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Dr K K Aggarwal

Working hard when tired not good for the health

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Doing mental or physical work while exhausted may harm your health, according to a study from University of Alabama at Birmingham and published in International Journal of Psychophysiology.

In the study, fatigued people had bigger spikes in blood pressure compared to well–rested people while doing a memorization test. When fatigued people regard a task as worthwhile and achievable, they increase their effort to compensate for their diminished capability. As a result, the blood pressure of a tired person increases and remains elevated until the task is completed or the person gives up. In this study, the researchers told 80 volunteers that they could win a modest prize by memorizing 2 to 6 nonsense trigrams (meaningless, three–letter sequences) within two minutes. Compared to volunteers with low levels of fatigue, those with moderate fatigue had stronger blood pressure while doing the two–trigram memorization task.


Eating Out Tips

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Curb portions: Always order for one if you are two people and if you are alone set aside some of what is on your plate to bring home.

• Resist refined carbohydrates.

• Load your plate with colorful choices at the salad bar with vegetables, fruits and small amounts of lean protein. Skip the creamy dressings.

• Choose dishes that are grilled, roasted, steamed, or sautéed.

• Don’t be afraid to request a salad, vegetables, or fruit instead of starchy side dishes.

• If you are a non–vegetarian, order only fish or seafood.

• If you decide to have dessert, share it with your dining companion(s).

Do we get a human birth each time we die?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As per Vedic sciences, Hindu philosophy believes in rebirth unless your Sanchit and Prarabdha Karmas are totally exhausted. It also believes in liberation wherein once your past karmas debt is over, you do not take a rebirth.

On the other hand, Garuda Purana says that you can take rebirth in animal species, which means you can be born like a donkey or a dog. Vedic science, on the other hand, says that once you get a human body, you will either be liberated or only get another human body.

The message of Garuda Purana can be read and interpreted in a different perspective. In mythology, humans have been linked to animal tendencies. For example, bull is linked to sexual and non–sexual desires, peacock to vanity etc. Probably, people who wrote Garuda Purana meant that if you do not live according to the Shastras, you will end up getting another human body but with animal tendencies and behavior.


Be Positive, Be Different and Be Persistent

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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You should be not only positive, different but also persistent. In ten incarnations of Lord Vishnu, the first is a fish, which indicates to be different in life. The second incarnation is the tortoise, which indicates that you should be different but learn to withdraw when the need arises. The third is a boar which indicates persistence.

The mantra of a successful life is to be positively different and persistent and yet learn to withdraw when the situation arises.

 


Top 10 Ways to Keep the Kidneys Healthy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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1. Monitor blood pressure and cholesterol.

2. Control weight.

3. Don’t overuse over–the–counter painkillers.

4. Monitor blood glucose.

5. Get an annual physical exam. 6. Know if chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes or heart disease runs in your family. If so, you may be at risk.

7. Don’t smoke.

8. Exercise regularly.

9. Follow a healthy diet.

10. Get tested for chronic kidney disease if you’re at risk.

What are the two basic truths of Vedanta?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Two Hindu principles that symbolize the outcome of freedom of thought were conceptualized some 4000 years back by unnamed rishis in Rig–Veda which say, “This world is one family” (Vasudaiva Kutumbakam) and that “The Universal Reality is the same, but different people can call it by different names” (Ekam Sat Viprah Bahuda Vadanti).

In these two statements made in ancient Hindu India, we see the seeds of globalization and freedom of thought.

Most religions teach belief in one God. Judaism, Christianity and Islam are, in fact, Semitic religions essentially speaking of One God. Even Hinduism that talks of many gods, in its highest form speaks only of One God.

This was defined in the Sanskrit verse in the Rig Veda: Ekam Sat Vipra Bahuda Vadanti (The Truth is One, but scholars call it by many names).

“Vasudaiva Kutumbakam” defines that you and me are not different from each other and we are the part of the same web of life. The same spirit is shared by you and me and we are just the two sides of the same coin. And hence, it adds on to say, how can there be any conflict between us?

