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Dr K K Aggarwal

Non–alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Independently Predicts Prediabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Non–alcoholic fatty liver disease has been linked to increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. A new study in Liver International 2013;33(9):1406–1412 evaluated the independent role of NAFLD in predicting the development of pre–DM in a 7–year prospective follow–up of healthy volunteers.

A prospective cohort of a subsample of the Israeli National Health Survey was evaluated at baseline and after 7 years by identical protocols. Metabolic parameters and ultrasonographic evidence of NAFLD were evaluated in 213 subjects, without known liver disease or history of alcohol abuse. Exclusion criteria were pre–DM at the baseline survey. Steatosis was quantified by ultrasound with the hepatorenal ultrasound index (HRI).

The study included 141 volunteers (mean age 48.78 ± 9.68, 24.82% with NAFLD) without pre–DM/DM at baseline. Both NAFLD on regular US (OR=2.93, 1.02–8.41 95%CI) and HRI (OR=7.87, 1.83–33.82) were independent predictors for the development of pre–DM, adjusting for age, gender, BMI, family history of DM, baseline insulin, adiponectin and glucose. Further adjustment for physical activity and dietary intake did not weaken the association. Furthermore, NAFLD was a stronger predictor for pre–DM than the metabolic syndrome. Subjects with both NAFLD and glucose =89 had 93.3% incidence rate of pre–DM. The study concluded that non–alcoholic fatty liver disease is a strong and independent risk factor for pre–DM in the general adult population; thus, NAFLD patients should be classified as a population at risk.

What is the importance of Govardhan Pooja?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Mistakes of the intellect are responsible for the disturbed state of mind. Even if the mind is under control, the intellect can disturb the mind. It is the discriminative faculty of the mind and can be very destructive. It is the main cause of ignorance. External desires and the uncontrolled five senses are responsible for it. Kama, Krodha, Lobha and Moha are the causative factors.

In mythology, Krishna won over the intellect- symbolized by King Indra, the one who controls the indriyas and the senses. Govardhan pooja is the example of winning over the intellect. The same can only be done by one point concentration on the object of concentration. Krishna raised the mountain (the problem) on his one finger (one point determination) to save the people from heavy rains (turmoil of thoughts).

It means taking one point decision (one finger) whenever the mind is indecisive (Mountain) with multiple possibilities (rain).

Only when the mind body and soul are purified after one month Yagna (first Navratra to Diwali) can one use the intellect to take one point decisions.

Govardhan pooja can also be understood by the following story.

Once a disciple asked his Guru about the difference between a girlfriend and wife. The Guru asked him to go to the tomato field and pick up the largest and most colored tomato but put a condition that once he had crossed one line he could not return back.

The disciple went and saw a large tomato in the first row. He went ahead and found a larger tomato in the next row. Thinking that the subsequent rows would have still larger tomatoes he went on further and further. In the seventh row he found a very large red tomato but in search of finding a still larger tomato he left it and went to next row only to find smaller and smaller tomatoes in the subsequent rows and ultimately came empty handed. The Guru said this is the example of search for a girlfriend.

Four days later the Guru asked the disciple to do the same exercise again. This time in the fifth row the disciple found a very large red tomato, got satisfied, plucked it and came back. When the guru asked why he did not search further, he said that that once he decided on that tomato his mental turmoil to search further stopped. It did not bother him anymore that a still larger tomato may have been ahead. The Guru said this is an example of the search for a wife.

Govardhan pooja means stopping your search at some point and being satisfied with what you get or learning to make a stop to all your desires at some point in your life.

How do you know if you need a hearing test? If you answer yes to any of the questions below, talk with your doctor about having your hearing tested:

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Are you always turning up the volume on your TV or radio?
  • Do you shy away from social situations or meeting new people because you’re worried about understanding them?
  • Do you get confused or feel “out of it” at restaurants or dinner parties?
  • Do you ask people to repeat themselves?
  • Do you miss telephone calls — or have trouble hearing on the phone when you do pick up the receiver?
  • Do the people in your world complain that you never listen to them (even when you’re really trying)?

You can also ask a friend to test you by whispering a series of words or numbers. After all this, if you think you have a hearing problem, you should have a test.

