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Dr K K Aggarwal

A symposium on Diet, Health & Religion, second in a series was held at Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan on 5th September, 2012. The Chief Guest was Shri J Veeraraghavan, Chairman, Bhavan’s KM Munshi Institute of Educational Leadership and Management.

Shri J Jolly spoke on the injunctions in Sikh scriptures, which speak about spiritual evolution of soul and earning livelihood with honesty and hard work.  Fundamentally, human is composed of body, mind and soul. A healthy body is dependent on the subtle mind, which in turn is dependent on the soul.

  • We must take good care of the body as it is the temple of God – nurture it well. One should not overeat or oversleep.
  • If we are inclined to sensual gratification, our life is cursed.
  • Gurbani does not believe in fasting or observing rituals or religious baths. What is essential is keeping the mind clean, by continuously remembering God.
  • Sweets should not be eaten in excess, the lesser we eat, more better it is for us as it reduces disease.
  • Gurbani says that we should not fight over whether we should eat or not eat meat. A person becomes vegetarian as he evolves spiritually.
  • We should not read religious scriptures and at the same time be involved in hurting others.
  • We should avoid foods that bring suffering to a body and which creates evil currents in the mind.
  • Sikhism does not restrict one to be a vegetarian but with spiritual advancements one automatically shifts towards vegetarianism.
  • Sikhism says big NO to alcohol.
  • Smoking is considered as a cardinal sin.

Ivabradine May Reduce HF Readmissions

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Ivabradine added to standard heart failure therapy reduced HF readmissions by a third in patients with systolic heart failure compared with patients on standard treatment, according to a post hoc analysis of data from the SHIFT trial, reports Jeffery S. Borer, MD, of the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn and colleagues in European Heart Journal.

The trial randomized 3,268 patients to ivabradine at a maximum dose of 7.5 mg twice daily or to matched placebo on top of beta-blocker therapy. All patients had symptomatic heart failure and left ventricular function of less than 35%.

The trial randomized 3,268 patients to ivabradine at a maximum dose of 7.5 mg twice daily or to matched placebo on top of beta-blocker therapy. All patients had symptomatic heart failure and left ventricular function of less than 35%.

Symposium On Diet, Health & Religion – Dr AK Merchant Of The Baha’i Faith

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A symposium on Diet, Health & Religion, second in a series was held at Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan on 5th September, 2012. The Chief Guest was Shri J Veeraraghavan, Chairman, Bhavan’s KM Munshi Institute of Educational Leadership and Management.

Welcoming the gathering, Shri Ashok Pradhan, Director, BVB said that the purpose of this symposium was to examine the relation between what we eat, how it affects our health and how all religions look at this aspect. Nature is also related to our health. Nature tells us what to eat. For example, summer vegetables have a high content of water. Speaking on fasting, he observed that not eating on certain days cleanses our body.

Dr AK Merchant of the Baha’i faith said, the Baha’i religion is less than 200 years old and diverse.

  • Baha’u’llah says: “Eat ye, O people, of the good things which God hath allowed you, and deprive not yourselves from the wondrous bounties…”.
  • Whatever science has said is healthy for us is welcome.
  • Majority of Baha’is are vegetarian.
  • There is no restriction as such regarding foods.
  • The Baha’i teachings permit the eating of all foods.
  • There is nothing in the Baha’i teachings about whether people should eat their food cooked or raw, nor is it forbidden to eat meat.
  • Moderation is essential.
  • One should eat only when hungry and at a fixed time to allow the body to digest food.
  • Alcohol is strictly prohibited. This includes when alcohol is taken as a drink as well as in cooking.
  • Only medically prescribed drugs should be used.
  • Tobacco and smoking are not strictly prohibited but are highly discouraged.
  • If two diametrically opposite foods are on the plate, choose only one.
  • Baha’is believe that living a simple life, abstaining from the use of alcohol and mind–altering drugs is beneficial to spiritual development, greatly reduces illness and has a good effect on character and conduct.
  • If a person can live on a purely vegetarian diet, it would be most beneficial.
  • Why certain foods are available in certain seasons have a scientific basis.
  • Food should be eaten in a healthy state of mind.
  • Whole wheat and gur  are preferred to refined flour (maida) and white sugar.
  • Mother’s milk is the best food for the child. A child who has been breast-fed has a better power of resistance.
  • Most importantly, we should show courtesy to people of other religions i.e. we should be mindful of the eating habits of other religions.
  • Fasting is very important. The Baha’i calendar has 19 days of fasting from March 2-20, which ends with the Baha’i New Year.

