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Dr K K Aggarwal

Reflexology for Cancer Symptoms

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A study led by a Michigan State University researcher offers the strongest evidence yet that reflexology can help cancer patients manage their symptoms and perform daily tasks.

Funded by the National Cancer Institute and published in the latest issue of Oncology Nursing Forum, it is the first large-scale, randomized study of reflexology as a complement to standard cancer treatment, according to lead author Gwen Wyatt, a professor in the College of Nursing.

Reflexology is based on the idea that stimulating specific points on the feet can improve the functioning of corresponding organs, glands and other parts of the body.

The study involved 385 women undergoing chemotherapy or hormonal therapy for advanced-stage breast cancer that had spread beyond the breast. The women were assigned randomly to three groups: Some received treatment by a certified reflexologist, others got a foot massage meant to act like a placebo, and the rest had only standard medical treatment and no foot manipulation.

They found that those in the reflexology group experienced significantly less shortness of breath, a common symptom in breast cancer patients. Perhaps as a result of their improved breathing, they also were better able to perform daily tasks such as climbing a flight of stairs, getting dressed or going grocery shopping.

Also unexpected was the reduced fatigue reported by those who received the “placebo” foot massage, particularly since the reflexology group did not show similarly significant improvement. Wyatt is now researching whether massage similar to reflexology performed by cancer patients’ friends and family, as opposed to certified reflexologists, might be a simple and inexpensive treatment option.

Dr Deepak Chopra Endorses Hands only CPR10

Heart Care Foundation of India completed practical training of 10500 members of the general public in hands-only cardio pulmonary resuscitation, said Padma Shri and Dr B C Roy National Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal. The campaign began on 1st November and lasted till 16th November as part of the recently concluded 19th MTNL Perfect Health Mela celebrations. The training was conducted in person by Dr Aggarwal.

The following records were made

1. Crossed 10,000 number and trained 10392 members of the public in hands-only CPR over “a period of 16 days” (1st to 16th November). A total of 12613 have been trained so far.

2. Trained 1050 children and teachers in one session in multiple rescuer hands-only CPR on 1st November 2012 at Birla Vidya Niketan School using 200 human manikins.

3. Trained 201 nurses in one session in single rescuer hands-only CPR on 9th November 2012 at Constitution Club of India, Rafi Marg,New Delhi.

4. Trained 96 physically and mentally challenged students “in one session” in single rescuer hands-only CPR on 9th November 2012.

5. Trained 2217 members of the general public “in one day” in single rescuer hands-only CPR on 8th November 2012 at Constitution Club of India, Rafi Marg,New Delhi

Releasing these statistics Dr Aggarwal said that the Foundation intends to train 100,000 people in the next one year.

Dr Deepak Chopra, New Age Guru and an internationally acclaimed author, chief guest for the function said, that hands-only CPR should be taught to every school child, health care worker and relations of heart patients. He said that every effort should be made to revive a person within 10 minutes of sudden death. It is good Karma.

The CPR manta is within 10 minutes of death, earlier the better, for the next at least 10 minutes, compress the centre of the chest, continuously and effectively, with a speed of 10×10, hundred per minute.

The general public must learn CPR as Doctors often cannot reach the site or the victim cannot be taken to the medical facility in 10 minutes. Therefore, it is the public who has to learn and provide hand-only CPR, revive the heart and take the victim to the nearest medical facility.

Harshita Gupta, a 16 years old girl form Birla Vidya Niketan successfully revived her uncle last week from Cardiac arrest.

Why We Close Our Eyes For Meditation?

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Whenever we pray, think of God, undertake an internal healing procedure, make love, kiss someone, or meditate, we automatically close our eyes.

 It is a common Vedic saying that the soul resides in the heart and all the feelings are felt at the level of heart.

Most learning procedures in meditation involves sitting in an erect, straight posture,  closing the eyes, withdrawing from the world and concentrating on the object of concentration. Yoga Sutra of Patanjali describes pratihara (withdrawal of senses) as one of the seven limbs of yoga, Yama, niyama, asana, pranayama, pratihara, dharma, dhyana and Samadhi.

 After pranayama, one needs to withdraw from the world and the senses and then start dhyana on the object of concentration. The process of pratihara becomes easy and is initiated with the closing of the eyes.

 The inward journey starts with the detachment of the body from the external world and in yogic language, it is called Kayotsarga.