The truth is one, but is perceived differently because different people are at different levels of evolution in spiritual terms. Everybody perceives it with their level of understanding and perception. For an uneducated village society, even an entry of intelligent person in the village will be perceived as of GOD.

Vedanta upholds the reality of this indivisible, immanent and transcendent truth called Spirit. Vedanta denotes one’s identity with the rest of humanity. According to it, there is no stranger in this world. Everyone is related to one another in the kinship of the Spirit. In Vedanta, there is no ‘I’ and ‘for me’, but is ‘ours’ and ‘for us’; and ultimately ‘His’ and ‘for Him’.

If the Vedanta philosophy is rightly followed upon, it will obliterate all evils. It is the science of right living and it is not the sole monopoly of the Hindus. It is for all and it has no quarrel with any religion. It preaches universal principles and Vedanta is the only universal, and eternal religion. It is a great leveler and it unites all, giving room to all.



FODMAPS free diet

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Symptoms of IBS and inflammatory bowel disease may be at least in part related to impaired absorption of carbohydrates. Fermentable oligo–, di– and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) in patients with IBS or IBD may enter the distal small bowel and colon where they are fermented, leading to symptoms and increased intestinal permeability (and possibly inflammation).

Examples of FODMAPs include:

• Fructans or inulins (wheat, onions, garlic, and artichokes)

• Galactans (beans, lentils, legumes, cabbage, and Brussels’ sprouts)

• Lactose (dairy)

• Fructose (fruits, honey, high fructose corn syrup)

• Sorbitol

• Xylitol

• Mannitol

• Polyols (sweeteners containing sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, maltitol, stone fruits such as avocado, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, plums)

Avoidance of carbohydrates has been a long–popularized non–pharmacologic approach to reducing symptoms in IBS (and possibly modifying disease in IBD).

Preventing heat disorders

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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During summer, susceptible children and adolescents can develop heat stroke, which can even lead to death if not identified and treated in time.

• Heat index is more important than the atmospheric temperature. A 42 degree temperature may feel like 46 degrees if the heat index is high.

• Avoid prolonged exposure to sun when the temperature is high. Use an umbrella if you need to go out.

• Wear light cotton clothes to avoid heat absorption.

• Make sure that you are properly hydrated before you step out in the heat. The requirement of water in summer is 500 ml more than that in winter.

• Summer drinks should be refreshing and cool such as panna, khas khas, rose petal water, lemon water, bel sharbat and sattu sharbat.

• Any drink with more than 10% sugar becomes a soft drink and so should be avoided. Ideally, the percentage of sugar, jaggery or khand should be 3%, which is the percentage present in oral rehydration drink.

• You should pass urine at least once in 8 hours. This is a sign of adequate hydration.

• If you develop heat cramps, drink plenty of lemon water with sugar and salt.

• Heat exertion presents with fever and sweating. If you develop heat exertion, drink plenty of oral fluids, mixed with water, lemon and sugar. Presence of sweating is good sign.

• If a person develops high grade fever, i.e. more than 104 degrees Fahrenheit with dry armpits, this is a sign of impending heat stroke, which is a medical emergency. The temperature here may be more than 106 degree Fahrenheit. Fever should be brought down rapidly within minutes to save the life.

• People, who have been advised to restrict their fluid intake on medical grounds, should discuss their fluid requirement in summer with their doctor.

Ganesha, the Stress Management Guru

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If Lord Krishna was the first counselor who taught the principles of counseling, Lord Ganesha taught us the principles of stress management.

We should worship Lord Ganesha and become like him whenever we face any difficulty or are stressed out.

The elephant head of Lord Ganesha symbolizes that when in difficulty, use your wisdom, intelligence and think differently. It can be equated to the Third Eye of Lord Shiva. Elephant is supposed to be the most intelligent animal in the kingdom. Here, wisdom means to think before speaking. Lord Buddha also said that don’t speak unless it is necessary and is truthful and kind.

The big elephant ears of Lord Ganesha signify listening to everybody when in difficulty. Elephant ears are known to hear long distances. Elephant eye see a long distance and in terms of mythology, it denotes acquiring the quality of foreseeing when in difficulty. The mouth of Lord Ganesha represents speaking less and hearing and listening more.

