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Dr K K Aggarwal

Collective Consciousness

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Consciousness is an energized field of information with powers to do everything in the universe. Collective consciousness is the internet of the collective souls of many people in a group.  Collective consciousness is the strongest superpower ever available in the universe. As per the Vedic texts, whatever is the intent of collective consciousness will become a reality. Scientifically collective consciousness is based on the principle of critical mass. The Vedic literature has shown it to be the 1% of the defined population under study.

 

The origin of the critical mass comes from 100th monkey phenomenon. The story goes as under: long ago in Japan a monkey called Emo used to eat dirty apples everyday picked up from the ground. One day by accident the apple fell down in a river, the dirt got washed off and he ate the washed apple. Obviously it tasted delicious. The monkey started washing the apple thereafter everyday before eating. His fellow monkey started following the same. The process of following went on. A time came when the 100th monkey washed the apple and ate. A strange phenomenon was noticed. All monkeys in and around that state started washing the apple before eating. The no. 100th was the critical mass.

 

Once this mass is crossed, the information will spread like a wild fire and the intent becomes a universal reality. Vedic literature has also shown if 1% of the public of any area meditates together the crime rate of that area goes down. It also talks about the role of critical mass in prayers in achieving miracles.

 

Thus the principle of critical mass is often used in designing and organizing an event. In a movie hall of 1000 people if 10 people clap sitting in different areas everybody will start clapping. The same is true for the hooting of a particular scene. Most politicians use this principle when they organize election rallies. For a gathering of 10000, they need 100 and for a gathering of 1000 people, they only need 10 supporters who are supposed to sit in different areas and shout or clap on given directions. The Mexican way of hooting or clapping in cricket grounds also follow the same principle. For a ground like Eden Gardens with a capacity of 75,000 people you only require 750 people to control the mood of the people. This is what happened in an incident when the Indian team was hooted out by the sentence “No Ganguli no play, No Dada no play”. If Greg Chappell or Jagmohan Dalmiya had anticipated they would have used the same strategy to produce opposite result. They could have posted 1500 people (2% of the population) in the stadium shouting pro-Dravid slogans and the end result of the match could have been different.

 

Most successful leaders used this technology to lead. Extremist organizations also follow the same principle. The classical examples are the public of Kashmir and Punjab. For an extremist organization the only thing required is to sensitize 1% of the population to believe that Khalistan or Kashmir liberty is the need of the day. The same will be true to counter it.

3 simple ways for a restful sleep

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Cut down on caffeine: Caffeine drinkers may find it harder to fall asleep. Even a single cup of coffee in the morning may lead to a sleepless night. Caffeine blocks the effects of adenosine, a neurotransmitter thought to promote sleep. Caffeine can also interrupt sleep by increasing the need to urinate during the night. Because caffeine withdrawal can cause headaches, irritability, and extreme fatigue, it may be easier to cut back gradually rather than to go cold turkey. Those who can’t or don’t want to give up caffeine should avoid it after 2 p.m., or noon if they are especially caffeine–sensitive.
  2. Stop smoking or chewing tobacco: Nicotine is a central nervous system stimulant that can cause insomnia. If you continue to use tobacco, avoid smoking or chewing it for at least one to two hours before bedtime.
  3. Limit alcohol intake: Alcohol depresses the nervous system, so a nightcap may seem to help some people fall asleep. Alcohol suppresses REM sleep, and the soporific effects disappear after a few hours. Alcohol also worsens snoring and other sleep breathing problems.

Allopathic Medical Vrat

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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There was a time when everybody in India, especially women, observed fast on a regular basis. In my childhood, I saw my mother not only observing fast herself but also insisting upon my sisters to observe fast once in a week, an extra fast once in a month and observe the two Navratras in a year of 9 days each. In total, this comes out to be around 80 fasts in a year.

When I go back to my childhood, I remember the fast used to be one day of avoiding cereals altogether. We were allowed to eat Roti made of Kuttu flour, singharha flour, samak rice and dal made of chaulai (all fruits).

In our childhood, we could never understand the meaning of fast. Today India is becoming a hub of diabetes, heart diseases and insulin resistance and all of them are linked with not observing fasts or eating high carb diets every day.

The culprit is eating carbohydrates, especially, refined carbohydrates. When we recall our mythology, only one king Raja Dashrath died of heart attack. This only signifies that our mythological lifestyle was preventing heart diseases in India. The western culture which is now spreading rapidly in India involves eating carbohydrates, especially, refined carbohydrates (white sugar, white rice white maida) every day.

I recently did a survey and found that women who do weekly vrats had a lower incidence of metabolic syndrome.