 In the initiation of hypnosis also , a person is made to lie down, look at the roof and withdraw from the world. The procedure involves asking the person to gently roll the eyeball up until he goes into a trans. Rolling of the eyeballs upward has the same physiological significance as that of closing the eyes.

 When we close our eyes, there is a suppression of sympathetic nervous system and activation of para sympathetic nervous system. During this period blood pressure and pulse reduces and skin resistance goes up. A person goes into a progressive phase of internal and muscular relaxation.

 The inward journey is a journey towards restful alertness where the body is restful yet the consciousness is alert. The intention is to relax the body and than the attention is focused on the object of concentration. Most visualization and meditation techniques involve closing of the eyes.

 By detaching from the external stimuli, one suppresses the activities of the five senses and shifts ones awareness from disturbed to undisturbed state of consciousness. The inner journey helps in producing a state of ritam bhara pragya where the inner vibrations of the body become in symphony with the vibrations of the nature.

 People who visit Vaishno Devi by traveling long distances on foot enter the cave and as soon as they see the darshan of Maa Vaishno Devi they close their eyes. This is natural and instant. Because Maa Vaishno Devi is not felt in the murti but her presence is felt in the heart and that presence can only be felt by closing the eyes.

 Most yogic techniques like shavasana, yoga nidra, body -mind relaxation, progressive muscular relaxation, hypnosis involves closing the eyes in the very first step. Daytime nap is also incomplete without closing the eyes. Shoksabha and 2 minutes maun sabha are also practiced with the eyes closed. When we think of someone or try to remember something the body automatically closes the eyes and one starts exploring the hidden memories. For recalling anything one must withdraw from the external world through its five senses.

 Only advanced yogis or rishis acquire the power where with eyes opened they are in a state of ritam, bhara, pragya. These yogic powers are acquired by practicing advanced sutra meditation for hours, days and years.  Lord Shiva has been shown in a meditative pose sitting on Kailash Parvat with the eyes semi opened. But for ordinary persons like us where the aim is to be in that phase only for 20 min. twice a day, the best is to close our eyes as the first step towards the process of meditation.

5 Of The Best Workouts You Can Ever Do: Harvard Medical School

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1. Swimming: Swimming is good for individuals with arthritis because it’s less weight bearing. Swimming can improve your mental state and put you in a better mood. Water aerobics is another option. These classes help you burn calories and tone up.

2. Tai Chi: It is good for both body and mind. In fact, it’s been called “meditation in motion. Tai chi is made up of a series of graceful movements, one transitioning smoothly into the next. Because the classes are offered at various levels, tai chi is accessible, and valuable, for people of all ages and fitness levels. “It’s particularly good for older people because balance is an important component of fitness, and balance is something we lose as we get older,” Dr. Lee says.

3. Strength training: Lifting light weights won’t bulk up your muscles, but it will keep them strong. If you don’t use muscles, they will lose their strength over time. Muscle also helps burn calories. The more muscle you have, the more calories you burn, so it’s easier to maintain your weight. Strength training might also help preserve your ability to remember.

Before starting a weight training program, be sure to learn the proper form. Start light with just one or two pounds. You should be able to lift the weights 10 times with ease. After a couple of weeks, increase that by a pound or two. If you can easily lift the weights through the entire range of motion more than 12 times, move up to slightly heavier weight.

4. Walking: Walking is simple yet powerful. It can help you stay trim, improve cholesterol levels, strengthen bones, keep blood pressure in check, lift your mood and lower your risk for a number of diseases (diabetes and heart disease for example). A number of studies have shown that walking and other physical activities can improve memory and resist age-related memory loss.

All you need is a well-fitting and supportive pair of shoes. Start by walking for 10 to 15 minutes at a time. Over time, walk farther and faster until you are walking for 30 to 60 minutes on most days of the week.

5.  Kegel exercises: These exercises won’t help you look better, but they do something just as important — strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that support the bladder. Strong pelvic floor muscles can go a long way toward preventing incontinence. While many women are familiar with Kegels, these exercises can benefit men too.

To do a Kegel exercise correctly, squeeze and release the muscles you would use to stop urination or keep from passing gas. Alternate quick squeezes and releases with longer contractions that you hold for 10 seconds, release, and then relax for 10 seconds. Work up to three 3 sets of 10-15 Kegel exercises each day.