Diwali The Festival of Inner Purnima on Outer Amavasya

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Diwali is celebrated on the day of Amavasya but the festival is symbolized by inner happiness, lighting or Purnima.

Moon in mythology symbolizes cool positive thoughts. Normally, one encounters negatives thoughts on the day of Amavasya and positive thoughts on the day of Purnima.

Diwali is the only day in a year where one experiences positive thoughts on the day of Amavasya, hence some people believes Diwali symbolizes inner Purnima and out Amavasya.

Diwali celebrations also coincide with the terminal phase of Chaturmas, the four months of negative state of mind.

The purification process in Chaturmas starts with 1st Navratra falling on Amavasya. During these nine days, one undergoes mind, body and soul detoxification by not thinking negative, doing positive things and acquiring soul based knowledge.

The mind, body detoxification during Navratra ends with killing of Tamas (Kumbhakarna), Rajas (Meghnath) and ego (Ravan) and of consciousness (Rama) over the evil.

These benefits do not lead to inner Moksha or happiness until 20 days, the day of Diwali. In order to continue getting benefits of Navratra, one should fast in a positive state of mind every fourth day till Diwali.

On Sharad Purnima, the fast involves thinking positive with a cool mind to get health benefits. Four days later, on Karvachauth again, one fasts and worships the Moon with positive thoughts and acquires longevity benefits. Four days later on Ahoi Ashtami again, one worships the moon and the stars with positive thoughts and acquires fertility benefits. On the day of Dhanteras one acquires a win over the fear of death (Yama). On this day, the fast involves deeper meditation (Samudra manthan) to get all the benefits of Samadhi.

At the end of the meditation in the state of Samadhi, one gets in touch with the consciousness or the God, the insight gets illuminated and a person experiences bliss, a state of ecstasy of inner happiness and that is what is called experiencing inner Purnima on the day of outer Amavasya and the festival is celebrated as Diwali.

Let us all worship this Diwali as a state of positive mental state. This one month of purification of thoughts helps one in combating the depression phase seen in winter.

Diwali is the only Amavasya where one does not do Shradh pooja.  On Diwali Amavasya (falling in Chaturmas) one is allowed to start any new project. Even deaths on this Amavasya are considered auspicious (unlike on other Amavasya days).

UNIC becomes supporter of Perfect Health Mela

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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UNIC becomes supporter of Perfect Health Mela

15 October 2014: New Delhi India:

UNIC New Delhi joined NGO Heart Care Foundation of India in presenting a five-day Perfect Health Mela organized 15 -19 October at the Talkatora Indoor Stadium in New Delhi. Renowned dignitaries such as India’s Attorney General  Mukul Rohatgi, President of the Delhi Unit of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party Satish Upadhayay and New Delhi Municipal Corporation Chairman Jalaj Srivastava, joined UNIC Director Kiran Mehra- Kerpelman in inaugurating the health advocacy fair.

 

Started in 1993, the Perfect Health Mela is a mass health awareness module, which caters to people from all age groups and walks of life. Its primary activities include health check-up camps, entertainment programmes, lifestyle exhibitions, workshops and inter college and school competitions.  This year’s Mela was organized in joint collaboration with the New Delhi Municipal Corporation and the UN Information Centre for India and Bhutan, along with  several other corporate and government partners.

 

Speaking at the inauguration ceremony, the President of Heart Care Foundation of India, Dr. K.K. Aggarwal said: “We at Heart Care Foundation of India are extremely delighted to organize the Perfect Health Mela that promotes the concept of “Swach Bharat, Swasth Bharat” (Clean India; Healthy India!)  By simply observing hygiene in water and environment, up to 50% of the diseases can be prevented!”

 

In her address, UNIC Director Kiran Mehra-Kerpelman called attention to the UN’s Global Handwashing Day being observed that very day. She said: “We have to realize how the small steps which we take make a much larger difference than we can ever see or know. For example, washing your hands today could prevent you from getting a disease that might cost you or your parents a huge amount of money to treat – if you saved that money, you could use it to give yourself a better education, to get a better job, to build a better life for yourself and your family in the future. It is in our minds, our actions and our lives that we must create a change.”

