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Dr K K Aggarwal

Dark Chocolate good for the heart

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Dark chocolate is thought to promote relaxed arteries, also have biochemical effects that may discourage atherosclerosis suggests a report published in the March 2014 issue of the FASEB Journal.

In a randomized, double–blind study, eating dark chocolate—acutely and over weeks—not only improved objective measures of endovascular function, it also improved biochemical markers that reflect leukocyte activation, inflammation, and other signs of atherogenesis.

Changes in endothelial function were reflected in improved flow–mediated dilation (FMD), blood pressure, and augmentation index, while “changes in leukocyte–cell counts, plasma cytokines, and leukocyte adherence markers after chocolate consumption point toward a less–activated state of cellular adherence and, hence, a less atherogenic milieu, according to the authors, led by Dr Diederik Esser (Top Institute Food and Nutrition and Wageningen University, The Netherlands).

Why is there a ritual or tradition of offering food to God before eating?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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This is a Vedic reminder to oneself that one should eat only those foods that are offered to God. Each time you offer food to God, it is a reminder to you to change your decision and choices. For example, alcohol, tobacco, onion, garlic, radish, etc. are not offered to God. If they are part of your food, there are chances that you will not consume these food items, if you observe this ritual.

Over a period of time people have stopped following this ritual and now eat some foods, which cannot be offered to God in all their 21 meals during a week. This is the reason why the incidence of lifestyle diseases is increasing in the community.

Shoe Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Avoid poorly fitting shoes.

• Diabetic patients should avoid walking bare feet.

• Shoes that are too tight can cause pressure ulcers.

• High heels are okay for occasions but if you wear them all the time, significant foot pain and other problems can develop ranging from bunions, corns and calluses to more complex problems like misshapen hammer toes or worsening excruciating pain in the ball of the foot.

• Whenever you wear shoes that are tight, they will cause foot pain.

• Whenever you wear shoes that constrict the natural shape of the foot, they are bound to cause foot pain.

• Women, who regularly wear high heels, walk with shorter, more forceful strides and require more muscles to walk.

• Shoes can be classified under following three categories: o Good shoes or low risk shoes: athletic and casual sneakers. o Average mid risk shoes: hard or rubber–soled shoes – special shoes and work boots. o Poor or high risk shoes are the ones that do not have support or structure such as high heels, sandals, sleepers.

• Pointed toed shoes are equally bad as they disrupt the natural shape of the feet.

• If you love to wear heels, then choose heels that are not higher than 2″ and are wide.

• It is always better to buy shoes in the evening as the foot swells up by evening. If you buy them in the morning, the shoes may feel tight in evening hours.

• Always try both shoes as one foot may be smaller or larger than the other one in some people.

• Always wear the shoes that are wider than your foot.

• The actual size of the shoe may vary between different manufactures.

• The selected shoe should be wider than broadest part of the foot.

• Your foot tends to become longer and wider as you age, always check the size of your shoes every two years.

• Narrow shoes with heels should only be used for a function, dinner or a formal party, specially a party where you do not have to stand for a longer time.

Vedic principles behind cognitive behavior therapy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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1) What is counseling? A: The mental process involves generation of a thought or idea, which is analyzed and then acted upon. Thought, analysis and action therefore are the primary three processes of human mind. Counseling involves actions at all three levels.

2) What are different types of counseling? A: Counseling involves basically two principles – Cognitive counseling and behavioral counseling. Behavioral, when the concentration is only on the actions and cognitive, when the concentration is on the changes in either the thought process or in the interpretation of the thought process.

3) What is cognitive behavior therapy? A: As against a pure behavior therapy where a person is counseled to do pre–defined things on regular intervals, cognitive behavior therapy involves changing the actions by changing observations of the interpretation of a particular situation.

4) What is the origin of counseling in India? A: The origin of counseling goes back to Vedic era. Upanishads were basically text books on counseling based on the original knowledge of Rigveda, Yajurveda, Samveda and Atharvaveda.

5) Is there a relationship of Bhagavad Gita with Counseling? A: Bhagavad Gita is counseling done by Krishna to resolve the conflict in Arjuna’s mind whether to fight or not. At that time there were no doctors and hence counseling was done by the elders in the family.

