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Dr K K Aggarwal

Five Types of People

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Following are the five types of people:

  1. Nastik – the one who does not believe in God.
  2. Astik – for whom God exists.
  3. For them the God also exists in them (I and the God are the same)
  4. Tat Tvam Asi (God not only exists in me but also in you)
  5. God is in everybody

People who believe that God exists are fearful people and they always fear God. People who see God in themselves, live a disciplined Satvik life and do not indulge in activities which are not God–friendly.

People who believe that God is not only in me but also in you, treat every person the same way as they treat themselves.

People for whom God is everywhere always work for the welfare of the society

Don’t ignore women’ health

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Women are not diagnosed or treated as aggressively as men. Even though more women than men die of heart disease each year, women receive only 33% of all angioplasties, stents and bypass surgeries; 28% of implantable defibrillators and 36% of open-heart surgeries, according to the National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease in the US.

Although the traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease — such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and obesity — have a detrimental impact in men and women, certain factors play a bigger role in the development of heart disease in women.

  • Metabolic syndrome — a combination of increased blood pressure, elevated blood glucose and triglycerides has a greater impact on women than men.
  • Mental stress and depression affect women’s hearts more than they do men’s.
  • Smoking is much worse for women than men.
  • Low estrogen level before menopause is a significant risk factor for developing microvascular disease.
  • Though women will often have some chest pain or discomfort, it may not be the most prominent symptom. Diffuse plaques build–up and diseased smaller arteries are two reasons why symptoms can be different in women.
  • In addition to chest pain, pressure or discomfort, signs and symptoms of heart attack in women include: Neck, shoulder, upper back or abdominal discomfort, shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, sweating, light-headedness or dizziness and unusual fatigue.
  • Endothelial dysfunction is more common in women. This means that the lining of the artery does not expand (dilate) properly to boost blood flow during activity, which increases the risk of coronary artery spasm and sudden death.
  • WISE study results suggest that the commonly used treatments for coronary artery disease angioplasty and stenting are not the best options for women with more diffuse plaques.
  • Typical tests for coronary artery disease — angiogram, treadmill testing and others are not reliable in women.
  • The Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE) study showed that in some women, plaques accumulate as an evenly spread layer along artery walls, which is not visible using traditional testing methods.

Never Hurt Ego of a Person

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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It is a well known Vedic fact that if you hurt ego of a person, he will never forgive you, especially, if you have insulted or implicated him in character assassination, cast implications, financial embezzlement or in public, you call a woman as old or a man as impotent.

For example, if I hurt ego of a chowkidaar, next time if a patient comes to the hospital gate and asks where Dr. KK Aggarwal is, he only has to whisper, “Which Aggarwal, whose cases never survive?”

Also never hurt the ego of a person who is drunk. Under the influence of alcohol, a person loses his capacity to judge persons and situations. If you provoke him, he can be destructive and aggressive.

Formula of 80 to Prevent Heart Attack upto the Age of 80

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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I teach my patients that 80% of heart attacks upto the age of 80 can be prevented by learning the Formula of 80 as below.

  • Keep your lower blood pressure, fasting sugar, abdominal circumference, resting heart rate and LDL cholesterol levels all below 80.
  • Walk 80 minutes each day; brisk walk 80 minutes a week with a speed of 80 steps per minute.
  • Eat less, not more than 80 gm/80 ml of caloric food in one meal.
  • Do not eat carbohydrate-based refined cereals 80 days in a year to reduce chances of heart attack.
  • Take vitamin D through sunlight 80 days in a year.
  • Do not drink alcohol and if you drink, take less than 80 ml of whiskey in a day or less than 80 gm of whiskey in a week.
  • Do not smoke or be ready for placement of stent costing Rs. 80,000/–.
  • Give 80 minutes to yourself in a day.
  • When clapping, clap 80 times.
  • If you are a heart patient, ask you doctor to give 80 mg of aspirin and 80 mg of atorvastatin.
  • Donate blood 80 times in a lifetime to reduce chances of heart attack.
  • Avoid an atmosphere of more than 80 db of noise pollution.
  • While on treadmill, try to reach 80% of your heart rate.