 

Later UNIC Director joined all the dignitaries in participating in a CPR practice session. She was also given the National Excellence Award 2014 by the Heart Care Foundation of India and its partners.

 

Many people indulge in drinking alcohol on Diwali and gamble

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Many people indulge in drinking alcohol on Diwali and gamble. It is the duty of the host to see that alcohol is not served to people who would be driving themselves home. They should take away their car keys and get them dropped by an arranged driver or by car poling.

After consumption of 30ml of alcohol (whiskey), one should not drive for the next one hour. For every subsequent 30 ml of alcohol, one should add one hour of not driving.

Alcohol takes away the power of judgment and one may end up with accidents.

Drunken driving and using a mobile while driving further compound the problem.

Gambling in Indian Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Gambling is mentioned as part of Diwali celebrations in the story of Mahabharata. It teaches us about taking calculated risks in life. In Mahabharata it teaches that excess of everything is bad. If Yudhishthira had not risked Draupadi on that day while plying dice, there would have been no Mahabharata. The same divine dice game became a vice for that moment. Even if you lose, one should not lose heart and take conscious based decisions. Krishna (consciousness) saving Draupadi (material things in life) means the same.

On the day of Diwali, one starts with new projects in life and taking calculated risks makes sense. Gambling on Diwali can be a symbolic game but should not become a vice. According to mythology, Goddess Parvati enjoyed playing dice with Lord Shiva on this day. It is a popular saying that those who cling to virtue at this festival time, refusing to gamble, will be reborn as donkeys. Mean its foolishness not to take calculated risks in business.
Losing and winning is part of life and one must learn to balance the two states of mind.

The type of food you eat also matters

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Everyone needs a mix of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats, plus enough vitamins and minerals for optimal health. But some of the food choices within these categories are better than others.

  1. Added sugar: Whether it’s white granulated sugar, brown sugar, high– fructose corn syrup, corn sugar, or honey, sugar contains almost no nutrients and is pure carbohydrate and full of empty calories, causing blood sugar to rise and fall like a roller coaster. Soft drinks and other sugar–sweetened beverages are the primary source of added sugar in the diet and a major contributor to weight gain. One extra 12–ounce can of a typical sweetened beverage a day can add on 15 pounds in a year. Those liquid calories aren’t as satisfying as solid food.
  2. Dairy fat. Ice cream, whole milk, and cheese are full of saturated fat and some naturally occurring trans fat both bad for the heart. The healthiest milk and milk products are low–fat versions, such as skim milk, milk with 1% fat and reduced–fat cheeses.
  3. Baked sweets. Cookies, snack cakes, doughnuts, pastries etc are packed with processed carbohydrates, added sugar, unhealthy fats, and often salt.
  4. White carbohydrates. Bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, cookies, cake, or pancakes are bad. One should opt for whole–grain versions. One can choose homemade cookies or bars using grains such as oatmeal, and less sugar and unhealthy fats.
  5. Processed and high–fat meats. Meats like bacon, ham, pepperoni, hot dogs, and many lunch meats are less healthy than protein from fish, skinless chicken, nuts, beans, soy, and whole grains. Fresh red meat should be eaten sparingly and the leanest cuts selected.
  6. Salt. Current dietary guidelines recommend reducing sodium to 1,500 mg per day and not exceeding 2,300 mg per day. But most of us get 1½ teaspoons (or 8,500 mg) of salt daily. That translates to about 3,400 mg of daily sodium.

The Churning of the Ocean on Dhanteras: Samudra Manthan

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Many of us know the story of ‘Sagar Manthan’ or the churning of the ocean. The story goes like this.

Once Indra lost his kingdom due to the disrespect he showed to sage Durvasa. He approached Lord Vishnu, who advised him to seek the help of the demons to churn the ocean of milk (Ksheer Sagar), so that he and other Devas could take the Amrita (ambrosia) that would make them immortal and help them regain their lost kingdom.

As per his advice, Devas approached the demons, and they all agreed in the end to churn the ocean of milk. They sought the help of mount ‘Mandhara’ and the great snake ‘Vasuki’ for this purpose. Vasuki, the snake God, was used as the rope and Mandhara, the mountain, as the churning stick to churn the ocean. While they were churning the great ocean, Lord Vishnu assumed the form of a tortoise and held the Mandhara from sinking. While the churning was going on, several wonderful objects came out of the ocean.

