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Dr K K Aggarwal

Luv-Kush, Shubha-Labha, Riddhi-Siddhi are inseparable pairs of Vedanta. They signify that you cannot get one without the help of the other.

In Luv-Kush, Kush is a symbol of purity and Luv symbolize the spiritual love. To achieve love one has to be pure in consciousness. To acquire love and inner happiness in life, one may have to use kush, a herb, in daily life. No traditional Hindu ritual is complete without the use of kush grasses.

Kush is a benevolent satvik detoxifying grass, a symbol of progress and alertness. The word “kushal buddhi” originates from the word kush. In Bhagavad Gita (shloka 6.10) Krishna said that for meditation one should sit on a seat covered with kush grass. The Garuda Purana also described the importance of kush grass in rituals of Panchak death and in cremation of a person whose body has not been found as in natural calamities, by making an effigy of kush grass and completing the rituals. Kush grass is often held in the hands before taking a sankalp.

Kush grass is called Imperata cylindrica Beauv. It is a clean, pure, brittle grass with acrid, cooling, oleaginous, aphrodisiac and diuretic properties. Kush sharbat is a drink routinely used by traditional healers of Chattisgarh.

In Riddhi-Siddhi, Riddhi is knowledge and Siddhi is perfection. An obstacle-free life (represented by Ganesha) can be attained only when one masters or tames both knowledge and perfection.

Riddhi and Siddhi are the two inseparable wives of Lord Ganesha.

Some symbolize Siddhi as success and Riddhi as prosperity or Riddhi as material abundance and Siddhi as the intellectual and spiritual prowess or Riddhi as prosperity and Siddhi as progress. All are dependent on each other.

Ganesha is said to have two sons, Shubha-Labha. Again the two terms are inseparable from each other. Both the words are written during Diwali on each account book. Shubha is auspiciousness and Labha, profit.

Ram Lakshman are often spoken of as Ram-Lakhan, which signifies that to be in touch with consciousness (Rama) one has to control the mind with an aim (Mana with a Lakshya). Other pairs, which are inseparable, are Rama and Sita, Radha and Krishna, Shiva and Parvati, Brahma and Saraswati and Vishnu and Lakshmi.

In Rama-Sita, Rama signifies soul consciousness and Sita, the body. It is true for the Krishna and Radha combination. They also signify the dual character of the nature, feminine and masculine natures.

In Brahma and Saraswati, Brahma represents creativity or innovations and Saraswati the art of acquiring pure knowledge. Again both are dependent on each other.

Lakshmi and Vishnu are again inseparable. Vishnu or Krishna is the doer and performer. They signify action in the present. Lakshmi signifies material and spiritual benefits. One can only get the benefits by action in dharma.

Shiva-Parvati is other inseparable word used in Vedic literature. The other is Shiva and Shakti. They represent the true nature of the consciousness, the male and the female energies; the purusha and the prakriti. In terms of computer language, they represent the operational and the application software. No computer can run without both. One is knowledge or the information and the other is energy.

Other uncommon pairs are Bharata and Shatrughana of Ramayana. Bharata represents bhakti, devotion and discipline and Shatrughana, victory over the enemy. To win over the Shatru, one has to become Bharata.

In Mahabharata, there is the pair of Nakul (being neutral) and Sahdeva (helping every one). Again they are inseparable. You cannot help unless you are neutral.

The pairs of modern post Vedic era are Heer-Ranjha, Laila-Majnu, Sheeri-Farhad, Banti and Babli and Veer-Zara. They all symbolize human love relationship.

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The loss of a loved is often painful. The resultant grief makes it hard to eat, sleep and leads to loss of interest in routine life affecting behavior and judgment.

Some can feel agitated or exhausted, to sob unexpectedly, or to withdraw from the world and others may find themselves struggling with feelings of sorrow, numbness, anger, guilt, despair, irritability, relief, or anxiety.

It is well known that disclosing deep emotions through writing can boost immune function as well as mood and well–being. Conversely, the stress of holding in strong feelings can ratchet up blood pressure and heart rate and increase muscle tension.

One can write on a piece of paper, in your personal book, on the open website with nick name or keep it in the mind. One doesn’t have to preserve the emotions and can through away the writings.

In absence of deeply troubling situations, such as suicide or a violent death which are best explored with the help of an experienced therapist, one can choose writing as a way to express out the grief.

• Start writing for 15 to 30 minutes a day for three to four days

• Continue up to a week if it is helping.

• Continue writing for 15 to 30 minutes once a week for a month.

• Writing has stronger effects when it extends over more days.

• Remember writing about grief and loss can trigger strong emotions (one may cry or feel deeply upset).

• Many people find journal writing valuable and meaningful and report feeling better afterward.

• Don’t worry about grammar or sentence structure.

• Truly let go. Write down how you feel and why you feel that way. You’re writing for yourself, not others.

(Source Harvard Newsletter)

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You should be not only positive, different but also persistent. In ten incarnations of Lord Vishnu, the first is a fish, which indicates to be different in life. The second incarnation is the tortoise, which indicates that you should be different but learn to withdraw when the need arises. The third is a boar which indicates persistence.

The mantra of a successful life is to be positively different and persistent and yet learn to withdraw when the situation arises.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

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Stress is the reaction of the body or the mind to the interpretation of a known situation. Stress management, therefore, involves either changing the situation, changing the interpretation or taming the body the yogic way in such a way that stress does not affect the body.

Every situation has two sides. Change of interpretation means looking at the other side of the situation. It is something like half glass of water, which can be interpreted as half empty or half full.

Studies have shown that anger, hostility and aggression are the new risk factors for heart disease. It has been shown that even recall of anger can precipitate a heart attack.

