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Dr K K Aggarwal

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Who is a Good Teacher?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off

A good teacher is the one who follows the principles of listening first, teaching in detail till confusion arises and then teaching with reasoning while going into the minutest details and finally summarizing the ‘take–home’ messages. This is what Lord Krishna taught to Arjuna in Bhagavad Gita. In the first chapter, he only listens, in the second, he gives detailed counseling, from 2 to 17 chapters, he gives reasoning and in 18th chapter, he revises. (Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views)

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The Mantra to acquire spiritual health is to think positive and differently. Positive thinking produces positive hormones and takes you from sympathetic mode to parasympathetic mode. When you think different, it gives you several opportunities and then from the multiple options available, you can ask your heart to choose one of them. Thinking positive was a message given by Lord Buddha and thinking different by Adi Shankaracharya. The candle light march, which was held to fight for justice in the Jessica Lal murder case, has been picked up by most protest campaigns because it was positive and different. I have seen three examples in my life where I used this mantra and prolonged the life of those persons. My grandfather–in–law at the age of 85 thought it was time to go but when we made him work positively and differently, he died at the age of 100 years. He was asked to teach youngsters law, write to the Prime Minister everyday on certain issues and find matrimonial matches for the youngest persons in the family. In other two cases, one was suffering from terminal prostate cancer and the other had terminal brain cancer. The first one lived for 10 years and the other is still alive. Both were told that they had a very early cancer and that was cured by a surgery. When you think different, it creates creativity and when it is with positive attitude, it is accepted by all (Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views)

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Aastik Vs Nastik

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off

Traditionally, people believe that Nastik are people who do not go to temples or related places of worship. They also do not believe in God. To differentiate between Astik and Nastik, we need to first understand the concept of Sanatan Dharma and Arya Samaj Dharma. People who believe in Sanatan Dharma consider God as separate from the self and worship him in the form of an idol. They believe in Dualism theory. Arya Samaj followers do not do idol worship and believe in non–dualism and treat God and self as one. Arya Samajis, therefore, will not go to a temple where the idols of Gods are placed. Being an Arya Samaji does not mean that the person is Nastik. The word Nastik means someone who does not believe in God at all, therefore, he or she also does not believe in self as God is nothing but self. In medical sciences, these are the people who have no insight and will usually be suffering from depression and loss of self–esteem. The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views.

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Traditionally, we recognize Raksha Bandhan as a bond of love between a brother and a sister. Rakhi is synonymous with purity of the relationship. The tying of the rakhi also denotes the brother’s vow to protect his sister. The Raksha Bandhan festival represents the spirit of fraternity. It is a traditional way to celebrate the unconditional love between siblings. The word ‘Raksha’ means protection and ‘Bandhan’ signifies bondage. Rakhi is a sacred that sister ties on her brother’s wrist to protect him from all types of negativity in life. The brother also vows to protect his loving sister by offering her a suitable gift. This festival that glorifies precious emotions of love, care and affection Give your sister the precious gift of good health on this Raksha Bandhan. Gift her a health checkup package. Share love not sweets. Sweets are rich in trans-fats and refined carbohydrates. Trans-fats increase LDL or the bad cholesterol and lower HDL or the healthy cholesterol and increase the risk for diseases like heart attack. Sweets that are made of hydrogenated fats are rich in trans-fats. Also, do not gift chocolates as they are rich in refined sugar and saturated fats. They can be harmful to the health. Chocolates can increase the chances of fatty liver, abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome. Give dry fruits, jaggery chana, sattu, fruits instead of sweets, chocolates and cookies. All women needs iron an proteins. Jaggery is high in iron and chana (black gram) in proteins. Sattu is the natural healthy fast food and good for the health. Fresh fruits are health friendly. One should eat atleast 3-5 servings of fruits every day, Dry fruits are protective as they have high contents of natural vitamin E. The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views.