The first to come out was ‘Halahal’, the deadly poison, which threatened to engulf the world and destroy it. When no one was willing to accept the poison, Lord Shiva came forward to accept it. He swallowed it and Parvati who was standing beside him, pressed his neck as he swallowed it and thus, prevented it from going into his stomach. Thus the poison remained stuck forever in his neck, neither going up into his mind nor going down into his stomach. Then came Kamadhenu (the wish-fulfilling cow), the Ucchaisrava (the white horse), Airavata (the white elephant), Kaustubhamani (a rare diamond), Kalpavriksha (the wish-fulfilling tree), Lakshmi (the goddess of wealth), Sura or Varuni (the goddess of wine) and finally Dhanvantari (the divine physician) with the vessel of Amrita in his skilful hands. These objects, except the last one, were divided between Devas and the demons.

The nectar of immortality was, of course, finally denied to the demons and was distributed among Devas only, through a fine piece of trickery enacted by Lord Vishnu. He assumed the form of Mohini to delude the demons and make them temporarily forget all about the ‘Amrit’, while he went on distributing it among the gods who took it. Because of the effects of ‘Amrit’, they not only became immortal but also defeated the demons summarily. But two of the Daityas (demons) managed to partake of the Amrit. And they both became immortal. Therefore, the strife between good and evil continues to this day.

Spiritual Symbolism

The story represents the spiritual endeavor of man for achieving immortality and inner happiness through concentration of mind, withdrawal of senses, control of desires and practice of austerities and asceticism.

  1. The Devas represent the pleasure principle in us. They also represent the senses.
  2. The Demons represent the pain principle and the negative thoughts and impulses.
  3. Indra represents the Intellect, which can become egoistic.
  4. Ksheer Sagar or the ocean of milk is the mind or the human consciousness. The mind is always compared to an ocean (mano sagaram) while the thoughts and emotions to the waves.
  5. Mandhara, the mountain stands for concentration. The word “mandhara” contains two words “man” (mind) and “dhara” (a single line), which means ‘holding the mind in one line’. This is possible only during mental concentration. The mountain Mandhara was upheld by Lord Vishnu as a tortoise.
  6. The tortoise stands for the withdrawal of the senses into oneself as one practices mental concentration and meditation or contemplation. It also suggests that the mind should rest upon itself or freely surrender itself to the divine will.
  7. The participation of both Devas and the demons signify the fact that when one is seeking immortality through the spiritual practice, one has to integrate and harmonize both the positive and negative aspects of one’s personality and put both the energies for the common goal.
  8. The great serpent Vasuki stands for desire. The desire is always compared to a thousand hooded serpents.
  9. Halahal represents the turmoil of mind one suffers in the initial phase of meditation
  10. The celestial gems represent the spiritual powers or the Siddhis one can attain during meditation
  11. ‘Amrit’ or nectar represents the inner happiness
  12. Immortality represents Moksha.

The story represents the need for doing meditation (churning of the mind in the ocean) to gain control over ego, which takes over when the mind and intellect (Indra) lose their track.

The process involves intention to do the meditation (Devas approach Vishnu or the consciousness who in turn advises to do the manthan) and attention (focus, concentration) on the object of concentration (God or consciousness and here the tortoise).

The process involves concentrating on a mantra or the breath continuously and giving preferences to the object of concentration over the thoughts. Meditation is incomplete without withdrawing the senses (tortoise). By yoga sutras of Patanjali, it is called ‘pratihara’ by creating a spiritual atmosphere. The contemplation or the continuing concentration is a must (mandhara).
Meditation is the process of slipping in the silent gaps between the thoughts. Negative thoughts are the Asuras, the devils or the demons. Meditation involves bypassing the thought and needs both the positive and the negative thoughts to cooperate with each other like in a rope.

While meditating, one is bound to be affected by a chain or rope of desires (Vasuki). The same needs to be tightened up caught firmly by the thoughts, and ignored by giving preference to the object of concentration, the self (the tortoise). When in difficulty, everyone has to take the help of God (in the form of Mohini).