6) Are the principles of Bhagavad Gita followed today? A: All the principles of cognitive behavior therapy today are basically principles that have originated from Bhagavad Gita.

7) What is the first principle? A: The first principle is that “counseling cannot be done in 1 or 2 sessions.” It requires up to 18 sessions which is what Krishna did in Bhagavad Gita. Bhagavad Gita contains 702 dialogues in the form of Shlokas. Therefore, a proper counseling involves in–depth conversation between the counselor and the patient.

8) What is the second principle of counseling? A: The second principle of counseling is to listen to the patient in the first session in great detail and this is what Krishna did in Bhagavad Gita. In Chapter 1, only Arjuna speaks and Krishna does not utter a word. A patient listening is half the healing done.

9) What is the third principle? A: As per the third principle, the second (first interactive) session between counselor and the patient should be the longest one. Chapter 2 of Bhagavad Gita is the gist of Krishna’s counseling.

10) What is the fourth principle? A: The fourth principle is that after giving a detailed counseling in the second session, it is expected that the patient will be confused. This is what happens in start of Chapter 3 where Arjuna says to Krishna “I am confused. Sometimes you are talking about one path and other time you are talking about another path. Guide me again.” The third counseling session therefore, is the most important where one has to counsel slowly and in great detail.

11) What is the fifth principle? A: The next principle is to give reasoning to the counseling. One should not take the patient for granted. Krishna discusses each and every aspect of life with Arjuna in great detail giving scientific reasoning at every stage.

12) What is the sixth principle? A: Reassure the patient again and again. During his counseling, Krishna assures Arjuna on multiple occasions that you do your job and do not worry. I am with you.

13) What is the seventh principle? A: The seventh principle involves creating some fear in the patient’s mind. This is what Krishna does while showing his virat swaroop. This especially works in patients of addiction. Some degree of fear with re–assurance from the counselor always works.

14) What is the eight principle? A: The summing up counseling session should be as long as the second session. The Chapter 18 of Bhagavad Gita is as big as Chapter 2 where the whole Bhagavad Gita is summarized again.

15) What are the ingredients of counseling? A: Counseling basically involves in-depth knowledge of dharma, artha, kama and moksha. They are greatly described in Dharmashastra, Arthashastra, Kamasutra and Upanishads through various Vedas.

16) What is stress? A: Stress is the reaction of the body or the mind to the interpretation of any situation.

17) How can stress be managed? A: Stress can be managed by either changing the response of the body through yogic living, or changing the interpretation by understanding the principles of counseling or change the reaction by willful actions. 18) Are different nitis of our scriptures based on counseling? A: Yes. Vidur Niti was the counseling given by Vidur to Dhritarashtra when he was not sleeping and Chanakya Niti was based on how to rule a country. Yoga Vashishtha was the counseling given by Vashishtha to Rama to acquire higher levels of spiritual knowledge.

Cherries May Prevent Gout Flares

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Gout Patients are less likely to report acute attacks after 2 days of eating cherries or imbibing cherry extract than during periods after no cherry intake, according to data reported in Arthritis & Rheumatism by Yuqing Zhang, DSci, and colleagues from Boston University School of Medicine in Massachusetts.

Cherry intake during a 2-day period is associated with a 35% lower risk for gout attacks and that cherry extract intake with a 45% lower risk. Risk for gout attacks was reduced by 75% when cherry intake was combined with allopurinol use. If the study subjects took allopurinol alone, it reduced the risk of gout attack by 53%; if subjects took cherry alone, it reduced the risk by 32%; if they took both, the risk of gout attack was reduced by 75%, reports Medscape.

A cherry serving was defined as one-half cup or 10 to 12 cherries. Cherries may decrease serum uric acid levels by increasing glomerular filtration or reducing tubular reabsorption. Cherries and cherry extract contain high levels of anthocyanins, which possess anti-inflammatory properties.

Is the origin of ISO Certification from the Vedas?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Whatever you say or do means you are ISO certified. Whatever you say or do means you are ISO certified In mythology, truthfulness means that you do what you think or say. ISO therefore is a Vedic stamp for truthfulness. You need ISO certification in Kalyug as majority being Kalyugis will not be doing what they say or think.