The big tummy of Lord Ganesha represents digesting any information gathered by listening to people in difficulty. The trunk denotes using the power of discrimination to decide from the retained information. It also indicates doing both smaller and bigger things by yourself. The elephant trunk can pick up a needle as well as a tree.

The teeth, broken and unbroken, signify to be in a state of balance in loss and gain. This implies that one should not get upset if the task is not accomplished and also not get excited if the task is accomplished. In times of difficulty, Ganesha also teaches us not to lose strength and control one’s attachments, desires and greed.

The four arms of Lord Ganesha represent strength. Ropes in two hands indicate attachment; Laddoo or Sweet in one hand represents desires and mouse represents greed. Riding over the mouse indicates controlling one’s greed.

Lord Ganesha is worshipped either when a new work is initiated or when one finds it difficult to complete a job or work. In these two situations, these principles of Lord Ganesha need to be inculcated in one’s habits.

 



Five Types of People from Nastik to Astik

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Following are the five types of people

1. Nastik – the one who does not believe in God.

2. Astik – for whom God exists.

3. Those who see God in themselves (I and the God are the same) 4. Tatvamasi (God not only exists in me but also in you)

5. God is in everybody

People who believe that God exists are fearful people and they always fear God. People who see God in themselves, live a disciplined Satvik life and do not indulge in activities which are not God-friendly.

People who believe that God is not only in me but you also, treat every person the same way as they treat themselves.

People for whom God is everywhere, always work for the welfare of the society.

 

 



Tips to prevent Dengue and Malaria

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Both malaria and dengue mosquitoes bite during day time.

• It is the female mosquito which bites.

• Dengue mosquito takes three meals in a day while malaria mosquito takes one meal in three days.

• Malaria may infect only one person in the family but dengue will invariably infect multiple members in the family in the same day.

• Malaria fever often presents with chills and rigors. Suspect Chikungunya if the fever presents together with joint and muscle pains.

• Both dengue and malaria mosquitoes grow in fresh water collected in the house.

• The filaria mosquito grows in dirty water.

• There should be no collections of water inside the house for more than a week.

• Mosquito cycle takes 7-12 days to complete. So, if any utensil or container that stores water is scrubbed cleaned properly once in a week, there are no chances of mosquito breeding.

• Mosquitoes can lay eggs in flower pots or in water tanks on the terrace if they are not properly covered.

• If the water pots for birds kept on terraces are not cleaned every week, then mosquitoes can lay eggs in them.

• Some mosquitoes can lay eggs in broken tires, broken glasses or any container where water can stay for a week.

• Using mosquito nets/repellents in the night may not prevent malaria and dengue because these mosquitoes bite during the day time.

• Wearing full sleeves shirt and trousers can prevent mosquito bites.

• Mosquito repellent can be of help.

• If you suspect that you have a fever, which can be malaria or dengue, immediately report to the doctor.

• There are no vaccines for malaria and dengue.

Ganesha, the Stress Management Guru

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If Lord Krishna was the first counselor who taught the principles of counseling, Lord Ganesha taught us the principles of stress management.

We should worship Lord Ganesha and become like him whenever we face any difficulty or are stressed out.

The elephant head of Lord Ganesha symbolizes that when in difficulty, use your wisdom, intelligence and think differently. It can be equated to the Third Eye of Lord Shiva. Elephant is supposed to be the most intelligent animal in the kingdom. Here, wisdom means to think before speaking. Lord Buddha also said that don’t speak unless it is necessary and is truthful and kind.

The big elephant ears of Lord Ganesha signify listening to everybody when in difficulty. Elephant ears are known to hear long distances. Elephant eye see a long distance and in terms of mythology, it denotes acquiring the quality of foreseeing when in difficulty. The mouth of Lord Ganesha represents speaking less and hearing and listening more.

The big tummy of Lord Ganesha represents digesting any information gathered by listening to people in difficulty. The trunk denotes using the power of discrimination to decide from the retained information. It also indicates doing both smaller and bigger things by yourself. The elephant trunk can pick up a needle as well as a tree.