3d Projection Technology Was Available In Mahabharata Era

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Three Christie Roadster HD18K DLP projectors were used for the first-ever transmission of live, interactive 3D holograms from London and Montreal to Orlando, Florida from June 17-19, 2009.

The interactive transmission process called Musion Live Stage telepresence offers a new way for people to holographically communicate face-to-face in real time, crossing the boundaries of geographic distance.

Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi’s recently used this hi-tech 3D campaign in his election meetings delivering lectures simultaneously at four places. USD 1 million is the cost of 3D holographic projection at one site.

Modi’s speech was telecasted on specially erected screens in Ahmedabad, Vadodara, Rajkot and Surat with the help of 3D holographic technology and satellite link-ups. The BJP leader claimed this was first such election campaign anywhere in the world.

In mythology this technique was available in India. Lord Krishna danced with every Gopi and Radha at the same time.

Losing Job In Last One Year Ups Heart Attack Risk

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Unemployment is a significant risk factor for acute heart attack. The risk fades with joblessness lasting more than a year.

In the Health and Retirement Study, the risk of heart attack for people without work was 1.35 relative to the continuously employed. The risk was especially great among participants with multiple job losses during the nearly 20-year follow-up period. For those with four or more periods of involuntary unemployment, the risk was 1.63.

The study was done by Matthew Dupre, PhD, of DukeUniversity, and published in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

A study led by a Michigan State University researcher offers the strongest evidence yet that reflexology can help cancer patients manage their symptoms and perform daily tasks.

Funded by the National Cancer Institute and published in the latest issue of Oncology Nursing Forum, it is the first large-scale, randomized study of reflexology as a complement to standard cancer treatment, according to lead author Gwen Wyatt, a professor in the College of Nursing.

Reflexology is based on the idea that stimulating specific points on the feet can improve the functioning of corresponding organs, glands and other parts of the body.

The study involved 385 women undergoing chemotherapy or hormonal therapy for advanced-stage breast cancer that had spread beyond the breast. The women were assigned randomly to three groups: Some received treatment by a certified reflexologist, others got a foot massage meant to act like a placebo, and the rest had only standard medical treatment and no foot manipulation.

They found that those in the reflexology group experienced significantly less shortness of breath, a common symptom in breast cancer patients. Perhaps as a result of their improved breathing, they also were better able to perform daily tasks such as climbing a flight of stairs, getting dressed or going grocery shopping.

Also unexpected was the reduced fatigue reported by those who received the “placebo” foot massage, particularly since the reflexology group did not show similarly significant improvement. Wyatt is now researching whether massage similar to reflexology performed by cancer patients’ friends and family, as opposed to certified reflexologists, might be a simple and inexpensive treatment option.

Harvard’s Medical School’s 4 Exercising Tips For People With Diabetes

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1.   Get a “preflight” check

a.   Talk with your doctor before you start or change a fitness routine.

b.   Especially if you are overweight or have a history of heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, or diabetic neuropathy.

c.   Go for a complete physical exam and an exercise stress test for people if you are 35 or older and who have had diabetes for more than 10 years. The results can help determine the safest way for you to increase physical activity.

2.   Spread your activity throughout the week

a.   Adults should aim for a weekly total of at least 160 minutes of moderate aerobic activity, or 80 minutes of vigorous activity, or an equivalent mix of the two.

b.   Be  active at least 3 to 5 days a week.

3.   Time your exercise wisely

a.   The best time to exercise is 1 to 3 hours after eating, when your blood sugar level is likely to be higher.

b.    If you use insulin, it’s important to test your blood sugar before exercising. If it is below 100 mg/dL, eat a piece of fruit or have a small snack to boost it and help you avoid hypoglycemia. Test again 30 minutes later to see if your blood sugar level is stable.

c.    Check your blood sugar after any particularly grueling workout or activity.

d.    If you use insulin, your risk of developing hypoglycemia may be highest 6 to 12 hours after exercising.

e.   Do not exercise if your blood sugar is too high (over 250).

Be prepared

Should you experience a medical problem while exercising (or at any time) it is important that the people who care for you know that you have diabetes. Keep card handy or glucose tablets with you while exercising in case your blood sugar takes a sudden nosedive.

Meditation May Reduce Death, Heart Attack And Stroke In Heart Patients

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1. Twice-a-day Transcendental Meditation helped African Americans with heart disease reduce risk of death, heart attack and stroke.