Many studies have shown that in front of unconscious patients in ICU when doctors talk positive their outcome is better than those in whose presence if doctors talk negative.

The best way to practice spiritual medicine is to experience silence in the thoughts, speech and action. Simply walking in the nature with silence in the mind and experiencing the sounds of nature can be as effective as 20 minutes of meditation. He said that 20 minutes of meditation provides the same physiological parameters as that of seven hours of deep sleep.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.


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According to Hinduism, the very fact we are born means that in our last life, we did not get liberation or Moksha. It also means that some sufferings in our last birth still remained. Therefore, the purpose of this birth is to face those sufferings.

When the purpose of our life is to face sufferings, why suffer from them?

This should be considered as ‘sukh’ and not ‘dukh’. As per Vedic literature, every diversity is an opportunity to learn or to do something different. The four notable principles of Buddhism also talk about the same. The first is that suffering exists, second that there is a reason for every suffering and third that it is possible to neutralize the suffering by understanding the 8 paths of cessation of suffering.

Also remember that in every ‘dukh’ you think of ‘sukh’ and in every ‘sukh’ you think of a ‘dukh’. Next time you have a problem, think differently and learn to enjoy them.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

 

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Namkaran Sanskar

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off

In India, a person is identified by his/her name, which usually is a reflection of his/her own family. It may contain not only your maiden name but also the name of your father and your surname/caste.

When you are born, you are usually given your special name, which you carry throughout your life unless it is changed for a specific purpose. For example, the surname may change after marriage or the in-laws may change the name, specifically, for a girl.

Artists often change their names to those which may reflect their profession. A classic example is Rajesh Khanna, who changed his name from Jatin to Rajesh, which was easier for the public to recall.

A name for a baby is chosen on any of the following grounds:

• The priest as per the horoscope decides the sound present in the universe and that Akshar (Alphabet) is given to the family to pick up a name starting with that Akshar.

• Sometimes, the name of the baby may be chosen depending upon the auspiciousness of the day he/she was born, e.g. a baby boy born on Krishna Janmashtami, may be named ‘Krishna’ by the family after Lord Krishna.

• If the parents have vowed a Mannat to a deity, then they may name their child after one of the many names of that deity. For example, if parents have taken a Mannat from Vaishno Devi, their baby girl may be named for one of the forms of Goddess Durga or Parvati.

• People may also choose similar names for their children, e.g. Ramesh, Mahesh, and Suresh.

• People may also keep the name of the child in the form of known pairs. If the name of the first child is Luv, the parents may like to name the second child as Kush, especially when the parents have twins. Other examples are Karan Arjun, Sita and Gita etc.

• Sometimes, parents name their child after their favorite celebrity. For example, if someone is a big fan of Sachin Tendulkar, he may name his child Sachin. Sachin himself was named after the noted Hindi film music director Sachin Dev Burman by his father, who was a great fan of SD Burman. Name has a lot of significance as Akshar in Sanskrit has a vibration and if that positive vibration matches with the vibrations of universe at the time of your birth, it helps in healing.

Normally, it is expected that you live up to your name. For example, if your name is Durga, you are expected to know all about Ma Durga and try to adopt characteristics of Durga.

Therefore, everyone is expected to know the literal meaning of his or her name and try to follow a lifestyle that is consistent with your name. For example, if you are named Ram, you are not expected to act like Ravana.

Namkaran Sanskar or the naming ceremony is a complete ceremony and is one of the 16 sanskars. It is both a social and legal necessity. As the naming process creates a bond between the child and the rest of the community, it is considered auspicious.

Some people name their child before he/she is born but a Namkaran Sanskar is usually performed on the 12th day after birth but it may vary from religion to religion and custom to custom. The formal ritual involves a Namkaran puja, which is held at their home or a temple where the priest offers prayers to all the Gods, Navagrihas, five elements, Agni and the ancestors. The horoscope of a child is made and is placed in front of the idol of the deity for blessings. With the baby in the lap of the father, the chosen name of the child is whispered in the right ear.

Some people name the child on the 101st day of the birth; while some choose the first birthday to name their child.

The name of the child also entails certain etiquettes as it reflects a person. You cannot take the name of a person with disrespect. If you abuse a name it means you have abused a person.

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• Know your strengths

• According to a British study, only about one–third of people have a useful understanding of their strengths.

• If something comes easily, you may take it for granted and not identify it as a strength.

• If you are not sure, ask someone you respect and who knows you well, by noticing what people compliment you on, and by thinking about what comes most easily to you.

• Strengths which are most closely linked to happiness are gratitude, hope, vitality, curiosity, and love.

• Strengths are so important that they’re worth cultivating and applying in your daily life, even if they don’t come naturally to you.

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Most Gods and spiritual gurus had suffered in their last days. Lord Krishna had a nonhealing wound, Jesus Christ was crucified, Bhagwan Rajneesh had an infectious disease, Swami Chinmayanand had low functioning heart, Maharshi Mahesh Yogi had heart and pancreatic disease, Satya Sai Baba was put on a ventilator etc.

When they were God–like personalities, why did they suffer in their last days?

The answer to this comes from Vedic knowledge within the concept of rebirth. Vedanta says that the very fact that we are born means that in the last birth we did not attain moksha or liberation. In other words, this means that there were some sufferings yet to be faced. You are born to face those sufferings. When you face the last suffering, there are high chances that that suffering may be your last suffering before liberation.

Most Gods or saints who died in a phase of suffering may mean that they did not attain liberation. A person who dies suddenly or unnaturally would mean that he would have to take rebirth to face more sufferings.

According to me, terminal sufferings are good from spiritual point of view.

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