Sub Logo

Dr K K Aggarwal

The best gift to your grandparents is to get them vaccinated if they have not been vaccinated earlier.

  • Annual influenza or flu vaccine is recommended for all persons aged 6 months and older.
  • Pneumonia vaccine should be given to all adults aged 65 years and older.
  • Tetanus Toxoid should be given to all irrespective of age after every 10 years.
  • A single dose of herpes zoster vaccine is recommended for adults aged 60 years and older regardless whether they have had a previous episode of herpes zoster. The vaccination begins at 60 years of age.
  • Hepatitis B vaccine should be given to all if they have not been vaccinated earlier.
  • All diabetics aged 60 years or older should be vaccinated for hepatitis B. This recommendation is based on increased need for associated blood glucose monitoring in long term care facilities.
  • All patients with chronic liver diseases should also be given the Hepatitis B vaccine

Restricting salt in the diet can lower the risk of developing heart disease by 25% and the risk of dying from heart disease by 20%.

Dietary intake of sodium among Indians is excessively high. A Harvard Medical School study published in the British Medical Journal says that among hypertensive individuals, lowering sodium is quite well established to lower blood pressure, but now it has been shown that reducing salt also has an effect on cardiovascular disease.

When people with pre hypertension (blood pressure more than 120/80 and lower than 140/90), reduced their salt intake by about 25 to 35%, they were 25% less likely to develop cardiovascular disease 10 to 15 years after the trial ended. There was also a 20 percent lower death rate from cardiovascular disease among those who cut their salt consumption.

Salt restriction is best achieved by avoiding salted, salt cured and salt smoked foods such as lunch meat, hot dogs, ham, olives, pickles and regular salted canned foods, and other prepared foods, which often use more salt than homemade equivalents. Foods we would never think of as salty, such as breakfast cereals, cookies, and even some soft drinks, often contain copious additions of sodium.

Plate Your Food Now

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | No Comments»

A ‘Food Plate’ symbol has replaced the traditionally recommended ‘Food Pyramid’ of the USDA. These guidelines break down a healthy diet into 4 main quadrants on a plate: red for fruits, green for vegetables, orange for grains and purple for protein. A small blue circle attached to the plate signifies dairy products.

Fruits and vegetables occupy half of the plate space, with the vegetable portion being a little bigger than the fruit section. Eating more fruits and vegetables means consumption of fewer calories on the whole, which helps to maintain a healthy body weight. Fruits and vegetables are also a rich source of fiber along with vitamins and minerals.

The other half is divided between grains and proteins. Grains, with emphasis on whole grains make up one quarter of the plate. Protein is a smaller quarter of the plate. The recommendation is to aim to eat different kinds of protein in every meal.

In a major shift from the food pyramid, the Plate does not mention the number of servings for any food group or portion size. Nor does it mention fats and oils.

Remember the following tips for a healthy meal:

  • Eat less and enjoy your food by eating slowly
  • Fill half your plate with fruit and vegetables.
  • Avoid oversized portions, which can cause weight gain.
  • At least half of your grains should be whole grains.
  • Reduce intake of foods high in solid fats and/or added sugar.
  • Use fat–free or low fat milk and/or dairy products.
  • Drink plenty of water. Avoid sugary drinks.
  • Avoid foods that have high sodium levels such as snacks, processed foods.
  • Above all, balance your food choices with your activity level.

A combination of weight training and aerobic exercise is the best prescription for overweight patients at risk for diabetes and heart disease.

Only aerobic exercise is also good as it reduces weight and inches off the waistline. Jut weight lifting alone has very little benefit.

According to a study published in the American Journal of Cardiology, people in the weight-training group gained about 1.5 pounds and those in the aerobic group lost an average of 3 pounds and half an inch from their waists. Those who did both weight and aerobic training dropped about 4 pounds and 1 waistline inch. This group also had lower diastolic blood pressure as well as a decline in metabolic syndrome score. Both the aerobic-only group and the combined-exercise group also lowered their levels of bad triglycerides.

  • Interact with them: Instead of giving them a phone to keep them busy, spend some time interacting with them and talking to them. This will eliminate the need for a device.
  • Put computers or TVs in shared spaces: This way it will be easier to keep track of their usage and limit screen time.
  • Opt for a tech-free time: Ensure devoting few hours in a day to zero screen time for the entire household.
  • Watch your habits: If, as parents, you devote a lot of time to mobiles and computers, children are naturally inclined to follow suit. Be a positive role model for them.
  • Eat together: Meal times should be free from screens and a time for the family to sit together and eat. Make this a practice.
  • Indulge in physical activity: Ensure that the children spend sufficient time in outdoor activities. This will make them less prone to using Smartphone.

