have a reason to start afresh.

• Failure doesn’t mean you should give up. It does mean you must try harder.

• Failure doesn’t mean you’ll never make it. It does mean it will take a little longer.

• Failure doesn’t mean God has abandoned you. It does mean God has a better idea.

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1. There are two types of people who believe in Dvaita or Advaita philosophy.

2. People who believe in Dvaita philosophy, for them God and human being are different.

3. The people who believe in Advaita philosophy believe that God is within them.

4. In Hinduism, the first group believes in Sanatan Dharma and does Moorti pooja (idol worship) and the second Arya Samaj, which does not believe in Moorti pooja.

5. In both situations, medically the message is one.

6. If God is different than you, then you try to be like Him and if God is in within you, then you are Him.

7. In both situations, we should deal with our body the same way as we deal with God.

8. Anything which is not offered to God should not be offered to our body such as cigarettes, drugs etc or such things should be consumed in less quantity (onion, garlic, radish etc.).

9. We never worship God with hydrogenated oil; we always worship him either with oil or with Desi Ghee. The message is we should not consume trans fats.

10. “Bhagwan ko bhog lagate hain”; we never feed God. The message is eat less.

11. Amongst all Gods, only Lord Shiva is said to consume Bhang and Alcohol that too only in his incarnation of Bhairon, which indicates that both alcohol and bhang can be consumed in some quantity only in special situations meaning that they cannot be consumed without medical supervision.

12. Anything grown under the ground is not offered to God, thus, these items should not be eaten or eaten in moderation.

13. We never offer white salt and white rice to God. They are also bad for human beings.

14. Gur, shakkar, brown rice and puffed rice are offered to God. They can be consumed by human beings.

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Why do people suffer?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As per Garud Puran and Hindu mythology, one of the reasons for suffering is the debts of your past birth. Your purpose of life is to face sufferings to pay these debts. The second reason is your present deeds till today starting from birth. If your sum total of bad deeds is more than good deeds, they get added to your previous birth’s debts.

The third reason for suffering is the form of struggle, which you entertain to attain future success. Some people do not call it as suffering.

The last reason for suffering is that some people acquire yogic powers to take on the sufferings of others. The classical examples are Shirdi Sai Baba and Jesus Christ who were known to cure others by adding their suffering to their own account. Most Gods or holy people had suffered in their last time, be it Jesus Christ, Krishna, Buddha or Sai Baba. Only Rishi Munis can remain alive and die at will even after they have paid for all their debts.


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In every traditional gurukul, no studies start without chanting the following

Saraswati namasthubhyam

Varade kaama roopini

Vidyaarambham karishyaami

Sidhirbhavatu me sadaa

“O Goddess Saraswati, the giver of Boons and fulfiller of wishes, I prostrate to You before starting my studies. May you always fulfill me.”

Indian Vedas consider knowledge about self as the supreme knowledge and all tools for the same are considered sacred and divine and must be given respect. The traditional custom is not to step on any sacred educational tool.

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Signs of Spiritual Awakening

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• More experiences of telepathy

• More experiences of reverse telepathy • More spontaneous fulfillment of desires

• Increased tendency to let things happen rather than make them happen. Work done with the least effort.

• Change in the nature, more smiling, laughter and thankful nature.

• Feelings of being connected with others and nature. • Frequent overwhelming episodes of appreciation.

• Tendency to think and act spontaneously rather than from fears based on past experience.

• Ability to enjoy each moment.

• Living in the present.

• Loss of worry.

• A loss of interest in conflict.

• A loss of interest in interpreting the actions of others.

• A loss of interest in judging others.

• A loss of interest in judging self.

• Gaining the ability to love without expecting anything in return.

• Quality of converting an adversity into opportunity.

• Dislike for drugs, smoke and excess of alcohol.

• Happiness in doing random acts of kindness.

• Looking for good in every one.

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Definition of Health

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Health is not mere absence of disease; it is a state of physical, mental, social, spiritual, environmental and financial well-being. Allopathy does not define all aspects of health.

During MBBS, medical students are taught more about the physical health. Social and mental health are covered only in few lectures. Community health is a separate subject but never given its due importance. Spiritual health is not defined at all and financial health is hardly covered.

Yet, in day-to-day practice it is the social, financial, spiritual and community health, which is the most important during patient-doctor communication. It is incorporated in the four basic purposes: dharma, artha, kama and moksha.

Dharma and artha together form the basis of karma which is righteous earning. You are what your deep rooted desires are. Most of the diseases today can be traced to a particular emotion, positive or negative. Anger and jealously are related with heart attack, fear with blood pressure, greed & possessiveness with heart failure. Unless the mind is healthy, one cannot be free of diseases.

The best description of health comes from Ayurveda. In Sanskrit health means swasthya, which means establishment in the self. One is established in the self when there is a union of mind, body and soul. Most symbols of health are established around a shaft with two snakes and two wings. The shaft represents the body, two snakes represent the duality of mind and the two wings represent the freedom of soul.

Sushrut Samhita in Chapter 15 shloka 10 defines the ayurvedic person as under:

Samadosha, samagnischa,

Samadhatumalkriyah,

Prasannatmendriyamanah,

Swastha iti abhidhiyate.

From the Ayurvedic point of view, for a person to be healthy, he must have balanced doshas, balanced agni, balanced dhatus, normal functioning of malkriyas and mind, body, spirit and indriyas full of bliss and happiness.
Human body is made up of structures (Kapha) that perform two basic functions: firstly, metabolism (pitta) and movement (vata). Vata, pitta and kapha are called doshas in Ayurveda. Samana dosha means balance of structures, metabolism and movement functions in the body. Agni in Ayurveda is said to be in balance when a person has normal tejas and a good appetite.
Ayurveda describes seven dhatus: rasa, rakta, mamsa, medha, asthi, majja, shukra and they are required to be in balance. They are equivalent to various tissues in the human body.

Ayurveda necessitates proper functioning of natural urges like urination, stool, sweating and breathing and that is what balances in malakriya means.

Ayurveda says for a person to be healthy he has to be mentally and spiritually healthy which will only happen when his or her indriyas are cheerful, full of bliss and devoid of any negativities. For indriyas to be in balance one has to learn to control over the lust cum desires, greed and ego. This can be done by learning regular pranayama, learning the do’s and don’ts in life, living in a disciplined atmosphere and learn to live in the present.
Regular pranayama shifts one from sympathetic to para sympathetic mode, balances the mind and thoughts and helps in removing negative thoughts from the mind. For living a disabled life one can follow the yama and niyama of yoga sutras of Patanjali or dos and don’ts taught by various religious gurus, leaders and principles of naturopathy. Living in the present means conscious or meditative living. This involves either learning meditation 20 minutes twice a day or learning subtle mental exercises like mind–body relaxation, yogic shavasana, self–hypnotic exercises, etc.
According to Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, a person who eats thrice a day is a rogi, twice a day is a bhogi and once a day is yogi. The take home message is: to live more, eat less.
Swar yoga defines the importance of respiration and longevity. According to this yoga shastra, everybody has a fixed number of breaths to be taken during the life span.
Lesser the number a person takes in a minute more is the life. It also forms the basis of pranayama which is nothing but longer and deeper breathing with reduced respiratory rate. To be healthy one can remember to follow the principle of moderation and variety in diet & exercise, regular pranayama & meditation and positive thinking.







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Mindfulness meditation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off

• Sit on a straight–backed chair or cross–legged on the floor.
• Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling as you inhale and exhale.
• Once you’ve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations and ideas.
• Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.
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