2. Meditation helped patients lower their blood pressure, stress and anger compared with patients who attended a health education class.

3. Regular Transcendental Meditation may improve long-term heart health.

African Americans with heart disease who practiced Transcendental Meditation regularly were 48 percent less likely to have a heart attack and stroke or die from all causes compared with African Americans who attended a health education class over more than five years, according to new research published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Those practicing meditation also lowered their blood pressure and reported less stress and anger. And the more regularly patients meditated, the greater their survival, said researchers who conducted the study at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute funded the study. [Medline]

Eating flaxseed can reduce the upper blood pressure (systolic) by 10 mmHg and lower BP (diastolic) by 7 mmHg after six months. He was quoting an international double-blind, placebo-controlled study presented at the American Heart Association 2012 Scientific Sessions.

This reduction of SBP and DBP after administration of dietary flaxseed is the largest decrease in BP ever shown by any dietary intervention.

Such reductions would be expected to result in around a 50% fall in the incidence of stroke and a 30% reduction in heart attacks.

Animal studies have shown that flaxseed has antiatherogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiarrhythmic effects and may reduce circulating cholesterol and trans-fatty acid levels.

Mini-Relaxation Exercises: When you’ve Got Three Minutes

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While sitting, take a break from whatever you’re doing and check your body for tension. Relax your facial muscles and allow your jaw to open slightly. Let your shoulders drop. Let your arms fall to your sides. Allow your hands to loosen so there are spaces between your fingers. Uncross your legs or ankles. Feel your thighs sink into your chair, letting your legs fall comfortably apart. Feel your shins and calves become heavier and your feet grow roots into the floor. Now breathe in slowly and breathe out slowly. [Harvard Medical School]

In Diabetes Give Vitamin D Supplementation As An Adjuvant Therapy

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Vitamin D deficiency is associated with impaired human insulin action, suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2.

In a study of Saudi T2 diabetes patients receiving oral vitamin D3 (2000 IU/day), supplementation of vitamin D at 18 months significantly improved lipid profile with a favorable change in HDL/LDL ratio, and HOMA-β function, which were more pronounced in T2DM females.

The present interventional study performed in an Arab population suggests that daily 2000 IU vitamin D3 supplementation in a vitamin D deficient T2DM population is associated with measurable cardioprotective indices.

Supplementation to achieve higher levels of vitamin D remains a promising adjuvant therapy for T2DM patients.

 

Count down slowly from 10 to 0. With each number, take one complete breath, inhaling and exhaling. For example, breathe in deeply, saying “10” to yourself. Breathe out slowly. On your next breath, say “nine”, and so on. If you feel lightheaded, count down more slowly to space your breaths further apart. When you reach zero, you should feel more relaxed. If not, go through the exercise again. [Harvard Medical school]

Fasting Before A Lipid Profile Test May Not Be Necessary

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It may not be necessary to fast overnight before a routine cholesterol profile quoting a large community-based population study suggested done by Christopher Naugler, MSc, MD, of the University of Calgary in Alberta and published in the Nov. 12 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

In the study, the mean cholesterol subclass levels varied by less than 2% for total cholesterol and good HDL cholesterol, by less than 10% for calculated bad LDL cholesterol and by less than 20% for triglycerides.

Fasting is often inconvenient for patients and discourages compliance with routine screening programs.

On the other hand, eating before a cholesterol test can highlight insulin resistance, which is associated with worse post meal lipid clearance. High triglyceride levels after eating are predictors of insulin resistance. Total and good HDL cholesterol values do not change with food.

Current guidelines suggest that blood samples for lipid profiles should be obtained after a 9- to 12-hour fast. This requirement is not always practical for patients, who rarely present in a fasting state.

Meditation May Reduce Death, Heart Attack And Stroke In Heart Patients

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Twice-a-day Transcendental Meditation helped African Americans with heart disease reduce risk of death, heart attack and stroke. Meditation helped patients lower their blood pressure, stress and anger compared with patients who attended a health education class.

African Americans with heart disease who practiced Transcendental Meditation regularly were 48 percent less likely to have a heart attack and stroke or die from all causes compared with African Americans who attended a health education class over more than five years, according to new research published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Those practicing meditation also lowered their blood pressure and reported less stress and anger. And the more regularly patients meditated, the greater their survival, said researchers who conducted the study at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute funded the study. [Medline]