NIH Pilot Study Shows Feasibility of MRI to Guide Heart Catheter Procedures

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  • Heart catheter procedures guided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are as safe as X-ray-guided procedures and take no more time, according to a pilot study conducted at the National Institutes of Health. The results of the study indicate that real-time MRI-guided catheterization could be a radiation-free alternative to certain X-ray-guided procedures.
  • A report of the study, which was conducted by researchers within the intramural program of the NIH’s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), is available online in the European Heart Journal.
  • Clinical heart catheter procedures are possible without using radiation, which could be especially valuable in areas such as pediatrics.
  • MRI creates pictures of internal tissues using magnetic fields, unlike X-ray which uses ionizing radiation. In general, X-ray fluoroscopy pictures have higher resolution but less detail than MRI pictures.
  • The research team performed transfemoral catheterization (guiding a catheter from the large vein in the leg to the heart) in 16 patients to examine the right side of the heart, including the attached veins and the pulmonary arteries. The study volunteers all needed catheterization for heart and valve disease. The researchers performed the procedure in the 16 patients using X-ray guidance, and then repeated it twice using real-time MRI guidance of a balloon-tipped catheter filled with air or with a contrast agent.
  • The MRI and X-ray catheterizations were successful in 15 of the 16 participants. One patient had required the use of a wire to help guide the catheter under X-ray, and currently no guidewires are available that work under an MRI.
  • The average procedure time for the two approaches was comparable — about 20 minutes. The team expected the MRI-guided procedure to take much longer because an MRI-compatible catheter can be harder to see in an MRI-generated image than a conventional steel catheter can be in an X-ray-generated image.
  • Developing safe and conspicuous catheter devices for MRI is the chief obstacle to overcome before this approach can be widely applied at hospitals. But with improved tools and further improvement of the procedure, real-time MRI catheterization may become a realistic option for many people.

Symposium on Diet, Health & Religion:Prof Sunil Kumar

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A symposium on Diet, Health & Religion, second in a series was held at Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan on 5th September, 2012. The Chief Guest was Shri J Veeraraghavan, Chairman, Bhavan’s KM Munshi Institute of Educational Leadership and Management.

 Welcoming the gathering, Shri Ashok Pradhan, Director, BVB said that the purpose of this symposium was to examine the relation between what we eat, how it affects our health and how all religions look at this aspect. Nature is also related to our health. Nature tells us what to eat. For example, summer vegetables have a high content of water. Speaking on fasting, he observed that not eating on certain days cleanses our body.

Prof Sunil Kumar, Member, Managing Committee, Ramakrishna Mission, spoke on how Hinduism regards food and diet.

  • Hinduism recognizes that people are different because of their ‘ahaara’, which means not just diet or food we eat, but everything that our mind intakes through our 5 sense organs!
  • We are nothing but the food we eat. The subtlest part of the food that we eat goes to form the mind, and therefore the purity and quality of all ahaara not just food is important.
  • Hinduism classifies all foods as satvik, rajasic and tamasic. The Satvik prefer not to eat meat.
  • Purity of food is directly linked to purity of mind.
  • Hinduism gives one the freedom to follow your culture.
  • Austerity and self control along with Satvik food, which is fresh, simple and wholesome, is recommended.
  • Gur or jaggery is preferred to white sugar.
  • We say no to refined flour.
  • Salt should be taken in moderation.
  • Brown rice and seasonal and locally grown fruits and vegetables should be preferred.
  • Hinduism does not restrict eating eggs. Milk is considered a satvik food.
  • Hinduism does not prohibit use of alcohol, but it recognizes the harmful effects of alcohol.

20 Minutes Of Sunlight And A Glass Of Milk Can Keep Osteoporosis At Bay

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Osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiencies are the two new epidemics of the society. Drinking less milk, avoiding sunlight exposure and omitting the traditional aerobic indoor games are few reasons for these new epidemics. Most young professionals now remain confined to their offices or workplace, with practically no exposure to sunlight. This is especially true for the medical residents.