Today’s girls and women do not want to listen to the word ‘vrata’ or ‘spiritual vrata’.

Therefore, they must be made to understand the same in the language of a ‘medical vrata’. The simpler version of ‘vrata’ can be – not eating carbohydrates at all once in a week and replacing them with fruits and vegetables.

I normally suggest that once in a week, one should eat only fruits and vegetables and at the most can have milk, curd. If still someone has desires, they can have besan ka chila.

Diabetics Should Undergo Cardiac Evaluation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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All diabetics should have their cardiac examination done as cardiovascular disease accounts for 65% of deaths in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Intensive and aggressive management of diabetes can reduce the risk of getting future heart attacks. As per the new guidelines, all patients with diabetes should have a blood pressure below 120/80 mmHg and fasting blood sugar lower than 90 mg%. The ABC of diabetes management is to keep abdominal circumference lower than 32 inches in women and lower than 35 inches in men, blood pressure lower than 120/80 mmHg and LDL cholesterol less than 100 mg%.

Doctor-Patient Relationship

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The doctor-patient relationship is a sacred relationship and is based on many Vedic principles, the first being that this relationship should run on the principle of detached attachment.

The doctor should be attached to the patient as long as he or she is his patient. Once the patient detaches himself with the doctor, the doctor should also detach with the patient instantly. If a doctor is too attached to a patient, he will not be able to concentrate on his work and the resultant anxiety can harm the next patient.

As per international medical ethics, there should be no personal relationships between a patient and a doctor. If by any chance a person gets attracted to a doctor or vice-versa, the patient-doctor relationship should end from that very same moment.

It is often said that doctor should not treat their own close relatives as then he/she is not likely to think of serious or worse outcomes in them and can miss diagnosis.

One should discourage casual consultations as one is likely to miss diagnosis on many occasions. Similarly, no telephonic consultations should be allowed.

Internationally, it is mandatory that a patient should be examined wearing a paper gown without his or her routine clothes. It may be an awkward situation when the patient is the doctor’s own relative

A mix of exercise protocol is better

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A combination of weight training and aerobic exercise is the best prescription for overweight patients at risk for diabetes and heart disease. Only aerobic exercise is also as good as it reduces weight and takes inches off the waistlines. Just weight lifting alone has very little benefit.

According to a study published in the American Journal of Cardiology, people in the weight–training group gained about 1.5 pounds and those in the aerobic group lost an average of 3 pounds and half an inch from their waists.

Those who did both weight and aerobic training dropped about 4 pounds and 1 inch from the waistline. This group also saw a decrease in diastolic lower blood pressure and in a metabolic syndrome score.

Both the aerobic–only group and the combined-exercise group also lowered their levels of bad triglycerides.

Best time to sign a deal is at 4 pm

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As per Ayurveda 2–6 pm in the evening and 2–6 am in the morning are the periods of Vata or creativity. Most poets and writers do their creative work during these times of the day, especially 2–6 am in the morning.

Vata period is more creative and you are less likely to make mistakes. Four PM in the evening is considered the best time to make a deal, sign a document or to send a confession note.

Apart from the time of the day Vata age is old age and Vata month is rainy season. This is one reason that we always pay attention to the advice of the elderly.

Flu in children

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • The classical features of uncomplicated flu in children include abrupt onset of fever, headache, muscle pain and malaise affected by manifestation of respiratory tract illness – sore throat, sough and nasal discharge.
  • All the above features may not be present in children.
  • Flu sometimes may last for more than a week in children.
  • Ear discharge, development into asthma and pneumonia are common complications in children.
  • Complicated pneumonia may be severe and rapidly fatal, especially if the bacterium is Staph.
  • During winter, flu should be considered in all children with fever; children with fever and acute onset of respiratory illness; children with fever and exhilaration of underlying chest condition; children with pneumonia and children with fever of more than 100, with severe cough or sore throat.
  • Fever is present in over 95% of cases, often more than 39°C.
  • Cough is present in over 77% patients.
  • Nasal discharge is present in more than 78% patients.
  • Headache is present in more than 26% patients.
  • Muscle pain is present in more than 71 % patients.
  • Incubation period is 1–4 days with high transmissibility.
  • The treatment is often symptomatic.
  • Cough hygiene should be practiced.

Doctors are God later and human beings first

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Doctors are regarded as God because their primary job is to save the life of a patient. In fact, they are the messengers of God to look after the health of the sick person. But, Doctors are God later and human beings first.

To err is human and every doctor is likely to make mistakes. The very fact that a doctor is getting himself insured under Indemnity insurance means that medical errors are recognized as a part and parcel of Government policies.