To know the Mental States of a Person

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The mental state of a person in Vedic language is described in terms of gunas. The present state of mind of any person is a result of mixing of three gunas of nature called Tamoguna, Rajoguna and Satoguna. In terms of states of mind they are called Tamas, Rajas and Satwa and the nature of a person is called Tamsik, Rajsik and Satvik.

Vedas, Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita and Ayurveda all talk about these gunas. The Sankhya philosophy also says that a mixture of the three makes up the cosmic mind as well as the human mind. Bhagwad Gita talks in great detail about the Nature, Yagna as well as diet depending upon these gunas.

A Satvik diet is the one, which makes a person full of Satoguna and makes him or her with predominant Satvik nature. The same is true for other two gunas. According to Ayurvedic text and in Atharvaveda any food, which comes from the roots or underground part of the tree, is Tamsik in nature. Tamsik foods should not be eaten raw. They should either be slow cooked or soaked in water for hours before consumption.

Foods which are from the top part of the tree like coconut, fruits, leaves and flowers are Satvik in nature and can be consumed fresh, as they are. Foods which come from the middle part of the tree are often Rajsik in nature.

Fresh, soaked, sprouted, natural foods are often Satvik and old, left over foods are Tamsik in nature. Most Satvik foods are naturally white.

In Ramayana, Kumbhakaran represents a person with Tamsik nature; Meghnad and Ravana with Rajsik nature and Vibhishana with Satvik nature. One can see that the diet of Kumbhakaran was left over foods, onions, radish, carrots and non vegetarian food, all tamas producing foods.

Shastras also teaches us about Satvik food. In Vedic knowledge, God is represented by the consciousness and whatever is offered to God is the one, which is offered to consciousness and hence all offerings to God are soul–healing and soul–nurturing food items. Only Satvik foods are offered to God as one can live on Satvik food forever. Examples are dry fruits, fruits and milk. One cannot live on Rajsik or Tamsik foods; hence, they have to be taken in moderation only.

The offerings to God include honey, milk, curd, fruits and vegetables, etc. Panchamrit offered in Puja is a mixture of milk, curd, ghee, honey and sugar is a classical example.

Yogashastra also talks about the role of Satvik diet in great detail. It says people who eat less are yogi, people who eat in moderation are bhogi and people who eat a lot are rogi. The synonymous are Tamsik for Rogi, Rajsik for Bhogi and Satvik for Yogi.

In terms of proper diet, one should eat dinner lighter than lunch, eat only natural food in the night and follow the principles of moderation and variety.

Can cardiac death occur after a blunt injury?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The postmortem report of Delhi police constable Subhash Tomar who died at RML Hospital in Delhi during the anti–rape protests in New Delhi in December 2012 reportedly stated that the cardiac arrest was precipitated by blunt injuries to his neck and chest. Constable Tomar probably died of a heart attack. Whether or not he sustained some injuries from the protesting crowd, it cannot be denied that he was received in hospital in a state of cardiac arrest. He was revived for some time but ultimately succumbed to the consequences of cardiac arrest. So can blunt injury precipitate sudden cardiac death? Commotio cordis is an event, which occurs as a result of a blunt, non–penetrating and often innocent–appearing blow to the chest wall directly over the heart. This induces instantaneous ventricular fibrillation leading to sudden cardiac arrest. The person collapses and stops breathing. It becomes crucial to act fast. Immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and if available, use of automated external defibrillator (AED) will help revive the patient. If not, the outcomes are tragic with sudden cardiac death. This incident is a reminder of the fact that all of us need to learn CPR and act in time. A successful resuscitation is only possible if it is done by bystanders within 10 minutes of death, earlier the better. Remember the CPR mantra “within 10 minutes of death, earlier the better, at least for the next 10 minutes, longer the better, compress the centre of the chest of the victim effectively and continuously with a speed of 10×10 i.e. 100 per minute.”