Here are a few tips for preventing osteoporosis and strengthening the bones.
1.      One should stop smoking as it increases bone loss.
2.      Eat a calcium-rich diet: The aim should be to get 1,500 milligrams of calcium a day in postmenopausal woman or a man over age 65. Good dietary sources of calcium include dairy products, tofu and other soy products, orange juice fortified with calcium, canned salmon with the bones, and cooked spinach. The alternative is to take calcium supplements.
3.      Get enough vitamin D: Vitamin D levels are influenced by how much sunlight one gets.  Levels tend to decrease in older adults, especially in winter and in people who are unable to leave their home. One should consider taking a supplement to make sure one gets the
recommended daily amount.
4.      Get exposure to sunlight of at least 20 minutes per day. The exposure should be for duration of 20 minutes every day for a month in a year.
5.      Get enough protein in diet: An adequate intake of protein in diet, combined with an adequate intake of calcium helps increase bone density. One should aim for about 12% of calories to come from proteins such as legumes, poultry, seafood, meat, dairy products, nuts
and seeds. However, too much protein with too little calcium can be harmful.
6.      Weight-bearing exercise: These are activities such as walking, jogging and climbing stairs that one should do on the feet, with your bones supporting your weight. They work directly on the bones of the legs, hips and lower spine to slow mineral loss.
7.      Weightlifting exercises: These exercises, also called resistance training or strength training. They strengthen muscles and bones in the arms, chest and upper spine. They can work directly on the bones to slow minerals loss.
8.      Get adequate vitamin K: This vitamin may be helpful in enhancing bone strength. Green leafy vegetables are the best sources of vitamin K. If one is taking a blood thinner, he or she should check with the doctor.
9.      Avoid excessive alcohol: Women should limit alcohol consumption to less than one ounce a day and men should limit it to less than two ounces.
10.     Limit cola drinks: People who have high cola intake often have lower bone density.

Symposium on Diet, Health & Religion

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A symposium on Diet, Health & Religion, second in a series was held at Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan on 5th September, 2012. The Chief Guest was Shri J Veeraraghavan, Chairman, Bhavan’s KM Munshi Institute of Educational Leadership and Management.

 Welcoming the gathering, Shri Ashok Pradhan, Director, BVB said that the purpose of this symposium was to examine the relation between what we eat, how it affects our health and how all religions look at this aspect. Nature is also related to our health. Nature tells us what to eat. For example, summer vegetables have a high content of water. Speaking on fasting, he observed that not eating on certain days cleanses our body.

 Shri J Veeraraghavan delivered the keynote address.

  • All religions regard food as holy and sacred. Our Vedas mention that all living things come from food.
  • In Christianity, there is a prayer “… Lord give us today our daily bread…”.
  • All religions place a great emphasis on moderation in diet. One should not overeat. Fasting is common to all religions. Besides physical health, fasting also helps in gaining control over oneself and for spiritual advancement.
  • Functional requirement of food for each person differs. It is for each person to decide on what is required for him.
  • Each religion has some specific restrictions about food. Some of these restrictions may be historical or geographical, while some may have spiritual aspects.
  • Bhagwad Gita says that the universal spirit – God or Brahman – is bound to nature. There are 3 types of bonding: Satva, Rajas and Tamas. Food is also classified into three: Satvik, Rajasik and Tamasik.  No one is pure Satva or Rajas or Tamas. There is a mix with one being predominant.
  • Extreme foods – very hot or very cold – are liked by rajasic people, who are very active and energetic.
  • Satvik foods are sweet and simple foods.
  • Tamas people are very sleepy and lazy. They don’t take fresh foods, which increases laziness.
  • The relation between one’s values and food is not unidirectional. There is a bidirectional relationship.

5% High Risk Patients Get Heart Attacks During Perioperative Period

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Patients with underlying heart blockages or those with risk factors are at increased risk for perioperative heart attacks. Perioperative period is the time period extending from when the patient goes into the hospital for surgery until the time he/she is discharged home.

The largest data on the subject comes from over 8000 patients in the randomized POISE trial of perioperative beta-blocker therapy, which has shown that at 30 days after the surgery the incidence of heart attack is 5 percent and 71 percent of these occur within 48 hours of surgery.  Approximately 65 percent of patients with heart attack are without symptoms.

Therefore, perioperative heart attack is not uncommon and occurs with increasing frequency as the number of identified risk factors increases.  Both short- and long-term survival are decreased in patients who have sustained a perioperative heart attack.

Treatment for perioperative heart attack is same as for any heart attack in the general population. However anticlotting drugs should be started carefully.