To summarize, Vasuki used in the churning of the ocean denotes that Devas and the demons held desire (to seek immortality) as a rope and churned the mind with the help of concentration and withdrawal of the senses. You can hold the desire in your hands and manipulate it only when you have control over your desires.

In the initial phase of meditation or intense churning by opposite forces, one is affected by turmoil of the mind. Most people who start meditation leave it in this phase only, as they cannot bear this turmoil and get agitated or disturbed. That is one reason it is said that one should learn meditation under the guidance of a teacher, doctor or a guru.

The Halahal represents this suffering and pain one undergoes at the beginning of spiritual Sadhna. The problems get intensified because of inner conflicts, when one part yearns to pursue the spiritual path (Devas) while the other opposes it (demons). In short, ‘Halahal’ is the instability of the body and the mind that arises as a counter-reaction against one’s spiritual practice.

One can compare this to the release of the mental toxins comparable to the physical toxins, which are released when we rest and after a daylong rest complain of leg pains.

The mental turmoil representing all kinds of reactions, negative thoughts, desires and impulses associated with some degree of physical turmoil (body movements, flickering and tingling) need to be tackled here to complete the process of meditation.

One cannot take out these negative thoughts in the open nor can one keep it in (you cannot throw the Halahal out or swallow it). It needs to be managed or ignored by keeping it in the throat which is what was done by Shiva. Shiva here represents the ascetic principle (leading a life of self-discipline and self-denial).

It also means that another mode of controlling the turmoil is by controlling the breath. Shiva is the controller of breath and is called a ‘prananath, or praneshwar’ – The Lord of Breath. In meditation, it is essential that one has complete mastery over one’s breathing pattern. Most sages hold their breath in their throat, near the palate, as they meditate to control this turmoil of mind.

The various objects that came out of the ocean during the churning stand for the psychic or spiritual powers (siddhis), which one gains as one progresses spiritually from stage to stage.

These siddhis are spiritual powers, which come to a seeker as he progresses on the spiritual path. We are told that a seeker should be careful about these powers as they can hamper his progress unless he uses them judiciously – not for his selfish gains but for others’ welfare. This is the reason why the gods and demons distributed these powers among others without keeping anything for themselves as they did not want to lose sight of their original aim, which was to gain immortality (inner happiness).

Dhanvantari stands for health. The vessel containing the Amrit was brought before the Gods and the demons by Dhanvantari, the divine physician. This signifies that immortality can be achieved only when the body and the mind are in a perfect state of health.

Lord Dhanvantari is worshipped on Dhanteras, 2 days before Diwali as the lord of Ayurveda. He has four hands with herbal medicines, Ayurveda book, Amrit kalash and a Shankh in each arm. They define the principles of treatments: herbal drugs for the physical body, pranayama and mantras represented by Shankha for the mind, rasayanas for spiritual health represented by the kalash and prevention by understating the knowledge of true self by reading the Ayurveda.

These spiritual powers are the ones, which one can attain while doing basic and advanced meditation and includes the capacity to fulfill desires, to give boons to others, to acquire health, wealth etc. Meditation is not possible in case of a person who is mentally or physically sick or whose gross body is not fit for receiving meditation benefits.

Lord Vishnu in the form of Mohini stands for ‘delusion of the mind’ in the form of pride. It is the pride of achievement to which the Asuras or the demons succumbed and thus, lost their right to enter into the world of immortality. Pride and egoism are the final hurdles one has to overcome in spiritual life before being able to experience self-realization.

Diagnosis of hypertension in childhood requires repeated BP measurements

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The presence of hypertension should be confirmed on the basis of three blood pressure measurements at separate clinical visits.

Normative BP percentiles are based upon data on gender, age, height, and blood pressure measurements from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and other population–based studies.

In a study, initial BP measurement was normal (below the 90th percentile), pre–hypertensive (systolic or diastolic BP between the 90th or 95th percentile) and hypertensive (systolic or diastolic BP ≥95th percentile) in 82, 13, and 5 percent of children.

At follow–up, subsequent hypertensive measurements were observed in only 4 percent of the 10,848 children who had initial hypertensive values. In the cohort, the overall prevalence of hypertension was 0.3 percent.