In traditional old business times, transactions were done on verbal assurances but today every one works on written agreements. “Prana Jaye per vachan na jaye” was a very common saying in those times.

Very low–calorie diet mimics benefits of bariatric surgery

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Marked improvement in blood sugar control occurs in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus shortly after Roux–en–Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) and before there is major weight loss.

A study determined whether the magnitude of this change is primarily due to caloric restriction or is unique to the surgical procedure. Eleven hospitalized subjects who underwent RYGB and 14 subjects mean–matched for BMI, HbA1c, and diabetes duration were given a very low–calorie diet of 500 kcal/day with a macronutrient content similar to that consumed by patients after RYGB.

Frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed before and after interventions.

Both groups lost an equivalent amount of weight over a mean study period of 21 days. Insulin sensitivity, acute insulin secretion after intravenous glucose administration, and β–cell function as determined by disposition index improved to a similar extent in both groups.

Likewise, changes in fasting glucose and fructosamine levels were similar. Based on these data, VLCD improves insulin sensitivity and β–cell function just as well as RYGB in the short term.


Consciousness

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Energy is the raw material of the universe.

• Information is the organization of energy into reproducible patterns.

• Consciousness is living information and energy (living energized information)

• Consciousness is, therefore, intelligence.

• Intelligence is information and energy that has self–referral or the ability to learn through experiences and the ability to re-interpret and influence one’s own information and energy states.

• Consciousness is live, advanced, software–driven energized information. A close example: Advanced computer software which can type, correct, interpret, edit and store spoken or read information.

Heart Attack Symptoms in Women and elderly are different

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Chest pain is still the most common sign of a heart attack for most women but women are more likely than men to have symptoms other than chest pain or discomfort when experiencing a heart pain. In a study published in Archives of Internal Medicine researchers examined 35 years of data that yielded 69 studies and found that, between 30 and 37 percent of women did not have chest discomfort during a heart attack. While, 17 to 27 percent of men did not experience chest discomfort.

• Older people are also more likely to have heart attack without chest discomfort. Absence of chest discomfort is a strong predictor for missed diagnosis and treatment delays.

• Women are also more likely than men to experience other forms of cardiac chest pain syndromes, such as unstable angina, and they appear to report a wider range of symptoms associated with acute coronary syndrome. They are more likely to report pain in the middle or upper back, neck, or jaw; shortness of breath; nausea or vomiting; indigestion; loss of appetite; weakness or fatigue; cough; dizziness; and palpitations.

• On an average, women are nearly a decade older than men at the time of their initial heart attack.

Soul does not leave the body immediately after death

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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According to Prashna Upanishad, at the time of death, the Prana Vayu (life force and respiration) merges with Udana Vayu (brain stem reflexes) and leaves the body.

But this does not happen immediately after clinical death defined as stoppage of heart and respiration. Medically, the term used for clinically dead patients is sudden cardiac arrest.

As per the modern medicine, in cardiac arrest, the brain does not die for the next 10 minutes and during this period, if the heart can be revived, life can be brought back.

The revival of patient during this period can be remembered by the formula of 10 which is that within 10 minutes of the stoppage of heart (cardiac arrest), if effective chest compressions are given for the next 10 minutes with a speed of 100 per minutes (10X10), 80% of the cardiac arrest victims can be revived.

This period can be much longer in hypothermia state. If the temperature of the body is low, the soul does not leave the body till the temperature is brought back to normal. Today, this property of soul is also used as therapeutic measure where patients who cannot be revived in the first 10 minutes of clinical death are put in a freezing chamber and artificial hypothermia is produced and these patients can then be transported to an advance cardiac centre where even after 24 hours resuscitation measure can be applied after re-warming the body. Many people have been revived even after 24 hours of cardiac arrest with such a technology.

There are instances in literature where a newborn with hypothermia was declared dead and got revived in the cremation ground when the heat of the atmosphere brought his temperature to normal and the pressure of the wood worked like cardiac massage.

This aspect of “life after death” is a contribution of the modern science to the Vedic science. Though in Vedic literature, it was well known phenomenon as Savitri brought life back into Satyavan even after his clinical death.

The take home message is that one should not declare a patient dead in the first 10 minutes; give cardiac massage and try reviving him with hands-only compression CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation).