Lessons Learnt In Medical Practice

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • One day I asked one of my patients whether you smoke or not. He said, “Kabhi kabhi cigarette peeta hoon.” I wrote on my file he smokes occasionally. His wife got upset and asked me to ask him, “What does he mean by ‘Kabhi kabhi peeta hoon’?” When asked he said that he does not smoke all the time “kabhi kabhi to ghante nikal jate hain aur me nahi pita” (Sometimes its hours that I do not smoke)
  • One day a patient came to me after three months and said, “Doc three months back I had fever and you had told me not to take any bath. All this while, I was busy and could not come to you. Can I take a bath now?”
  • Chod diya. A patient came with his wife and the wife asked me to ask the patient, “Cigarette Chod do”. I also counseled and said, “Cigarette Chod do.” A few weeks later, he said, “Chod diya.” There are four meanings of Chod diya:
    • Biwi ko Chod diya
    • Doctor ko Chod diya
    • Dono ko Chod diya
    • Cigarette ko Chod diya
  • After an echo test, one of my patients asked a technician, “Can I eat?” and my technician told, “You can eat after one hour.” A few minutes later, the patient came to me and asked me the same question without telling me that he had already asked my technician. I said, “You can eat.” He said, “Your technician said after one hour.” I was in an embarrassing position. I said to make it light, “He asked you not to eat for one hour and not for the patient.”
  • One of my patients said that he never drinks more than three pegs. His wife said, “Don’t believe in him. After three pegs he does not remember how many pegs he drinks.”
  • There are funny examples of cigarette smoking:
    • Smokers do not grow old (as they die in young age)
    • Smokers do not get a second heart attack (most die in the first attack)
    • Smoking cures cancer (most smoke–related lung cancers have only six months life)
    • Thieves do not come into the smoker’s house as he coughs throughout the night.
    • Smokers’ brothers do not fight for property (their property has already gone to hospitals for treatment of smoking–related disorders)
    • Smoker’s wife does not suspect him (smoking leads to impotence).

Gaining Weight Losing Strength versus Losing Weight Gaining Strength

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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When we gain weight, we must acquire more strength and when we lose weight, we must lose the strength. This is a fundamental medical principle.

If we gain weight and feel weak, it is a disease and when we lose weight and gain strength, we are recovering from the disease. One is not supposed to gain more than 5kg of weight after the age of 20 years. Any weight gain after that will only be due to accumulation of fat, which leads to insulin resistance.

Insulin resistance does not allow food to convert into energy. In the state of insulin resistance, whatever you eat, it is converted into fat. As it is not converted into energy and you feel weak. When you reduce insulin resistance by drugs or walking the metabolism becomes normal and whatever you eat gets converted into energy and you start gaining strength.

The spiritual meaning of the word ‘Artha’

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Dharma, Artha, Kama and Moksha are the four fundamental principles of our very existence, which symbolize earning righteously with a desire to fulfill the inner happiness.

Righteous earning is called ‘Artha’ and mistakenly it has been linked to materialistic money. In mythology Artha is synonymous with Lakshmi, Saraswati and Kali where Lakshmi represents righteously earned materialistic wealth, Saraswati represents wealth of knowledge and Kali represents wealth of wisdom to fight the bad in you and in the society.

In any country, it is the wealth of knowledge which is more important. India was ruled initially by warriors (Kali), later by money (Lakshmi) and in future will be ruled by knowledge (Saraswati).

It is the human resources, which today decide the growth of a company and the amount of money invested. If you have good human resources, your company is going to succeed.

Avoid Drunk or Drugged Driving

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The dangers of drinking alcohol and driving are well known to all. But, it is also important to recognize that taking drugs and driving too can be as dangerous. Drunken driving or driving under the influence of any drug that acts on the brain can adversely affect your vision, reaction time and judgment and driving skills. This not only endangers your life but also of your co-passengers as well as others on the road.