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Rakhi is generally recognized as a celebration of a bond of love between brother and a sister. But how many of us have actually thought about what this tie entails? Rakhi is synonymous with purity of the relationship and purity of the self and consequently of the soul. It is not merely a thread tied on the brother’s wrist by the sister whereby the brother pledges to protect her from any worldly harm. In a broader spectrum, it is a chance to free oneself from one’s internal enemies – the vices, especially the lust including the sexual one. A man is pulled down by his negative energies and Rakhi gives him a chance to retrospect and pull out of that dark side. Eight days after Rakhi we celebrate Janmashtami. The sacred thread tied during Raksha Bandhan connects us to Janmashtami, when we celebrate the birth of Lord Krishna. In this period of eight days between ‘Purnima’ and ‘Ashtami’ we get a chance of cleansing and purifying our soul and subsequently getting reborn again. This seven-day period, symbolic of the time taken for creation of the world by God can be likened to a recreation of the self by us. This period is to be seen as a time for penance when all negativism is purged to achieve the level of pure spirit. Needless to say, all forms of ‘spiritual downers’ should be abstained from, so that a hindrance free communion with the soul is made possible. In fact an ideal gift to one’s sister can be the shedding of a strong vices in that person. The message of Rakshabandhan is that of love and purity. We can see it as a thread tied on behalf of God to set us on Godly ways. The initial representation of Rakhi as a pledge to protect the sister and her right to be protected by the brother has gained wide propagation due to the fact that in Indian history and mythology there have been instances when this facet of tying a thread on a man’s wrist has been highlighted. Rani Padmavati sent a Rakhi to a Muslim king to ask for help when she was besieged by enemies. In the realm of the Gods, we have Indrani tying a Rakhi on Lord Indra. There is also the tradition of tying Rakhi by a Brahmin to a Yajman. The connection between Rakshabandhan and Janmashtami is highlighted keeping in view the spiritual aspect of man’s life, which is the ladder that helps him to achieve oneness with God. Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views.

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Raksha Bandhan is observed as a bond of protection and celebrates the relationship of brothers and sisters. It is also called Rakhi Purnima. It is said that in the historical time the Rajputs Queens used to send Rakhi threads to the neighboring rulers as a token on brotherhood. The festival grew in popularity after Rani Karnavati, the widow queen of Chittor sent a Rakhi to the Mugal Emperor Humayun when she required his help. It is difficult to digest that Raksha Bandhan started in Mughal Era. It had its presence in the Vedic times which is cleared from the fact that it is not observed on any fixed day but exactly 8 days before the Janmashtami. If it would have been based on the Mugal Era, it would have been observed exactly the same day when Rakhi thread was sent to Humayun. The real fact is that the day and date of Raksha Bandhan changes every year, which means it has same Vedic logic. Lust in today’s language is considered as one of the main cause of any disease and it can be for food, cigarette, alcohol, drugs or sex. In Vedic Era, lust was synonymous with sex lust as cigarette was not there, alcohol was not a drink of kings, refined carbohydrates were not prevalent and drugs were also not prevalent. In Chaturmas which happens in Dakshinayan when the days are shorter than the nights, in Vedic literature, it has been mentioned that Chaturmas is a period when the desires are not fulfilled and there is turmoil of negativity in the mind. That is the reason that most of the mind control exercise, rituals and festivals are observed in the month of Chaturmas. Controlling of sexual lust is one such phase in Chaturmas which needs to be controlled. Raksha Bandhan, Jagannath Yatra and Bhai Dooj, all the three festivals which relate to the sacred relationship of brothers and sisters are observed in these four months only. The protection of a female probably is meant not physical protection but from sexual assault protection. Observance of Raksha Bandhan on Purnima again indicates that compared to Amavasya in Purnima, there is significantly more mental turmoil which needs to be controlled. The time of Rakhi in the hands, just above the wrist, taking acupressure points into considerations coincides with the control of sexual area. Observance of Janmashtami after 8 days of Raksha Bandhan again indicates that control of lust may take upto 8 days, once your mind is purified from the lust, you get in touch with your consciousness and which was the birth of Krishna, indicates the Union with the Consciousness.

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Bhagavad Gita 2.10 “Tam uvāca hṛṣīkeśaḥ prahasann iva bhārata senayor ubhayor madhye viṣīdantam idaṁ vacaḥ” Tam—unto him; uvāca—said; hṛṣīkeśaḥ—the master of the senses, Kṛṣṇa; prahasan—smiling; iva—like that; bhārata—O Dhṛtarāṣṭra, descendant of Bharata; senayoḥ—of the armies; ubhayoḥ—of both parties; madhye—between; viṣīdantam—unto the lamenting one; idam—the following; vacaḥ—words. Translation: “O descendant of Bharata, at that time Kṛṣṇa, smiling, in the midst of both the armies, spoke the following words to the grief-stricken Arjuna.” The answer comes in Bhagavad Gita, the first text book of counseling. When grief ridden Arjuna approaches Krishna, he starts his counseling in a happy and smiling mood. Arjuna was grief-filled, sad and rebellious. Yet Krishna smiled. The word in the Gita is prahasann, which means to smile before laughing (beginning to laugh). It was not a weak or full smile or a sarcastic grimace, but a very positive smile. Half of grief/apprehension is alleviated if a patient sees his doctor smiling or the relatives see a smile on the face of a doctor coming out of Operation Theater. It also gives confidence to the patient (Arjuna) that his doctor (Krishna) has understood his problem fully and has a solution to his problem. Buddha is also shown smiling and Goddess Kushmanda is also shown with a smiling face.

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