Preventing a Peptic Ulcer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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An ulcer is a breakdown in the lining of the stomach or the first part of the small intestine. A type of bacterial infection (Helicobacter pylori) is the most frequent cause, but lifestyle factors may also raise the risk. The following preventive steps may ward off a peptic ulcer:

• Limit alcohol to no more than two drinks daily.

• Stop smoking or chewing tobacco.

• If you need to take painkillers, avoid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as naproxen, ibuprofen or aspirin.

• Consider, with your doctor’s approval, paracetamol instead.

Five types of people from Nastik to Astik

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Following are the five types of people:

• Nastik: Those who do not believe in God.

• Astik: For whom God exists.

• Those for believe that God also exists in them (I and the God are the same)

• Tat Tvam Asi (God not only exists in me but also in you)

• God is in everybody

People who believe that God exists are fearful people and they always fear God. People who see God in themselves, live a disciplined Satvik life and do not indulge in activities that are not God-friendly. People who believe that God is not only in them but also in you, treat every person the same way as they treat themselves. People for whom God is everywhere always work for the welfare of the society.


High fat diet, prostate cancer prone

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Diets high in saturated fats increase the risk of prostate cancer. As per a report from University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston published in the International Journal of Cancer, men who consume high saturated animal fat diet are two times more likely to experience disease progression after prostate cancer surgery than men with lower saturated fat intake. The “disease–free” survival time was also shorter among obese men who eat high saturated fat diet than non–obese men consuming diets low in saturated fat. Non–obese men with high intake and obese men with low intake had “disease–free” survival of 29 and 42 months, respectively. Men with a high saturated fat intake had the shortest survival time free of prostate cancer (19 months). Non–obese men with low fat intake survived the longest time free of the disease (46 months).

Take home messages

• High saturated fat diet has been linked to cancer of the prostate

• Reducing saturated fat in the diet after prostate cancer surgery can help reduce the cancer progression.

• Cancer prostate has the same risk factors as that of heart blockages and both are linked to high saturated fat intake.

• With an increase in number of heart patients, a corresponding increase in prostate cancer patients is also seen in the society.

Think positive and think different

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The Mantra to acquire spiritual health is to think positive and differently. Positive thinking produces positive hormones and takes you from sympathetic mode to parasympathetic mode. When you think different, it gives you several opportunities and from multiple options available, you can ask your heart to choose one of them.

Thinking positive was a message given by Lord Buddha and thinking different by Adi Shankaracharya.

The candle light march, which was held to fight for justice in the Jessica Lal murder case, has been picked up by most of the protest campaigns because it was positive and different.

I have seen three examples in my life where I used this and prolonged the life of those persons.

My grandfather–in–law, at the age of 85, thought it was time to go but when we made him work positively and differently, he died at the age of 100 years. He was asked to teach youngsters law, write to Prime Minister everyday on certain issues and find matrimonial matches for the youngest persons in the family.

In other two cases, one was suffering from terminal prostate cancer and the other had terminal brain cancer. The first one lived for 10 years and the other is still alive. Both were told that they had a very early cancer and that was cured by a surgery.

When you think different, it creates creativity and when it is with positive attitude, it is accepted by all.


How to recognize cardiac arrest

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Rapid recognition of cardiac arrest is the essential first step of successful CPR 10.

As per Guidelines, the lay rescuer who witnesses a person collapse or comes across an apparently unresponsive person should confirm unresponsiveness by tapping the person on the shoulder and shouting: “Are you all right?”

If the person does not respond, the rescuer calls for help or ambulance and initiates excellent chest compressions.

Lay rescuers should not attempt to assess the victim’s pulse and, unless the patient has what appear to be normal respirations, should assume the patient is apneic or without respiration.

Remember even well–trained professionals can have difficulty determining if breathing is adequate or pulses are present in unresponsive adults.

After assessing responsiveness, health care providers should quickly check the patient’s pulse.

While doing so, it is reasonable to visually assess the patient’s respirations.

It is appropriate to assume the patient is in cardiac arrest if there is no breathing or abnormal breathing (gasping) or if a pulse cannot be readily palpated within 10 seconds.

The key point is not to delay CPR.