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Dr K K Aggarwal

There are 4 main types of vegetarian diets:

  1. Lacto–ovo–vegetarian consumes dairy products and eggs but no meat, poultry, or seafood

  2. Lacto–vegetarian eats dairy products but not eggs, meat, poultry, or seafood

  3. Ovo–vegetarian eats eggs but no dairy products, meat, poultry, or seafood

  4. Vegan does not eat any animal products, including meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy products; many vegans will also avoid honey.

Vegetarian and plant–based diets are associated with a reduced risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer as well as increased longevity. Vegetarian diets are typically lower in fat, particularly saturated fat, and higher in dietary fiber. They are also likely to include more whole grains, legumes, nuts, and soy protein, and together with the absence of red meat, this type of eating plan may provide many benefits for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic health problems, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

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Different fevers can be differentiated clinically. Following are few tips:

  1. If a patient comes with fever with chills and rigors, think of Malaria in north and filaria in Vidarbha region in India.
  2. In malaria, chills occur in the afternoon; in filaria, the chills occur in the evening.
  3. Fever with joint pains on extension is often due to Chikungunya (flexion improves the pain)
  4. Think of dengue if there is fever with itching, rash and periorbital pain.
  5. In presence of fever with single chills think of pneumonia.
  6. Fever with sore throat, no cough, no nasal discharge: Think of streptococcal sore throat, especially in the children.
  7. Fever with red angry–looking throat: Think of streptococcal sore throat
  8. Fever with red epiglottis: Think of Hemophilus infection
  9. Fever with cough and or nasal discharge: Think of common flu
  10. Fever with cough, nasal discharge, nausea and vomiting: Think of H1N1 flu
  11. Fever with toxic look, persistent fever: Look for typhoid
  12. Fever with no or low rise in pulse: Look for typhoid
  13. Fever with urinary symptoms (burning, frequency): Rule out urinary infection.
  14. Fever with high TLC (white cell count) and liver pain: Rule out liver abscess
  15. Fever with watery diarrhea, with no blood or mucous: Rule out acute gastroenteritis
  16. After the fever is over, jaundice appears: This is viral hepatitis
  17. After the fever subsides, one feels very weak: Rule our dengue hemorrhagic fever.
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  1. Pace yourself: Keep going, but don’t risk overtaxing yourself. Instead of burning through all your battery life in two hours, spread it out between morning tasks, afternoon tasks, and evening activities, with rest and meals between.
  2. Take a walk or a nap: However, if you have trouble sleeping at night, napping can make the insomnia worse. If that’s the case for you, get moving instead. Get up and walk around the block, or just get up and move around. If you are not an insomniac, enjoy that 20– to 30–minute power nap.
  3. Skip most supplements: There is no evidence that they works
    • DHEA: There is no evidence that dehydroepiandrosterone or DHEA offers any real benefits.
    • Iron. Iron only improves energy if you are clearly deficient.
    • B vitamins. It is true that B vitamins (B1, B2, B6 and B12) help the body convert food into the form of energy that cells can burn, but taking more B vitamins does not supercharge your cells.

4. Fuel up wisely: A sugary bakery roll delivers plenty of calories, but your body tends to metabolize them faster, and then you can end up with sinking blood sugar and fatigue. You’ll maintain a steadier energy level by eating lean protein and unrefined carbohydrates. Try low–fat yogurt with a sprinkling of nuts, raisins, and honey

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Diabetes is associated with a 25–75% increase in the relative risk of hospitalization due to pneumonia. Hence, patients with diabetes, especially those who have had diabetes for a longer duration should be given flu and pneumococcal vaccine. It is equally important to control diabetes adequately to prevent pneumonia-related hospitalization among diabetic patients.

In the study Dr. Jette B. Kornum from Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg and colleagues identified 34,239 individuals with a pneumonia–related hospital admission and 342,390 individuals from the general population who served as a control group. The study showed that individuals with diabetes had a 26% higher risk of pneumonia–related hospitalization compared with those without diabetes. The risk of pneumonia–related hospitalization was increased by 4.4–fold in subjects with type 1 diabetes and by 1.2–fold in those with type 2 diabetes.

The maximum risk was related to longer duration of diabetes (more than 9 years) with poor glycemic control (A1c > 9%). The risk was 37% higher in diabetics of over 9 years duration and 60% higher when the A1c was over 9% as compared to 22% higher risk when the A1c was lower than 7%.

A1c is the measure of average blood sugar of the last three months and should be kept lower than 7%.

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Some facts about the polio vaccine

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Polio vaccine should be given immediately after the neonate is born.
  2. Some people feel that one dosage of the polio vaccine is enough to prevent the attack from the virus, which is not true.
  3. Children should get full doses regimen of the oral polio drops.
  4. It is a virus that resides in the throat or the intestinal tract.
  5. A common myth associated with polio vaccine is that it causes impotency which is a ridiculous claim. The polio vaccine is the safest vaccine available in India
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Clinical tips to differentiate between different types of fever

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off

  1. If a patient comes with fever with chills and rigors, think of Malaria in north and filaria in Vidarbha region in India.
  2. In malaria, chills occur in the afternoon; in filaria, the chills occur in the evening.
  3. Fever with joint pains on extension is often due to Chikungunya (flexion improves the pain)
  4. Think of dengue if there is fever with itching, rash and periorbital pain.
  5. In presence of fever with single chills think of pneumonia.
  6. Fever with sore throat, no cough, no nasal discharge: Think of streptococcal sore throat, especially in the children.
  7. Fever with red angry–looking throat: Think of streptococcal sore throat
  8. Fever with red epiglottis: Think of Hemophilus infection
  9. Fever with cough and or nasal discharge: Think of common flu
  10. Fever with cough, nasal discharge, nausea and vomiting: Think of H1N1 flu
  11. Fever with toxic look, persistent fever: Look for typhoid
  12. Fever with no or low rise in pulse: Look for typhoid
  13. Fever with urinary symptoms (burning, frequency): Rule out urinary infection.
  14. Fever with high TLC (white cell count) and liver pain: Rule out liver abscess
  15. Fever with watery diarrhea, with no blood or mucous: Rule out acute gastroenteritis
  16. After the fever is over, jaundice appears: This is viral hepatitis
  17. After the fever is over, one feels very weak: Rule our dengue hemorrhagic fever.
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A mix of exercise protocol is better

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A combination of weight training and aerobic exercise is the best prescription for overweight patients at risk for diabetes and heart disease.

Only aerobic exercise is also good as it reduces weight and inches off the waistlines. Jut weight lifting alone has very little benefit.

According to a study published in the American Journal of Cardiology, people in the weight-training group gained about 1.5 pounds and those in the aerobic group lost an average of 3 pounds and half an inch from their waists. Those who did both weight and aerobic training dropped about 4 pounds and 1 waistline inch.  This group also had lower diastolic lower blood pressure as well as a decline in metabolic syndrome score. Both the aerobic-only group and the combined-exercise group also lowered their levels of bad triglycerides.

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Tips to prevent a peptic ulcer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Limit alcohol to no more than two drinks daily.
  2. Stop smoking or chewing tobacco.
  3. If you need to take painkillers, avoid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as naproxen, ibuprofen or aspirin.
  4. Consider, with your doctor’s approval, paracetamol instead.
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