Tips for safe driving

  • All through the year, especially during the holiday season, take steps to make sure that you and everyone you celebrate with avoid driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.
  • Always designate a non–drinking driver before any holiday party or celebration begins.
  • Arrange for someone to pick you up
  • Do not let a friend drive if you think that they are under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. Take the car keys.
  • Stay overnight at your friend’s place, if possible and drive back home in the morning.

Thinking Differently

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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There are three ways to manage stress. One is to think opposite, second is to think different and the third is to think positive.

Thinking opposite was advocated by Patanjali, thinking differently by Adi Shankaracharya and thinking positive by Gautam Buddha. Out of three approaches, the Indian Vedic philosophy focuses on thinking differently. Thinking positive and thinking opposite may not be feasible at the time of any adversity.

Thinking differently has been emphasized in mythology at multiple places. Ten heads of Ravana, five heads of Brahma, elephant head of Lord Ganesha, Fish incarnation of Lord Vishnu and third eye of Lord Shiva remind us of the principle of thinking differently.

We can see or analyze a person or a situation with the eyes of our physical body (physical eye) or eyes of the mind (thinking and analyzing) and eyes of the soul (conscious based decision).

Lord Buddha once said that a good action should be based on truth, should be necessary and bring happiness both for the person doing it and the society.

The 3H principle advocated in the West is also based on the same which means before any action think from your Head and from multiple options available, choose from the Heart and then order the Hands to do the job.

The first incarnation of Lord Vishnu Fish indicates the capacity of swimming against the stream. The third eye of Lord Shiva means thinking from the mind and choosing the right answer from the heart. The ten heads of Ravana and five heads of Brahma also indicate thinking to get multiple options.

The example of thinking differently comes from the dialogue between Urvashi and Arjuna. Once Urvashi in a mind full of Kama went to Arjuna and said “If you are not going give me a son like you today, I am going to give you a curse”. Arjuna was in a dilemma but he thought differently and said – “Why do you want to wait for 25 years to get a son like me from today I am your son, Mother.”

Malaria

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Malaria is transmitted by the bite of a female Anopheles mosquito.
  • The malaria mosquito bites mainly between dusk and dawn. While, the dengue mosquito bites during the day.
  • Malaria can also transmit by blood transfusion by sharing of contaminated needles.
  • Bed nets are good against malaria since major malarial vectors bite during the night.
  • Mosquito’s behavior may differ. Some may prefer to rest indoors and feed indoors in the night. Some may prefer to rest and feed outdoors earlier in the day.
  • Preventive therapy of malaria can be instituted in pregnancy in high risk areas.
  • The malarial mosquito feeds every third day compared to dengue mosquito, which feeds three times a day.
  • Malarial fever presents with chills, especially during afternoon.
  • Spraying of the indoor residential walls and ceiling is effective against mosquitoes.
  • DDT is widely used as indoor residential spraying.
  • DDT should not be applied more than once or twice early in the walls.
  • Mosquito contact with DDT surface would generally save from lethal exposure outside the house.
  • Public must know that spray may require furniture rearrangement. Walls may become streaked with chemical treatment and residual odor from DDT.
  • The other alternative is malathion spray.

Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In a survey conducted by Heart Care Foundation of India of 400 people from all walks of life, 90% of the people wanted that wishes of the dying person and dead body should be respected in the hospital setting. They said that doctors should be more compassionate and emphatic at the time of declaring a patient dead.

Unless people are expecting a death, death usually comes as a shock to the family members. It is expected that the relatives may be in agony, pain and even anger. Every hospital should have a mourning room where relatives should be made to sit, counseled and death declared.

After death is declared, the treating doctors, nurses and hospital staff must sit with the patient’s relatives, counsel them, tell them about the sequence of what happened before death and also counsel them about how to handle the dead body. People also want to know the cause of death so that similar thing may not happen to another person in the family.

They also want to know if the body is infectious or not and what rituals should not be done if the body is infectious. They also like to know about how to preserve the dead body till cremation.