For any error, the Court has decided a financial compensation to the patient and that compensation is paid by the insurance company as the doctor is covered under the Indemnity insurance. Medical negligence on the other hand, if proved, is not covered under the insurance. Therefore, medical negligence has to be differentiated from medical errors.

The error of judgment and difference of opinion are accepted in the law as not negligence and there are ample Supreme Court judgments to support that. Medical accidents are also exempted from being termed negligence by various Supreme Court clarifications/judgments. For a doctor to be punished under medical negligence, there has to be a proof that he willfully did some omission or commission, which led to the death or caused harm to a person.

A doctor is also not required to possess the maximum degree of skill and knowledge but is required to possess only an average degree of skill and knowledge. Therefore, when an expert is called for an opinion, he should never give an opinion from his level of perception and knowledge but should take into consideration the knowledge of an average doctor of that specialty.

Recently, one of my friends forwarded a report to me, which showed that in US when the doctors went on a strike, the number of deaths in the city during the strike period reduced. I totally agree with this observation and I am of the firm opinion that if allopathic medical profession ceases to exit, the number of deaths per day will be reduced. But at what cost? It will invariably be at the cost of increased morbidity, impaired quality of life and more sufferings. In that scenario people with sexual dysfunction will live without enjoying sexual life; people with heart failure will live on the bed all the time, patients with TB will be back in sanatoriums, patients with fractures will be bedridden for months together and patients requiring orthopedic surgeries will remain with life–long deformities. To have a better quality of life, one has to pay the price as any intervention or surgery done to improve the quality of life invariably will carry some risk and mortality. Even a simple bypass surgery of the heart carries a mortality of up to 0.5–1%. But for the family whose patient dies that 1% mortality is 100%.

In a follow up program on Aaj Tak, the film actor, Aamir Khan, said that every household in India has a negative story to tell about medical doctors. Aamir probably misunderstood or could not differentiate medical errors, medical accidents from medical negligence. People equate money with medical success. Most of the medical disputes occur in private sector when the patient’s relations have to pay money for an unsuccessful surgery or treatment. Attempts have been made to compare the results of medical treatment in India from that of abroad. They are totally incomparable as the amount of fee charged by doctors in India is practically a fraction of the fee that is charged in the west. The patient load in India per doctor is also responsible for potential medical errors.

One should also remember that the Drug Controller Government of India does not inform doctors about banned drugs, introduction of new drugs or introduction of new equipment. Most doctors depend on technology to be learnt through the manufacturers of respective machines. The manufacturers either bring the training persons from abroad or support the training of Indian doctors abroad. Their interest is ultimately covered as the doctors once trained ultimately end up in purchasing their technology.

When a new drug is launched, as there is no information from Drug Controller of India to individual doctors, they are forced to attend symposia by drug companies, which now come under the purview of unethical doctor–pharma relationship.

Most doctors will write pharmaceutical drugs of a company, which people think is in lieu of a commission they are getting. The reality is that a doctor will invariably write a drug of a company who is constantly spending in efforts in educating doctors about new technologies and innovations as both Medical Council of India and the Government of India Health Ministry have no such provisions for the doctors. On the other hand, not attending medical educational programs is considered a professional misconduct by MCI and many state councils.

Check your BMI to know chances of future heart attack

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If you are less than 40 years of age, male, with a strong family history of diabetes, blood pressure or heart disease, have a normal weight as judged by Body Mass Index (BMI) but have a pot belly, or have gained more than 10 kg since the age 18, do not ignore this. Go to your cardiologist to reduce your chances of a future heart attack.

A BMI of 20 to 23 kg/m2 is associated with little or no increased risk unless visceral fat is high, or the subject has gained more than 10 kg since 18 years.

  • Subjects with a BMI of 23 to 30 kg/m2 may be described as having low risk, while those with a BMI of 30 to 35 kg/m2 are at moderate risk.
  • Subjects with a BMI of 35 to 40 kg/m2 are at high risk, and those with a BMI above 40 kg/m2 are at very high risk from their obesity.
  • At any given level of BMI, the risk to health is increased by more abdominal fat (increased weight to hip ratio, WHR), hyperlipidemia, hypertension, age less than 40 years, male sex, and a strong family history of diabetes, hypertension, or heart disease.

The body mass index (BMI) is the most practical way to evaluate the degree of obesity. It is calculated from the height and weight as follows:

BMI = body weight (in kg) ÷ square of stature (height, in meters)

Overweight is defined as a BMI between 23 and 30 kg/m2 and obesity as a BMI greater than 30 kg/m2.

The Science of Power

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Power is the ability to influence others to get a work done the way you want it.