Source: Lo JC, Sinaiko A, Chandra M, et al. Prehypertension and hypertension in community–based pediatric practice. Pediatrics 2013;131:e415.

Spiritual Prescriptions: Satsang

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Satsang is a common household word and is often held in many residential colonies. Traditionally, Satsang meant the regular meeting of a group of elderly or women of an area with a common intention of attaining inner happiness or peace through Bhajans or devotional songs for a particular God or Gods.  In Satsang, people realize that it is the Self, communing with Self.

The Sanskrit word ‘Satsang’ literally means gathering together for guidance, mutual support or in search of truth. It may involve talking together, eating together, working together, listening together or praying together.

Most scriptures describe sat and asat. They discriminate that this world is maya (asat) and God is Divine. Furthermore, they state that maya is not yours; Divine is yours.

Sang means to join, not just coming close, but to join. And how do you join? Only with love, which acts as the glue. So Satsang is:  Sat—Divine. Sang—loving association.

In non-traditional Satsang, people verbally express themselves to others in an uninhibited way. Here, each participant talks free of judgment of others, and self. In this way, each person is able to see many viewpoints, which may serve to diminish the rigidity of their own.

Satsang is one way of acquiring spiritual well-being. Many scientific studies have shown that when mediation or chanting is done in groups it has more benefits than when done individually. Maharishi Mahesh Yogi once said that if 1% of the population meditates or chants together it will have a positive influence on the entire society.

Satsang also helps in creating a network of people with different unique talents. Satsangi groups are often considered in a very deep-rooted friendship.

Adi Shankaracharya in his book Bhaja Govindam also talks about satsang in combination with sewa and simran and says that together the three can make one acquire spiritual well– being. Nirankaris and Sikhs also give importance to satsang and in fact every true Sikh is supposed to participate in the Gurudwara on a regular basis.

Chanting of mantra or listening to discourses in a satsang helps to understand spirituality through gyan marga. Group chanting continued on a regular basis is one of the ways of meditation mentioned in the shastras. It shifts consciousness from sympathetic to the parasympathetic mode.

The medical educational programs of doctors of today can be called medical satsangs as whatever is discussed is for the welfare of the society.

Satsang also inculcates in us, one of the laws of Ganesha, the law of big ears, which teaches everyone to have the patience to listen to the others.
In satsang, nobody is small or big, everybody has a right to discuss or give his or her views. Over a period of time, most people who regularly attend satsang, start working from the level of their spirit and not the ego.

Dr KK Aggarwal Nominates Nine Renowned Doctors to Join the Swachch Bharat Campaign

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The team of nine leading doctors in the city led by Delhi BPJ President, Mr Satish Upadhyay and Heart Care Foundation of India’s President Dr KK Aggarwal together pledged– “Hum Shapath lete hain ki hum Bharat to Swachh or Samridh Banayenge”. In addition to this they also took brooms in their hands and participated in a symbolic cleanliness drive at the Talkatora Indoor Stadium.

The tem of nine medical icons nominated by Dr KK Aggarwal included Dr Naresh Trehan – CMD Medanta The Medicity; Dr Anupam Sibbal –Group Medical Director, Apollo Hospital; Dr Naveen Dang – Director Dr Dangs Path Lab; Dr D K Dewan – Director Dept of family welfare, Delhi Government ; Dr P K Sharma – MOH, NDMC; Dr O P Yadava – CMD National Heart Institute; Dr Anil Goyal:  President Delhi Medical Association ; Dr Girish Tyagi – Registrar Delhi Medical Council and Dr Vinay Aggarwal  – Former President IMA.

Commenting on the campaign, Dr Naresh Trehan, CMD of Medanta – The Medcity said that I am privileged to be nominated to be a part of the 9 Medical Navratnas of the Swachch Bharat campaign and I am convinced that by keeping our surroundings clean, we can make India a healthier and disease free nation.