Perioperative heart attack is detected by presence of an elevated heart muscle injury blood test (troponin) and one or more of the following: ischemic (heart pain) symptoms, ECG changes in two contiguous leads, coronary artery intervention (balloon dilatation or stenting), or evidence of heart attack on cardiac echocardiography or autopsy.
All high-risk patients with cardiac troponin both before and after non cardiac surgery should be screened in order to detect a perioperative heart attack. Cardiac troponin levels should be measured for the following patients:
a. Patients with symptoms or ECG changes suggestive of ischemia or heart attack (2 or 3 serial biomarkers).
b. Patients at high cardiac risk (at 6 to 12 hours, and days 1, 2, and 3 after surgery)

A 12-lead ECG in the perioperative period should be done for the following patients

i.      All patients with symptoms of myocardial ischemia
ii.     All patients with risk factors for perioperative heart attack (baseline and daily for two, and possibly, three days)

Ganesha: Oh My God!

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We sing His appraisal, we worship His deity, we believe in His powers blindfolded and yet distance Him from us by pining to see what lies deep within us.  God, to which the world bows down, has infact been reincarnated into an issue of communal dispute, a reason for violence, and an agenda to be banked for something as mere as votes.  Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva or be it Allah, Waheguru or Jesus, all personify the beauty of the unpolluted soul within us which is deep-rooted and blanketed by earthly desires.

While mythological studies knit stories of the Almighty’s existence, the fact remains that human being is bestowed with the untainted potential of recognizing heavenly facets in his own self.  Ganesha, the son of Shiva and Parvati is likewise the name given to the harmonious Aacharan or characteristic disposition of man. Remembered and ritually worshiped before starting a new venture, the entity of Ganesha has in store the facets of a complete man. The magnanimous head of the Ganesha, which is that of an elephant, represents wisdom, intelligence and a healthy mind capable of making sound decisions.  Not in vain is it said that ‘think before you speak’, which implies Ganesha’s huge head, that is identified with the need for a thoughtful and retrospective attitude.  The big ears of this elephant-deity instills among the earthly man the patient channel of lending ears to the echo produced by others’ deeds and speech. It is said that half the dispute is resolved when an ear is lend most patiently.  Ganesha or the Ganapati’s extremely small mouth characteristically represents the need for a limited dialogue and the vanity of chattering. Over-expression through words triggers unsought problems many a times which otherwise could be avoided by a tight-lip.

Ganesha also represents the guru of stress affected individuals. Shiva’s most promising son, Ganesha, by virtue of his small eyes, highlights the need of a focussed outlook in life.  Such an outlook not only redefines and foresees the right goals, but also relieves one from the stress-manifested episodes from the various chapters of life.  The long trunk identifies with the power of discrimination.  The sensitivity of the Ganesha’s long nose has the strength to uproot a tree and the competency of picking up a pin from the ground.  Such should be the approach of an individual who should be capable enough to perceive the good and the bad for himself besides the undaunted strength of overcoming all odds.  The tusks and the small teeth of Ganesha should however, be recollected with the loss and gains in the life of a man. Man similarly ought to engrave his mental stature in such a manner that the ups and downs may not deter him from his honest endeavour and the balance of inevitable bliss and sorrow is maintained to add spice in the earthly existences. This stable healthy mental stature is only possible if the physical, social, spiritual and environmental requirements of the body are fulfilled. For the needful, individuals need to be bestowed upon a complete mental and physical health.

Further the big tummy of Ganapati Deva preaches the need for retaining information.  Acquiring knowledge, utilizing it and retaining it for years to come, becomes the crux of ‘big-belly commandment’.

The Char-Bhuja Dhari Ganesha, further represents strength by virtue of the four hands in which the Lord entraps his attachments, desires and greed.  Two of the arms of Ganesha, which hold rope, symbolize control over the attachments.  The laddo or sweet in the other two shows command over the desires and earthly delusion.  The mouse sitting near the feet of Ganesha represents greed and gluttony upon which the Almighty rides, propagating a control over the evils.