We have seen evolution in the way power works. There was a time when Brahmins ruled using the power of knowledge; then came the era of Kshatriyas, who ruled using the physical power. This was followed by the era of Vaishyas ruling the world with the power of money and a time will come when Shudras will rule with the power of their work.

In one of his lectures, Deepak Jain from Kellogg’s said that the world has seen eras of physical power, economical power and the time has come that it will now be ruled by the power of human resources.

Former Governor of Mizoram A R Kohli, in one of his talks, said that there are four types of powers which govern the universe and these are – physical power, economical power, the power of the chair (ego) and the power of the human resource, which is based on consciousness.

Everyone has these four inherent powers. The physical power is based on fear, tamas and rajas. The economical and the power of chair are linked to one’s ego and rajas. It is the power of human resource which is linked to the soul, consciousness and Satva.

The physical power is at the level of body, economic power is at the level of mind, the power of chair is at the level of intellect and ego and the power of human resources is at the level of soul. It is the power of human resource which is based on Dharma and is universally accepted by all religions.

As per Mahabharata, the powers are the power of human resource (righteousness or Yudhishthir), power to remained focused (Arjun), power to fight injustice (Bheem), power to help others (Sahdev) and power to remain neutral during any adversity (Nakul).

In Vedic sciences, these powers are also defined as Ichhashakti (the power of desires to be with the consciousness), Kriyashakti (the power to do selfless work), Gyanshakti (the power to learn about consciousness), Chitta shakti (the power to take conscious based decisions) and Anand shakti (the power for inner happiness).

The power of human resources talks about cultivating relationships. It is not based on the principles of survival of the fittest, which is an animal behavior. The power of human resource believes in training and developing everyone to survive and become the fittest of the fit.

Gaining weight losing strength versus losing weight gaining strength

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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When we gain weight, we must acquire more strength and when we lose weight, we must lose the strength. This is a fundamental principle.

If we gain weight and feel weak, it is a disease and when we lose weight and gain strength, we are recovering from the disease. One is not supposed to gain more than 5kg of weight after the age of 20 years. Any weight gain after that will only be due to accumulation of fat, which leads to insulin resistance.

Insulin resistance does not allow food to convert into energy. In the state of insulin resistance, whatever you eat is converted into fat. As it is not converted into energy so you feel weak. When you reduce insulin resistance by drugs or walking, the metabolism becomes normal and whatever you eat gets converted into energy and you start gaining strength.

 

The spiritual meaning of the word ‘Artha’

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha are the four fundamental principles of our very existence, which means earning righteously with a desire to fulfill the inner happiness.

 

Righteous earning is called ‘Artha’ and it has been mistakenly linked to materialistic money. In mythology, Artha is synonymous with Lakshmi, Saraswati and Kali, where Lakshmi represents righteously earned materialistic wealth, Saraswati represents wealth of knowledge and Kali represents wealth of wisdom to fight the bad in you and in the society.

 

In any country, it is the wealth of knowledge, which is more important. India was ruled initially by warriors (Kali), later by money (Lakshmi) and in future will be ruled by knowledge (Saraswati).

 

It is the human resources, which today decide the growth of a company and the amount of money invested. If you have good human resources, your company is going to succeed.

 

Waist circumference a better indicator of mortality

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A high body mass index (BMI) appears to be protective in certain populations.

Abdominal obesity –– measured using waist circumference ––was a better predictor of 5–year mortality among French survivors of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) than was BMI, according to a study presented by Tabassome Simon, MD, of HA′pital Saint Antoine in Paris.

Looking at BMI, there was an increased risk of dying for those with the lowest body mass (less than 22 kg/m2) and those with the highest (35 kg/m2 and higher), but not for those in the middle of those two groups, which included individuals who were overweight and mildly obese.

Within each category of BMI, however, increased waist circumference was associated with an elevated risk of dying within the follow–up period. After adjusting for BMI in a multivariate analysis, waist circumference in the upper quartile was associated with a 44% greater risk of dying through 5 years.

Why do we regard trees and plants as sacred?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The upper part of the plants, the leaves, flowers and fruits are worshipped as sacred and offered to God. As per the Bhagwad Gita, these have satvik properties. Roots of any plant are tamsik and not offered in pooja or eaten during pooja days. The same is true for the stems of plants, which have rajsik properties. Fresh and live fruits have the same spirit and life force as in the human beings and are considered sacred the same way as any human being.

Human life also depends on plants and trees. They give us the vital factors that make life possible on earth: food, oxygen, clothing, shelter, medicines etc.

Ancient scriptures suggest the planting of a minimum of ten trees. We are also urged to apologize to a plant or tree before cutting it to avoid incurring a specific sin named soona.

Many trees and plants like tulsi, peepal etc., which also have medicinal value, are worshipped.