Speaking at the valedictory ceremony, Padma Shri Awardee, Sr. National VP and Secretary General Elect – IMA and President – Heart Care Foundation of India, Dr KK Aggarwal said,“ Improper sanitation, unhygienic habits, un kept surroundings, improper disposal of waste and open defecation all drastically increase the prevalence of disease in our country. It has been Heart Care Foundation of India’s constant endeavor over the past 21 years through the Perfect Health Mela to raise awareness about preventive health and this year we decided to add cleanliness to it given their indispensible relationship. I would like to thank all the doctors present here today, participants, sponsors and supporters for the wholehearted efforts and contribution in making Mela a success”

Started in 1991, Perfect Health Mela is a mass health awareness module, which attracts over 2-3 lakh people each year. In its 21st edition, the Mela was organized in association the MTNL. SAIL, NDMC, MCD, UN Information Center for Bhutan and Nepal and DST and the theme was “Swach Baharat, Swasth Bharat”. The main philosophy behind this theme being that by improving the cleanliness of the country several leading diseases such as dengue, typhoid, malaria, Jaundice and cholera can be eliminated.

Some of the key one of its kind features of this year’s event included a live telemedicine facility set up by Medanta – the Medicity, the SAIL Heart and Health Pavilion and subsidized heart surgeries provided by the Sameer Malik Heart Care Foundation Fund.

Commenting on his nomination, the Group Medical Director of Apollo Hospitals, Dr Anupam Sibbal, added, “A country can only truly progress if its citizens are healthy and environment is clean. I thank Dr KK Aggarwal for nominating me and hope I can help carry forward this message. I congratulate him and his team at Heart Care Foundation of India for their constant efforts towards raising health awareness and providing effective health solutions for the marginalized sections of the society.”

Over 1000 people attended the valedictory function of the 21st MTNL Perfect Health Mela & SAIL Health Pavilion.

 

Gaining Weight Losing Strength versus Losing Weight Gaining Strength

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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When we gain weight, we must acquire more strength and when we lose weight, we must lose the strength. This is a fundamental medical principle.

If we gain weight and feel week, it is a disease and when we lose weight and gain strength, we are recovering from the disease. One is not supposed to gain more than 5kg of weight after the age of 20 years. Any weight gain after that will only be due to accumulation of fat which leads to insulin resistance.

Insulin resistance does not allow food to convert into energy. In the state of insulin resistance, whatever you eat, it is converted into fat. As it is not converted into energy and you feel week. When you reduce insulin resistance by drugs or walking, metabolism becomes normal and whatever you eat gets converted into energy and you start gaining strength.

Never Hurt Ego of a Person

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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It is a well known Vedic fact that if you hurt ego of a person, he will never forgive you, especially, if you have insulted or implicated him in character assassination, cast implications, financial embezzlement or in public, you call a woman as old or a man as impotent.

For example, if I hurt ego of a chowkidaar, next time if a patient comes to the hospital gate and asks where Dr. KK Aggarwal is, he only has to whispery, “which Aggarwal, whose cases never survive?”

Also never hurt the ego of a person who is drunk. Under the influence of alcohol, a person loses his capacity to judge persons and situations. If you provoke him, he can be destructive and aggressive.

Duration of CPR may be a factor in kids’ survival

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Duration of CPR may be a factor in kids’ survival

Some children with in-hospital cardiac arrest can benefit from longer duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), a study has found. In the study among survivors, neurological outcome was favorable for the majority of patients.

Of the 3,419 children included in the study, 28% survived to hospital discharge, and 16.6% of these survivors had CPR longer than 35 minutes, according to Renée Matos, MD, MPH, of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and colleagues. A total of 60% of these survivors with longer-duration CPR achieved a favorable neurologic outcome, they reported in the study published in Circulation, journal of the American Heart Association.

In the mid–1990s, authorities considered pediatric CPR futile beyond 20 minutes’ duration or when more than two doses of epinephrine were provided.

Even though longer–duration CPR can benefit some children, the reality is that after the first 15 minutes of CPR, survival rate declines rapidly. Survival decreased by 2.1% for every minute of chest compressions over 15 minutes.

When CPR was longer than 35 minutes, those in the Surgical Cardiac category had the best survival to hospital discharge rate (25%), followed by, Medical Cardiac –21%; General Surgical– 13%; General Medical – 10% and Trauma– 8%.  ([Medpage today)