They may also like to know whether a postmortem is required to know exact cause of death, which can help future family members of the family.

Lifestyle can prevent 50% of common cancers

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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More than 50% of cancers could be prevented if people simply change lifestyles, according to Graham Colditz, PD, DrPH, from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri at the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) World Cancer Congress 2012.

Among the “biggest buys” from lifestyle intervention is smoking cessation. One third of cancer in high–income countries is caused by smoking.

Being overweight or obese causes approximately 20% of cancers today. If people could maintain a healthy body mass index (BMI), the incidence of cancer could be reduced by approximately 50% in 2 to 20 years.

Poor diet and lack of exercise are each associated with about 5% of all cancers. Improvement in diet could reduce cancer incidence by 50% and increases in physical activity could reduce cancer incidence by as much as 85% in 5 to 20 years.

Eradicating the main viruses associated with cancer worldwide by implementing widespread infant and childhood immunization programs targeting three viruses — human papillomavirus and hepatitis B and C — could lead to a 100% reduction in viral–related cancer incidence in 20 to 40 years.

Tamoxifen reduces the rate of both invasive and noninvasive breast cancer by 50% or more, compared with placebo, at 5 years.

Raloxifene has been shown to reduce the risk for invasive breast cancer by about 50% at 5 years.
Bilateral oophorectomy in women carrying the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, although rare, has been associated with a 50% reduction in breast cancer risk among high-risk women.

Aspirin is associated with a 40% reduction in mortality from colon cancer.

Screening for colorectal cancer has a similar magnitude of mortality reduction (30% to 40%).

Neti–Neti (Not This Not This)

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The main figure in the Upanishads is the sage Yajnavalkya known as one of the greatest philosophers. He taught the great doctrine of neti–neti, the view that truth can be found only through the negation of all thoughts about it.

Brhadaranyaka Upanishad is the oldest and the most important of all the Upanishads. Its name actually means the great forest–book.

Sage Yajnavalkya’s dialogues with his wife, Maitreyi are featured in the Muni Kanda or Yajnavalkya Kanda. The doctrine of neti–neti suggests the indescribability of the Brahman, the Absolute. Yajnavalkaya attempts to define Brahman.

Atman is described “neither this, nor this” neti–neti. The Self cannot be described in any way. Na–iti – that is Neti. Through this process of neti–neti you give up everything – the cosmos, the body, the mind and everything – to realize the Self.
Once the Atman is defined in this manner are you become familiar with it, a transformation takes place as realization dawns that the phenomenal world and all its creatures are made up of the same essence of bliss.

Brahman is infinite, amorphous, colorless, characterless and formless Universal Spirit, which is omnipresent and omnipotent, and like cosmic energy, is pervasive, unseen and indescribable.

Neti–neti Meditation: The principle of neti–neti has been used in meditation involving gnana yoga. Whenever a thought or feeling that is not the goal of the meditation, or is not the soul or the inner self, comes to mind, the meditator simply has to say, “Not this, not this,” and dismiss the thought, image, concept, sound, or sense distraction. Any thought, any feeling, is patiently discarded — again and again if necessary, until the mind is clear and the soul/or the self is revealed.
Neti–neti and the mind: When you get into the habit of neti–neti, you can also discard thoughts of worry, doubt, or fear, and become established in the light of your inner self. You can, then, look back at worries and fears with deep insight and handle them.
Neti–neti and the medical profession: One of the basic medical teachings is to diagnose a condition by way of excluding other similar conditions. This is called differential diagnosis and this is the mainstay of allopathy. This also makes one investigative–oriented but is the only scientific way of knowing the truth.
Neti–neti and multiple–choice questions: In any modern exam today, the principle of neti–neti is used. A question has about four nearly similar answers and the student has to answer the correct one. He can only answer by the principle of negation.
Neti–neti and police investigations: This principle is also used while handling a criminal case. Everyone is a suspect in the crime initially, until a process of elimination clears them.