The teeth, broken and unbroken, signify to be in a state of balance in loss and gain. This implies that one should not get upset if the task is not accomplished and also not get excited if the task is accomplished. In times of difficulty, Ganesha also teaches us not to lose strength and control one’s attachments, desires and greed.

The four arms of Lord Ganesha represent strength. Ropes in two hands indicate attachment; Laddoo or Sweet in one hand represents desires and mouse represents greed. Riding over the mouse indicates controlling one’s greed.

Lord Ganesha is worshipped either when a new work is initiated or when one finds it difficult to complete a job or work. In these two situations, these principles of Lord Ganesha need to be inculcated in one’s habits.

 




Sleep deprivation and sleep apnea both bad for the heart

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Both sleep deprivation and sleep apnea have been linked to a higher risk of heart disease.

Short–term sleep deprivation is linked with high cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high blood pressure. Sleep apnea makes people temporarily stop breathing many times during the night. Up to 83% of people with heart disease also have sleep apnea.

In sleep apnea oxygen levels dip and the brain sends an urgent “Breathe now!” signal. That signal briefly wakes the sleeper and makes him or her gasp for air. That signal also jolts the same stress hormone and nerve pathways that are stimulated when you are angry or frightened. As a result, the heart beats faster and blood pressure rises — along with other things that can threaten heart health such as inflammation and an increase in blood clotting ability. (Source Harvard)

Should doctors smile while talking to their patients?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Bhagavad Gita 2.10: tam uva ca hṛṣīkeśaḥ, prahasann iva bhārata, senayor ubhayor madhye, viṣīdantam idaḿ vacaḥ SYNONYMS: tam — unto him; uvāca — said; hṛṣīkeśaḥ — the master of the senses, Kṛṣṇa; prahasan — smiling; iva — like that; bhārata — O Dhṛtarāṣṭra, descendant of Bharata; senayoḥ — of the armies; ubhayoḥ — of both parties; madhye — between; viṣīdantam — unto the lamenting one; idam — the following; vacaḥ — words.

TRANSLATION: O descendant of Bharata, at that time Krishna, smiling, in the midst of both the armies, spoke the following words to the grief-stricken Arjuna. The answer comes in Bhagavad Gita, the first text book of counseling. When grief-ridden Arjuna approaches him, he starts his counseling in happy and smiling mood. Arjuna was grief-filled, sad and rebellious. Yet Krishna smiled.

The word in the Gita is prahasann, which means to smile before laughing (beginning to laugh). It was not a weak or full smile or a sarcastic grimace, but a very positive smile.

The grief of a patient halves if he sees his doctor smiling or the relatives see a smile on the face of the doctor coming out of the operation theater. In a situation like in Bhagavad Gita, it also gives confidence to the patient (Arjuna) that his doctor (Krishna) has understood his problem fully and has a solution to his problem. Buddha is also shown smiling and Goddess Kushmanda is also shown with a smiling face.

 

High fat diet, prostate cancer prone

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Diets high in saturated fats increase the risk of prostate cancer. As per a report from University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston published in the International Journal of Cancer, men who consume high saturated animal fat diet are two times more likely to experience disease progression after prostate cancer surgery than men with lower saturated fat intake. The “disease–free” survival time was also shorter among obese men who eat high saturated fat diet than non–obese men consuming diets low in saturated fat. Non–obese men with high intake and obese men with low intake had “disease–free” survival of 29 and 42 months, respectively. Men with a high saturated fat intake had the shortest survival time free of prostate cancer (19 months). Non–obese men with low fat intake survived the longest time free of the disease (46 months).

Take home messages

• High saturated fat diet has been linked to cancer of the prostate

• Reducing saturated fat in the diet after prostate cancer surgery can help reduce the cancer progression.

• Cancer prostate has the same risk factors as that of heart blockages and both are linked to high saturated fat intake.

• With an increase in number of heart patients, a corresponding increase in prostate cancer patients is also seen in the society.