Vaccination for elderly

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Vaccination for elderly

The best gift to your grandparents is to get them vaccinated if they have not been vaccinated earlier.

  • Annual influenza or flu vaccine is recommended for all persons aged 6 months and older.
  • Pneumonia vaccine should be given to all adults aged 65 years and older.
  • Tetanus Toxoid should be given to all irrespective of age after every 10 years.
  • A single dose of herpes zoster vaccine is recommended for adults aged 60 years and older regardless whether they have had a previous episode of herpes zoster. The vaccination begins at 60 years of age.
  • Hepatitis B vaccine should be given to all if they have not been vaccinated earlier.
  • All diabetics aged 60 years or older should be vaccinated for hepatitis B. This recommendation is based on increased need for associated blood glucose monitoring in long-term care facilities.
  • All patients with chronic liver diseases should also be given the Hepatitis B vaccine.

Very low-calorie diet mimics benefits of bariatric surgery

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Very low-calorie diet mimics benefits of bariatric surgery

Marked improvement in blood sugar control occurs in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus shortly after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) and before there is major weight loss.

A study determined whether the magnitude of this change is primarily due to caloric restriction or is unique to the surgical procedure. Eleven hospitalized subjects who underwent RYGB and 14 subjects mean-matched for BMI, HbA1c, and diabetes duration were given a very low-calorie diet (VLCD) of 500 kcal/day with a macronutrient content similar to that consumed by patients after RYGB.

Frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed before and after interventions.

Both groups lost an equivalent amount of weight over a mean study period of 21 days. Insulin sensitivity, acute insulin secretion after intravenous glucose administration, and β-cell function, as determined by disposition index, improved to a similar extent in both groups.

Likewise, changes in fasting glucose and fructosamine levels were similar. Based on these data, VLCD improves insulin sensitivity and β-cell function just as well as RYGB in the short-term.

Low-heat cooking may reduce insulin resistance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Low-heat cooking may reduce insulin resistance

Traditional Ayurveda cooking recommends low heat cooking and now a western study endorses it.

Low-temperature cooking reduces insulin resistance among overweight women as per a 4-week study published in the journal Diabetes Care by Alicja B. Mark, PhD, from the department of nutrition, exercise and sports, faculty of science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues.

Cooking at high temperature, such as with baking, roasting and frying, induces formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are associated with inflammation and believed to impair glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes. Common high-AGE foods include bakery products, cooked meat and roasted coffee.

In the study, patients randomized to a high-AGE diet were instructed to fry, bake, roast, or grill their food, eat bread with the crust and choose other high-AGE foods from a list. The low-AGE group was told to boil or steam their food, eat bread without the crust, and choose lower-AGE foods from a list. They were also randomized to supplements of either fructose or glucose.

At 4 weeks, no effect was seen from fructose or glucose on insulin resistance, as assessed by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA–IR) and the calculated insulin sensitivity index (ISI) or on any secondary measures. But the AGE content of the diet did make a difference. Weight, BMI, and waist circumference all decreased in both the high- and low-AGE groups, but to a greater degree among those in the low-AGE group compared with the high-AGE group. Overall, the low-AGE group consumed about 15% more protein, 10% more carbohydrates, and 22% less fat than did the high-AGE group.

Tips to avert the risk of heart diseases

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Tips to avert the risk of heart diseases

  • Avoid smoking or quit the habit altogether.
  • Aim at getting 30 minutes to 1 hour of exercise at least 5 days a week.
  • Eat a heart-healthy diet rich in fiber.
  • Avoid saturated fat in any form.
  • Maintain a healthy body weight.
  • Keep your blood sugar, blood cholesterol and blood pressure under control.
  • Manage stress through meditation and activities such as yoga.

Slowly add fiber to diet

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Slowly add fiber to diet

Fiber is a plant substance that is required for a healthy diet. Lots of fiber is needed each day to help reduce the risk of heart disease, improve digestion, prevent constipation and maintain a healthy body weight. Fiber can be found in fruits, whole grains and vegetables. Most adults should eat at least 20 to 35 grams of fiber every day; though the doctors say most people only eat about half as much. It’s best to slowly increase the fiber in your diet instead of piling it on all at once. A sudden increase in fiber intake can cause abdominal discomfort. Fiber intake should be at least 14 grams per 1000 calories daily; higher fiber intake may improve glycemic control. Saturated fat should be less than 7 percent of calories and there should be minimal trans fat. Total cholesterol should be less than 200 mg daily. There is an average fall of 1.2/1.3 mmHg blood pressure with average 10 gram intake of fiber. Certain soluble fibers (psyllium, pectin, wheat dextrin and oat products) reduce bad LDL cholesterol. Every gram increase in soluble fiber reduces LDL cholesterol by an average of 2.2 mg/dL.