Ganesha’s physical traits are an assembly of the characteristics most required in an individual of substance.  Disposition incarnated with the goodness of such features will result in success in life and will positively procure an ailment-free survival. Specifically for executives, Ganesha’s characteristic principles may be incorporated in a time-table format which will help in the dawn of a conformable work-atmosphere along with congenial relationship between the management and the union of workers. Deciding the first day of the week to hear all grievance and woes of the workers, the second for thinking and planning strategies to work upon and finally setting targets to be achieved may utilize three days of the week very constructively. Further a day devoted to evaluating losses and gains (Ganesha’s teeth principle) may help additionally in business management. Retaining the information and filing all the pending work can affirmatively call upon the fifth day of the week, which works entirely on the principle of Ganesha’s tummy, which is massive by the virtue of holding tremendous loads of information.  Contemplation, discrimination and judging the good and the bad for the entire unit may take another day, leaving the Sunday for self-retrospection through meditation and yoga. One should strive and adopt Ganpati Bappa Maurya’s principles of life management rather than worshiping him with vanity.  Life has much in store besides bothering about unnecessary qualms. Giving into a disciplined attitude may assuredly dawn upon a peaceful life.  Heaven is where you are, it’s only a matter of perception which makes life as difficult as hell.

Air Quality a Temporary Trigger for MI

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Heavy air pollution can trigger acute heart attack in the hours after exposure.

Every 10 μg/m3 increase in small particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide temporarily boosts heart attack risk by 1.2% and 1.1%, respectively, as per a report in the BMJ. The chances of suffering an attack increase by 1.3% in the six hours after coming in contact with high levels of vehicle-related pollutants.

The increased risk is seen up to six hours after exposure to typical traffic-related pollutants. The take home message is that breathing in large amounts of traffic fumes can trigger a heart attack within six hours following exposure.

Ganesha, The Stress Management Guru

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If Lord Krishna was the first counselor who taught the principles of counseling, Lord Ganesha taught us the principles of stress management.

We should worship Lord Ganesha and become like him whenever we face any difficulty or are stressed out.

The elephant head of Lord Ganesha represents that when in difficulty, use your wisdom, intelligence and think differently. It can be equated to the Third Eye of Lord Shiva. Elephant is supposed to be the most intelligent animal in the kingdom.  Hear wisdom implies to think before speaking. Lord Budha later also has said that don’t speak unless it is necessary and is truthful and kind.

The big elephant ears of Lord Ganesha signify listening to everybody when in difficulty. Elephant ears are known to hear long distances. Elephant eye see a long distance and in terms of mythology, it represents acquiring the quality of foreseeing when in difficulty. The mouth of Lord Ganesha represents speaking less and hearing and listening more.

The big tummy of Lord Ganesha represents digesting any information gathered by hearing to people in difficulty. The trunk represents to use your power of discrimination to decide rom the retained information. It also indicates to do both smaller and bigger things by yourself. Elephant trunk can pick up needle as well as a tree.

The broken and unbroken teeth of Lord Ganesha represent being in balance in loss and gain. It indicates  that one should not get upset if the task is not accomplished and also not get excited if the task is accomplished. In times of difficulty, Ganesha also teaches us not to lose strength and control one’s attachments, desires and greed.

The four arms of Lord Ganesha represent strength. Ropes in two hands indicate attachment, Laddu or Sweet in one hand represent desires and mouse represents greed. Riding over the mouse indicates controlling one’s greed.

Lord Ganesha is worshiped either when one’s task is not getting accomplished or when a new work is initiated. In these two situations, these principles of Lord Ganesha need to be inculcated in one’s habits.

50% Of Adverse Drug Reactions Can Be Prevented

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Over 50% of all adverse drug reactions treated in hospitals and emergency care are preventable.

Many preventable drug reactions like drug overdoses and internal bleeding associated with the improper use of blood thinners and painkillers are life-threatening especially in the elderly. There are many reasons for these reactions and may include poor coordination of care, lack of time and knowledge among health professionals, and lack of patient education, according to Swedish researchers, who conducted a meta-analysis of 22 studies. Human error is inevitable, and therefore systems must be made to reduce the error. The study concluded that:

  • In outpatient setting, the frequency of preventable adverse drug reactions resulting in hospitalization or emergency treatment is 2% and of these 51 percent are preventable.
  • In the elderly, 71 percent of drug reactions are preventable.
  • In admitted patients the frequency of harmful drug reactions is 1.6 percent and 45 percent of them are preventable.
  • A third of preventable adverse drug reactions are life-threatening.

Draupadi Had Five Husbands And Dashrath Had Four Wives

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Does this mean polygamy was permissible in ancient era? The answer is yes.

1.       If we take mythology as what actually happened then the above storey true

2.       If we take that Puranas were only written plays on the teachings of Vedas then also it is true as the written playas are always written as per what is acceptable to the society at that era and time.  We do see the changing stories in the TV serials ad the movies. When the society was more Satvic the movies welcomed were Sant Gyaneshawar, Sasmpoorna Ramayana and in today’s Rajsic society the hero as a villain is accepted. The era where the villain has to die at the end is no more acceptable the example is Don.

Ten Bypass Grafts At A Go

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In a path breaking surgery conducted by Dr Ramakant Panda, a patient from Ludhiana was saved from a fatal heart attack after 10 separate bypass grafts were created for blood to flow smoothly from and into the heart, reports Kounteya Sinha in TOI. The eight-hour-long procedure, conducted at Mumbai’s Asian Heart Institute last week, could be the first such surgery where so many grafts were created to bypass clogged arteries.

Panda and his team took 18 cm of healthy artery from the chest (left and right mammary arteries) of 55-year-old Pawan Agarwal and divided them into 10 different grafts, which were then connected to the blocked coronary artery.  Dr Panda said, “I have done a maximum of eight grafts on a single patient in my entire career. This was the first time that 10 grafts were created. Most patients require just three grafts. But this patient was in seriously bad condition.”

Panda added, “We noticed multiple blockages in not just the three major arteries of the heart but also in its smaller branches. While we used 10 grafts to bypass blocked arteries, one artery was so badly blocked that we couldn’t create a bypass. We, therefore, additionally conducted an arterial cleansing procedure (endartectomy) to clean up the blockage.”

Number of bypasses

The terms used are single bypass, double bypass, triple bypass, quadruple bypass and quintuple bypass to the number of coronary arteries bypassed in the procedure.

1. a double bypass means two coronary arteries are bypassed

2. a triple bypass means three vessels are bypassed

3. a quadruple bypass means four vessels are bypassed

4. a quintuple means five.

5. Bypass of more than four coronary arteries is uncommon.

A greater number of bypasses does not imply a person is “more sick”, nor does a lesser number imply a person is “healthier.”

A person with a large amount of coronary artery disease (CAD) may receive fewer bypass grafts owing to the lack of suitable “target” vessels. A coronary artery may be unsuitable for bypass grafting if it is small (< 1 mm or < 1.5 mm), heavily calcified  or intramyocardial.

A person with a single stenosis of the left main coronary artery requires only two bypasses to the LAD and the LCX.

Do Your Duty With Discipline And Devotion: The Triad Represents Rama, Lakshmana And The Hanumana

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Vasudaiva kutumbakam” (the whole world is one family) and “Ekam Sat Viprah Bahudavanti” (truth is one but the wise call it by various names) are two basic statements which comes from the ancient Rig Veda and form the fundamentals of Vedic philosophy.

One should do one’s duty with devotion and discipline. This principle can be remembered as the principle of three Ds.

In daily routine ‘one should remember the purpose for which one is born, which to fulfill Dharma (duty), Artha (wealth), Kama (desire) and Moksha (liberation). To achieve them, one needs to follow the four Fs: (i) Follow the teacher, (ii) Face the negative devils of the mind, (iii) Fight till the end, and (iv) Finish at the goal.

The essence of Bhagwad Gita can be summarized in one shloka (Chapter 2.48) where Krishna says to Arjuna “yogastha kuru karmani” which means ‘concentrate on actions’ (do all actions while remaining in yoga). He further says that one should take success and failure in the same stride. (yogastha: = steadfast in yoga, kuru = perform, karmani = duties or action).

To acquire spiritual health, one should follow three Ss which are: (i) Satsang (company of good people), (ii) Sadhna (hard work) and (iii) Sanskar (good deeds). Adi Shankracharya in Bhaj Govindam describes them as Satnaam or Simran (bhakti, or reciting the name of their God), Satsang (company of good people) and Seva
(good karmas).

Before doing any work, one should follow the principles of three Hs: (i) listen with the Head, (ii) follow the Heart to choose one of the choices and (iii) order the Hands to take an action.

The ABCs of a good professional are Availability, Behavior and Competence. Competence comes the last; the first is the availability of the professional. And than is abrupt by hands.

An action should be based on Truth; it should be coming from consciousness and should end in internal bliss. Various Vedic literatures have termed this triad by different names like satha, chitha, ananda, and satyam, shivam sundaram.