The message is incorporation of greater amounts of fiber, in which carbohydrate is derived from unprocessed whole foods.

Tips to take care of your teeth and prevent tooth decay

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Tips to take care of your teeth and prevent tooth decay

  • Brush your teeth twice daily. Brushing helps in preventing the build-up of plaque and bacteria which can cause tooth decay and periodontal diseases.
  • Floss every day as flossing helps clean the crevices where the brush can’t reach.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Avoid sugary and starchy foods as sugar in such foods reacts with the bacteria in saliva to form an acid that erodes the tooth enamel leading to tooth decay.
  • The tongue too harbors bacteria. Therefore, it is a good idea to invest in a tongue scraper and clean it each time you brush your teeth.
  • Consult a dentist if your gums are inflamed or if they bleed. Do not ignore any pain in the teeth and/or gums.
  • Get your teeth checked every six months. Dental cleaning and check-up twice a year is imperative.

Nail Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Nail Hygiene

  • Nails can harbor dirt and germs and contribute to the spread of many infections.
  • Keep nails short.
  • Trim nails often.
  • Scrub the underside of nails with soap or water each time you wash your hands.
  • Clean any nail grooming tools before use.
  • Nail grooming tools should be sterilized before use in saloon.
  • Avoid biting nails.
  • Avoid chewing nails.
  • Avoid cutting cuticles as they act as barriers to prevent infection.
  • Never rip or bite a hang nail, instead clip it with a clear sterilized nail trimmer (a hang nail is small torn piece of skin next to finger nail or toe nail).
  • Infections of the finger nails or toe nails are often characterized by swelling of the skin or thickening of the nail. These infections may be serious in some cases and need to be treated by a doctor.

Human body needs servicing too!

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Human body needs servicing too!

While automobile vehicles need preventive servicing every three months, the human body needs it every two months.

According to Ayurveda, the seasons change every two months, approximately in the middle of the month.

Ayurveda describes these changes and precautions to be taken in great detail. The current makar rashi season, which starts today with sun changing its direction northwards resulting into lengthening of day and shortening of night time needs many lifestyle changes to balance health and prevent diseases. Vata gets aggravated, kapha gets accumulated and pitta gets depleted in this season.

In allopathic language, pitta denotes metabolic functions, vata signifies movement functions and kapha stands for secretory functions of the body.

Lohri, Makar Sankranti and Pongal are celebrated with khichdi, milk, gur, bhaat, sesame (Til) laddu, light hot food and beverages, etc., all indicating measures to reduce vata and kapha and to increase pitta in the body.

Keep your baby safe and healthy – 4 tips from the CDC

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Keep your baby safe and healthy – 4 tips from the CDC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that there are about 3,500 sleep-related deaths among US babies each year.

These 4 simple sleep tips from the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) can help keep your baby safe and healthy:

  1. Babies should always be placed on their back to sleep — for naps and at night.
  2. Use a firm sleep surface, such as a mattress in a safety-approved crib.
  3. Keep soft bedding such as blankets, pillows, bumper pads, and soft toys out of baby’s sleep area
  4. Have baby share your room, not your bed.

Beware of Synthetic Milk

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Beware of Synthetic Milk

  • It is not milk and is made up of urea, caustic soda, refined oil (cheap cooking oil) and common detergents.
  • Detergents are used as they emulsify and dissolve the oil in water giving the frothy solution, the characteristic white colour of milk. Refined oil is used as a substitute for milk fat. Caustic soda is added to the blended milk to neutralize the acidity and preventing it from turning sour during transport. Urea/sugar are added for solid–not–fat (SNF), to provide whiteness in milk and natural milk taste.
  • It looks like natural milk, except in taste and nutritional qualities.
  • It is normally mixed with milk and then sold in the market.
  • It is carcinogenic in humans.
  • Urea and caustic soda can harm liver and kidneys.
  • Caustic soda with high sodium content is harmful for patients with high blood pressure.
  • Caustic soda also deprives the body from utilizing lysine, an essential amino acid in milk, which is required by growing babies.